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JamaicaK

Kam Woo Sung 감우성

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PeerNorway said: @JamaicaK, I might be wrong, but when a South Korean actress gets married then there seems to be a drop of popularity or/and interests - and not many movie and TV-serie are offered. Is this expected ? And do you know if Mr. Kam Woo-sung's popularity dropped when he got married ?

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Guest TamiaAjuma

The cool atmosphere is still lasting in my country now. Spring is coming. It makes me miss DH so much. No one can replace him in my heart.

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Review of R-point from Koreanfilm.org: 
R-Point

War and horror as cinematic genres can make compelling partners. Many war films-- Apocalypse Now (1979) comes to mind-- have in fact drawn upon conventions and tropes of the horror genre to depict the cruelty and madness induced by the dehumanizing conditions of an armed conflict. Conversely, supernaturally inclined horror films have sometimes mined the battlefields to explore their character's psychology, especially guilt and paranoia, in such well-known examples as Jacob's Ladder (1990). R-Point, the directorial debut of the screenwriter Kong Su-chang (Tell Me Something [1999], Ring Virus [1999] and another Viet Nam-themed film White Badge [1992]), combines all these elements into a potent mix. The film is an unabashedly political commentary on the suppressed history of Korean involvement in global armed conflicts, including the current entanglