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Helena

Son Ye-Jin 손예진

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1 hour ago, Helena said:

(Me: In ‘The Negotiation’ DVD commentary, Son Ye-Jin mentioned that she practiced her lines with her English teacher to get the precise pronunciation.  IMO, her English sounded better in ‘The Negotiation’ than in ‘Crash Landing on You’ (perhaps there wasn’t enough time to prepare for a TV drama).

 

 

Have to agree on that. She sounded better in 'Tbe Negotiation'. I think she must have been preparing for the possibility of Hollywood advancement for quite some time. Have time to go for more English lessons.

 

Anyway, I have been wondering about the Japanese dialogues in 'The Last Princess'. How was her pronounciation there? 

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8 hours ago, mulberry9 said:

Have to agree on that. She sounded better in 'Tbe Negotiation'. I think she must have been preparing for the possibility of Hollywood advancement for quite some time. Have time to go for more English lessons.

This article says she’ll play a non-Korean. 

Love Lee Sun-kyun since ‘White Tower’ in 2007, we called him ‘The Voice’ (his voice!).

 

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20200706000694

Son Ye-jin to make Hollywood debut in Andrew Niccol’s ‘The Cross’


By Choi Ji-won | Jul 6, 2020

 

39243F0A-0E1E-429A-A86B-1734BAF20237.jpg

Son Ye-jin (Yonhap)

 

South Korean actress Son Ye-jin is set to make her debut in Hollywood with an upcoming film tentatively titled “The Cross.”

According to an official from Son’s agency MS Team Entertainment on Monday, the actress has given consideration to the film and is undergoing negotiations over details. While stating the actress will likely star in the film, the official was cautious to confirm the decision as of now.

The official also stated Son will play the film’s lead female role -- a non-Korean -- and is expected to speak English throughout the film. Australian actor Sam Worthington, from films “Avatar” (2009) and “Clash of Titans” (2010), will play Son’s counterpart in the film, according to reports from local media.

Meanwhile, actor Lee Sun-kyun, from Oscar-winning film “Parasite,” may also make his first advance into Hollywood in the same film. Lee’s agency HODU&U Entertainment that Lee has been offered a role in the film and is currently considering the offer.

Coming from New Zealand director-screenwriter Andrew Niccol of “Gattaca” (1997) and “Good Kill” (2015), “The Cross” will be another sci-fi flick from the filmmaker, casting a commentary over social division. The film, slated to kick-off production early next year, will include scenes that will be shot in South Korea.

Son, 38, made her debut on television in the series “Delicious Proposal” in 2001, and went on to star in veteran filmmaker Im Kwon-taek’s film “Painted Fire” (2002) and play lead roles in award-winning romance flicks “Classic” (2003) and “A Moment to Remember” (2004). The actress has been active in both film and television and recently starred in the smash-hit tvN series “Crash Landing on You” with actor Hyun Bin.


By Choi Ji-won (jwc@heraldcorp.com)

 

 

https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/art/2020/07/689_292358.html

Son Ye-jin and Lee Sun-kyun in final talks to join Hollywood film

 

By Lee Gyu-lee | July 6, 2020

DEF55466-2DB1-4D2D-B2E3-DC129CB3D697.jpg

Lee Sun-kyun, left, and Son Ye-jin have been offered roles in director Andrew Niccol's film "The Cross." Korea Times file


Actors Son Ye-jin and Lee Sun-kyun are in talks to join the cast of the upcoming Hollywood film "The Cross." 

Son's agency MSteam Entertainment told multiple news outlets that she is positively considering taking the role she was offered. 
"If all goes well, Son will begin filming sometime in the first half of next year," it said.

Hodu and U Entertainment, Lee's agency, also confirmed the actor had been offered a role and was considering it. 

Screenwriter and filmmaker Andrew Niccol, whose work includes "The Truman Show" and "In Time," will direct the film. 

His newest project revolves around a fictional divided region with a bipolar economy of rich and poor. 
 


http://en.tenasia.com/archives/106704

Hollywood Comes Calling for Son Ye Jin and Lee Sun Kyun

 

July 6, 2020 | by You Jung

 

7879BA4D-B27D-4E42-A685-F71257880D05.jpg

Son Ye Jin, Lee Sun Kyun / Photos: Ten Asia DB

 

 

Actors Son Ye Jin and Lee Sun Kyun may be making their move to Hollywood movies soon.

 

Son’s management agency, MSteam Entertainment, revealed on the 6th: “Son Ye Jin has received an offer to star in the film Cross, and she is positively considering the offer. The details are being worked out at this time.” 

 

Set against a backdrop of fictional, multiracial bordering countries in the future, Cross depicts a story about people from a poor country and a wealthy country. Andrew Niccol, who has directed films such as Lord of War and Good Kill, will be helming the project.

 

Niccol, who visited Korea last year, reportedly drew his inspiration for the film from the fact that Korea is the only divided nation in the world.  Rumor has it that he expressed his desire to build a set in Korea and work with Korean actors for this reason. It seems that he contacted Son Ye Jin, during this process, who has starred in films produced in China and a number of other countries.

 

Son has been offered to play the role of Vera, a strong woman who is left to raise her son on her own after her husband dies during an attempt to escape the poor country they live in. Sam Worthington, who is most known among Korean audiences for his role in Avatar, is expected to star opposite Son. Worthington will be taking on the role of a character from the affluent country.

 

In addition to Son Ye Jin, actor Lee Sun Kyun (of Parasite fame) has also received an offer to star in the film as a border guard. As Lee is already scheduled to be filming another project during the second half of the year, his decision to appear in Cross will depend on the timetable for the filming of the movie. 

 

Cross is expected to start principal photography in the first half of 2021.

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17 minutes ago, Helena said:

This article says she’ll play a non-Korean. 

Love Lee Sun-kyun since ‘White Tower’ in 2007, we called him ‘The Voice’.  

 

Thank you for sharing the news articles.

 

So she is expected to speak Eng throughout the show. That itself is a challenge. But I have faith that she'll do well. 

 

Hopefully both will confirmed and the production can go as planned. A little worry since it has been on hold for a decade. Anyways, it also mentioned that she is looking for a movie to film in the 2nd half of this year. Fingers crossed at that one. 

 

 

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been a lurker for quite some time, i'm so excited for her advancement. i cheer for her success. :twerk2:it's been awhile. i hope more yejin stans come here. i read some tweet on twt which this movie might out on 2025? is this true? cz if is why it takes so long?? i'm not really into movies so yeah  :sweatingbullets:

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I find her accent fine - I mean considering she lives and works in Korea - her work doesn't require her to have academic English  level accent unless required which is NOW . Even Bae Doona has a slight accent and she has worked in many American projects. Her accent in CLOY varied but she travels a lot in Europe and US so im sure excessive speaking in English will have her ready by March.  

 

I think the plot is mostly futurist and dystopian . In my understanding the movie didn't went through for production reasons and maybe script ? Who knows? 

 

Im so glad she back on the game . Her last movie was 2 years ago . She tends to follow a pattern. And 2 movies back to back is something she has done before. She filmed NT and BWY back to back as well. 

 

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10 hours ago, mulberry9 said:

Have to agree on that. She sounded better in 'Tbe Negotiation'. I think she must have been preparing for the possibility of Hollywood advancement for quite some time. Have time to go for more English lessons.

 

Really?! I thought her English was actually better in CLOY. A little better. But at least for this movie she would have enough time to polish more.

 

10 hours ago, mulberry9 said:

Anyway, I have been wondering about the Japanese dialogues in 'The Last Princess'. How was her pronounciation there?

 

My husband, who is a non-native Japanese speaker, worked in Japan for 1.5 years  and so he learned the language, saw bits and pieces of The Last Princess. I really don't know the difference between Korean and Japanese, so I didn't know she was already switching languages. My husband immediately noticed and said, "Oh, why is it Japanese now?!" So I guess her pronunciation there was good for a non-native speaker.

 

51 minutes ago, wolfie26 said:

I think the plot is mostly futurist and dystopian . In my understanding the movie didn't went through for production reasons and maybe script ? Who knows? 

 

Lots of movies in Hollywood go through development hell. Even those ones in the vaunted "Black List" (the annual top 100 scripts voted by industry insiders). Lots of reason from actors dropping out, actors' scheduling conflicts, director/studio disagreements, director/writer disagreements, etc. 

 

AMTR actually has a Hollywood remake that's been brewing since 2014. One of the more recent, popular movies that went through development hell was Passengers by Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence. The script was in the Black List in 2007, and Keanu Reeves and Rachel McAdams was set to star. Then it became Emily Blunt. Then it became Reese Witherspoon. The original director was David Fincher, then he was gone. The movie came eventually came out in 2016, a good nine years from when the script was first written.

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I am a bit surprised her character would have to speak English during the entire movie if it is being filmed in SK. I thought she would need to speak both English and Korean. I guess we will find more information once everything is confirmed later. Maybe since it is taking place in the "future" 

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11 minutes ago, ElectricHearts said:

I am a bit surprised her character would have to speak English during the entire movie if it is being filmed in SK. I thought she would need to speak both English and Korean. I guess we will find more information once everything is confirmed later. Maybe since it is taking place in the "future" 

 

From how I understood the description of the movie, while the filming will take place in South Korea because of its unique characteristic of being divided from North Korea with a clear border and animosity towards each other, the movie setting isn't necessarily South Korea. They described it as "Cross is a movie about people between poor and rich countries in the background of a fictional multi-racial future divided nation. " So I don't think it's Korean per se. 

 

That actually reminds me of Snowpiercer - where there is no more personal identity of which country someone is from, but the only identity that matters is class - rich vs. poor.

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Her English: I honestly couldn’t understand what she said in CLOY (especially the scene with the therapist/psychologist). Even when I really tried to focus on her lines, I still had a hard time — had to rewind several times and still wasn’t sure whether I got it.  My friends couldn’t make out what she said as well. 
It would definitely be a problem if she sounds like that in a Hollywood film — would have to rely on closed-captions to understand the dialogue.


The problem is not the accent. 
In Negotiation, I understood what she said without having to try.


——

 

http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2020/07/07/2020070701930.html

Son Ye-jin Poised for Hollywood Debut

 

July 7, 2020

 

FD5DEAC1-4A92-456F-A68D-EA26BB430D01.jpg

Son Ye-jin

Actress Son Ye-jin is poised to make her Hollywood debut soon in the film "Cross," with final contract negotiations underway, her agency said Monday. 

 

"Cross" will be directed by Andrew Niccol, who also made "The Host" (2013) and "Good Kill" (2014), and is set in a futuristic multiracial society.

 

Niccol conceived the idea for the film based on the division of the Koreas when he visited here last year.

It is slated to be shot on location here in the first half of next year.

 

She will be cast opposite Sam Worthington, an Australian best known for his role in "Avatar."

 

Lee Sun-kyun, whose recent work includes Bong Joon-ho's Oscar-winning "Parasite," has also been offered a role but has to wait and see what will happen to his other planned project amid the coronavirus epidemic.
 

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I wonder if her English delivery in CLOY, especially on the bridge, was intentional as she was portraying despair and shock. Her voice sounded shaky. She does have an ear for languages though. I was impressed by her Chinese in CLOY.

 

It was really cute when she said, "thank you so much" at Baeksang. She seemed a bit shy and almost embarrassed which I understand. It's nerve wracking to speak in a foreign language. :sweatingbullets:

 

If filming is completely in English, I hope her acting skills will still shine through. Some film critics have commented that actors (Antonio Banderas comes to mind) can lose a little bit of their ability when delivering lines in a foreign language.

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52 minutes ago, slowpoked said:

Really?! I thought her English was actually better in CLOY. A little better. But at least for this movie she would have enough time to polish more.

 

22 minutes ago, Helena said:

Her English: I honestly couldn’t understand what she said in CLOY. Even when I really tried to focus on her lines, I still had a hard time — had to rewind several times and still wasn’t sure whether I got it.  My friends couldn’t make out what she said as well. 
It would definitely be a problem if she sounds like that in a Hollywood film — would have to rely on closed-captions to understand the dialogue.


The problem is not the accent. 
In Negotiation, I understood what she said without having to try.

 

I share the same sentiment as Helena. But for me, I still can understand her on bridge scene and the last ep. Only got problem with understanding during the scene where she spoke with the woman about wanting to die in Switzerland.

 

Anyways, still got plenty of time to practice :)

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34 minutes ago, Teeners said:

I wonder if her English delivery in CLOY, especially on the bridge, was intentional as she was portraying despair and shock. Her voice sounded shaky. She does have an ear for languages though. I was impressed by her Chinese in CLOY.

 

Yea I found her Chinese really good since Bad Guys Always Die. So I was excited when she got to speak some Chinese in CLOY.

 

For me, I agree her accent is a bit strong for her English in CLOY. However, I understood her fine. The more you don't speak the language the stronger your original accent gets speaking it. My dad's English is really bad now lol since he speaks Chinese so much now. So it will be an easy fix for SYJ. Just need more practice ^_^ Although I had noticed HB had also gone stronger on his accent too for English, maybe it was a choice for the show? 

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50 minutes ago, mulberry9 said:

I share the same sentiment as Helena. But for me, I still can understand her on bridge scene and the last ep. Only got problem with understanding during the scene where she spoke with the woman about wanting to die in Switzerland.

 

I agree, I think her English on the bridge scenes and taking pictures of RJH/SD was better than her English with the therapist. 

 

Speech therapists usually say that when a person is in an elevated mood (angry, happy, agitated, etc.), the native accent gets more pronounced for non-native English speakers.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Helena said:

Her English: I honestly couldn’t understand what she said in CLOY (especially the scene with the therapist/psychologist). Even when I really tried to focus on her lines, I still had a hard time — had to rewind several times and still wasn’t sure whether I got it.  My friends couldn’t make out what she said as well. 


The problem is not the accent. 
In Negotiation, I understood what she said without having to try.


I can understand  what she said to the therapist even at the first Time though she has a strong accent there.Yes, Her English is good in negotiation. Language is a big barrier as acting in English would be more difficult than engaging in usual conversation. TBH, I don’t like the way they treated LBH when he went to Hollywood. I am cautiously positive for this one. 

Edited by Lily Beth
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http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/13468714
Fresh Korean Wave sweeping world, powered by Netflix hits

THE ASAHI SHIMBUN
July 5, 2020 at 07:00 JST

 

DA401AB0-95B7-47F2-A705-6DFB0573C341.jpg
A scene from “Crash Landing on You,” a TV drama exclusively distributed by Netflix (Provided by Netflix)

 

Even a beloved Japanese TV celebrity such as Tetsuko Kuroyanagi could be swept up in the new Korean Wave bringing TV dramas and other entertainment products to foreign shores. 
 

She commented on Instagram on the "interesting" South Korean TV drama "Crash Landing on You" while confessing that she "binge-watched all the episodes without stopping."

 

Led by the popularity of “Crash Landing on You” and “Itaewon Class,” both distributed by Netflix, titles from the country are reigniting the Japanese people’s interest in South Korean pop culture. 

 

They are being highly watched not only in Japan but also the Middle East, Southeast Asia and elsewhere in the world, partly due to their depiction of modern women, the national promotional campaign by Seoul, and stories that can be easily localized.

 

Many posts praising the two South Korean dramas are uploaded every day on Twitter, describing them as “the only touch of color added to my self-isolated life,” while another Twitter user said the person has “watched it five times.”

 

In “Crash Landing on You,” a South Korean woman from a financial conglomerate family crash-lands on North Korea in a paraglider accident, and falls in love with a commissioned officer of the reclusive state’s military.

 

The work is filled with such factors as a huge industrial group, family feuds and other elements often featured in South Korean titles. Humor related to the clash of cultures and an emotional roller-coaster from the heart-tugging romance leave viewers spellbound and sets it apart.  

 

A star from “Winter Sonata,” a pioneering drama released in 2002 to crack open Japan’s entertainment market, makes an appearance in “Crash Landing on You” as well, adding to its appeal.
 

Meanwhile, the protagonist of “Itaewon Class” is a young man whose life was ruined by a powerful family, and he challenges a huge restaurant chain with his friends. The drama adaptation of a popular online comic portrays a strong revenge motivation for his actions.

 

When both titles were put out all over the world on the Netflix video streaming platform following their airing in South Korea, they quickly became two of the most popular works in the service’s ranking.

 

After “Crash Landing on You” and “Itaewon Class” were successively introduced by the mass media in the Middle East, Southeast Asia and other regions, they made waves across the globe.

 

957C63F5-0928-487A-8C49-4AFE9D43C21F.jpg

A scene from Netflix’s original drama series “Itaewon Class” (Provided by Netflix)

 

NEW WOMAN IMAGE


Behind the South Korean drama boom is the empathy of working women. All such works are centered on ambitious heroines who are strong enough to protect the men they love while living in their own style.

 

Another characteristic of those series is that devious aspects of female characters as well as their good personalities are faithfully depicted.

 

The heroines get the better of masculine men who do not want young females to participate in business operations. They also actively communicate with other women in local communities to obtain important information though doing so appears to be an exhausting task.

 

The male protagonists respect the heroines’ autonomy and try to protect them so that their free-wheeling lifestyles will not be hampered.

 

Yone Yamashita, a professor of South Korean culture and women’s studies at Bunkyo University, offered an explanation.

 

“One trend of recent South Korean drama series is that the ways of women living in a down-to-earth manner are presented via the stories,” said Yamashita. “Their creators make the titles with that in mind.”

 

This is in contrast to the way of melodramatic “Winter Sonata,” which captured the hearts of those middle-aged or older in the past.

 

After the first South Korean entertainment boom ended due to soured ties between Tokyo and Seoul and other reasons, the K-pop fever flared up mainly among teens in the 2010s, underlining the fact that interest in South Korean culture constantly grow at some interval in Japan.

 

In the latest boom, many of people posting their drama reviews on social networking sites are those in their 20s to 40s. Of these, working women who feel “exhilarated at the sight of decisive heroines,” in particular, positively view South Korean works.

 

Those titles were marketed as an award was introduced in 1999 in South Korea to honor creations that contribute to gender equality. Working mothers, single-parent's families, gender inequality in households and other social issues, along with love affairs, are portrayed in many such stories.

 

“The dramas show a society a step ahead of the reality, and characters appear in them who break down walls that women frequently face,” said Yamashita. “Viewers can easily relate to problems that overlap their own, so the programs are supported by a wide range of viewers even in Japan.”

 

NATIONWIDE PROMOTION

 

Various forms of assistance for the digital content industry are offered, greatly contributing to the remarkable achievements of pop culture from South Korea. Good examples of successful cases is the global popularity of K-pop singing group BTS and the “Parasite” film, which was recently chosen as the best picture in the Academy Awards.

 

There appear to be no limitations to the spread of South Korean pop culture.

 

Masaki Tsuchida, a film producer living in South Korea, noted that those achievements can be attributed to Seoul’s “nationwide efforts to nurture drama, movie and other industries while regarding them as important export businesses.”

 

When he took office in 1998 in the wake of the Asian currency crisis, then-South Korean President Kim Dae-jung declared himself the “president of culture.”

 

As Hollywood movies dominated the box-office lists throughout the world at the time, Seoul started financing content industries--including films and TV dramas--and developed legal systems to promote exports as part of its economic recovery strategy.

 

Before that, TV plays from South Korea had already been widely accepted among broadcasters in Taiwan and Southeast Asia since the first half of the 1990s, because they were “much cheaper than their Japanese counterparts and comprised many installments.”

 

Cashing in on the trend, the South Korean government strengthened promotion, leading to a further expanded market of dramas outside the nation. This also resulted in higher broadcasting rights fees and production budgets.

 

Guaranteed salaries for new actors and scriptwriters rose as a result, attracting fresh new talent to the entertainment industry.

 

In 2009, the South Korean government set up the Korea Creative Content Agency (KOCCA) to select online animated works and other creations popular among young consumers to be made into dramas and other adaptations.

 

The KOCCA currently has locations in eight regions overseas, including fast-growing Indonesia, the United Arab Emirates, where South Korean products have exploded in popularity, and the United States.

 

Through the establishments, it is attempting to sell titles suitable for markets through business discussions with the makers of video games, animations and dramas in the countries.

 

Hwang Seon-hye, director of the KOCCA Japan Center, said “various kinds of content from South Korea” are now available.

 

According to an estimate by the KOCCA, exports of dramas, films, video games and other such services totaled 1.056 trillion yen ($9.6 billion) in 2018, double the figure for 2012.

 

EASIER TO LOCALIZE


“Crash Landing on You,” “Parasite” and other titles set in situations peculiar to South Korea have proven popular abroad in some instances.

 

But such dramas as “Itaewon Class,” which portrays young people combating economic disparity, are especially promising, because the localized versions of stories themed on universal issues can easily be created outside South Korea.

 

The “Good Doctor” drama series released in Japan following the global hit of its U.S. version, as well as the “Signal” and “Voice” drama series aired in Japan, are all based on stories made in South Korea.

 

Notching a total of more than 4.5 billion views across the world, the South Korean internet cartoon title “Tower of God” was converted into an animated adaptation jointly by Japan, the United States and South Korea.

 

A Japanese TV drama developer is reportedly offering to make a new version of “Itaewon Class” set in Japan’s Roppongi district.

 

“Japan has a well-established history as a great content creator, and has exceptionally high anime and drama-making abilities,” said Hwang. “We will collaborate with each other, not competing, to spread high quality products to other parts of the world.”

 

(This article was written by Natsuki Edogawa and Erina Ito.)

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I agree her accent was heavier in CLOY than in TN. Although I understood her without having to read the subtitle, I can see other people straining their ears a bit to understand what she was saying to the therapist.

 

Since it says her character comes from a 'poor' background and/or was living in some other country...then it should be alright for her to show a bit of an accent? It will still be quite a challenge for her to tone it down for the entire filming but I'm rooting for her and for writer to find some way around it.

 

19 hours ago, mulberry9 said:

Anyway, I have been wondering about the Japanese dialogues in 'The Last Princess'. How was her pronounciation there? 

I'm not good with Japanese, just barely enough to get by for work trips and pass the lowest level proficiency test. But I thought she did great. What stood out to me was her intonation at certain points still sounded more Korean than Japanese (if that makes sense). But I thought she did well, believable enough for her character who was a proud Joseon princess sent to Japan at age 13. Koreans have a natural advantage at learning Japanese though, speaking English is a different beast.

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7 hours ago, ElectricHearts said:

Yea I found her Chinese really good since Bad Guys Always Die. So I was excited when she got to speak some Chinese in CLOY.

 

Actually I find her Chinese in BGAD not quite understandable too.

Her Chinese in CLOY is a bit better.

 

The part with the therapist - I cannot really understand. Maybe too many lines? Whereas the part at the bridge and last part - still ok but need to strain my ears. 

 

1 hour ago, gloriousCh33se said:

I'm not good with Japanese, just barely enough to get by for work trips and pass the lowest level proficiency test. I thought she did great. What stood out to me was her intonation at certain points still sounded more Korean than Japanese (if that makes sense) but I thought she did well, believable enough for her character who was a proud Joseon princess sent to Japan at age 13. Koreans have a natural advantage at learning Japanese though, speaking English is a different beast.

 

I agree that her Japanese in the Last Princess seems pretty good, probably because there are more similarities with the Korean language than with Japanese. 

 

Knowing SYJ, I am sure that she will work hard and diligently brush up on her English before the Cross shooting. She is such a perfectionist! She will probably take some lessons and watch a ton of English movies/shows. She can also practice with HB and GHJ - I understand that GHJ stayed in Australia for some years before returning to Korea.

 

 

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I am not optimistic that SYJ will accept the role in The Cross. Her agency's comments included the standard reviewing the offer "details" which means financials but also commented about the script which is unusual. A basic script or scenario is sent to agencies to try to hook interest for actors and investors. The Cross has been circulating around Hollywood for 11 years (with several different casts assigned to it). But it has never been green lit to production. An actor can have some input on the script and its direction, but it is the director who controls the vision (and in this case perhaps tunnel vision since the director is the screenwriter).

 

Andrew Niccol's  claim to fame was as a scriptwriter, mainly sci-fi genre. In looking up this project, he is listed as the writer, director and producer.  In movies that he held all three roles, he has had very mixed results.

 

Andrew Niccol movies as writer, director, producer:

2018 Anon : 54/100 mixed, average reviews (sci-fi) $1.2 million box office  ($20 million budget)

2014 Good Kill: 63/100 generally favorable reviews (drama) $1.5 million box office (budget unknown)

2011 In Time: 53/100 mixed, average reviews (sci-fi action) $174 million box office ($40 million budget)

2005 Lord of War  62/100 generally favorable reviews (crime drama) $72 million box office ($50 million budget)

2002 Simone (S1m0ne) 49/100 below average reviews (sci-fi) $19.6 box office ($10 million budget)

1997 Gattaca  64/100 generally favorable reviews (sci fi) $12.5 million ($36 million budget)

 

Only half of his full control movies have made money. His last two which were terrible box office failures even with established movie stars.  Also of note, his movie budgets have continually decreased over time meaning that investors are not confident in his ability to make a return on their investment. Hollywood seeks out bankable projects. Track records matter.

 

As with any mediaplay, it seems the leak of offer was made from the production company. SYJ agency had to react to the report (it is usually very tight lipped about speculative articles). It reminds me of Boston 1947 where the producers made an offer (which SYJ quickly declined) but kept her name associated with the project for years in order to keep interest alive while it tried to find investors and cast.

 

A review of Niccol's industry bio does not show The Cross as being listed as announced or in pre-production which means he has no commitments to begin the project. Even if he has a development deal with a studio, the studio is not committed to fund any of his projects. His only current assignment is as a screenwriter for the movie Monopoly, based on the board game, which started pre-production a year ago.

 

I can see why Niccol reached out to SYJ. CLOY's success on Netflix has made her name in America studio circles. South Korean content has some international buzz. South Korea's film production costs are much lower than the US so there is a greater chance of success (such as Parasite's $165 million box office on $11 million budget). Hollywood producers are in a copycat industry looking to ride the next popularity wave.

 

But even in South Korea, most movie productions have been halted or slowed due to the pandemic. In Hollywood, its first post-shutdown production was red flagged (or halted) by the unions since the production company failed to meet basic CDC and state health guidelines for COVID19. Filming and scheduling is going to be an issue for the rest of the year. Most major studios have pushed back 2020 summer and major holiday releases to 2021 and 2022. This backlog of feature films will squeeze out independent films which Niccol's production would fit into.

 

SYJ has become quite particular on what kinds of projects she wants to make. This has served her well as she has been a consistent domestic box office draw. She has had limited experience in foreign productions (one in China). Her international fan base is strongest in Japan, Philippines and India. It could make more sense to first expand her Asian base.  Or it would be better if she attached herself to a major studio production if she wants a Hollywood debut like Lee Byung-Hun did.

 

I also think SYJ is in no hurry to start another project. CLOY was a grueling film shoot (with her getting sick enough to go to the hospital). After stressful projects, she said she would travel but with all the virus restrictions that may not be possible. Instead, by my count, she is currently has at least five (5) CF endorsements (which is more than normal) to keep her busy through this year. If she wants to do an English speaking film, I suspect that she would spend a year learning the language since she is a perfectionist in trying to master her character roles. But learning a foreign language is difficult. I have been learning Korea for the past year. It is a difficult language because it is contextual. Its sentence and grammar structure involves subject identifiers and place holders as well as different sentence structures. It took a long time to get a basic understanding but vocabulary, how to pronounce the nuisances of letters and vowels and various tenses is hard to retain from mere book learning.  But it important to take a challenge in our current stay-at-home world. I think SYJ could master a new language if she puts her mind to it and she has the time to commit to it. In past interviews, she said she would have liked to respond to her English-speaking fans questions, but it seems she has not been a priority.

 

I think her priority is making the best decision to fit her legacy. Less bankable actresses who are reaching 40 years old have to take more risks for diminished returns. I do not think SYJ needs to take on a risky project that could tarnish her reputation. Based on my comments above, I do not think a risky project like The Cross fits into her filmography.

 

 

 

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As a follow up, I checked Sam Worthington's industry bio. He currently has FOUR movies in post-production. He is currently filming Avatar sequels which equates to FOUR more franchise movies. And he has FOUR movies in pre-production. In all, he already has ten years worth of film projects on his docket. The Cross is not one of them.

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On 7/7/2020 at 9:21 AM, welh11 said:

 

I also think SYJ is in no hurry to start another project. CLOY was a grueling film shoot (with her getting sick enough to go to the hospital). After stressful projects, she said she would travel but with all the virus restrictions that may not be possible. Instead, by my count, she is currently has at least five (5) CF endorsements (which is more than normal) to keep her busy through this year. If she wants to do an English speaking film, I suspect that she would spend a year learning the language since she is a perfectionist in trying to master her character roles. But learning a foreign language is difficult. I have been learning Korea for the past year. It is a difficult language because it is contextual. Its sentence and grammar structure involves subject identifiers and place holders as well as different sentence structures. It took a long time to get a basic understanding but vocabulary, how to pronounce the nuisances of letters and vowels and various tenses is hard to retain from mere book learning.  But it important to take a challenge in our current stay-at-home world. I think SYJ could master a new language if she puts her mind to it and she has the time to commit to it. In past interviews, she said she would have liked to respond to her English-speaking fans questions, but it seems she has not been a priority.

 

I think her agency answered the way they did since what happened to her last Hollywood offer in 2010 with JDG (My Way) and how that turned out with a significant change to her character in that script. She was announced to be in talks in February and then dropped out in July.  Plus we know anything can change during this covid situation/pandemic. Plus I had also mentioend similar to @welh11 that Sam has so many pre production films. After he is done filming Avatar 2 this year, is he really going to film The Cross next? There has to be a reason why THR or Variety haven't even mentioned about Sam potentially starring in this movie yet or even before. The last casting news on the film was 2009!!

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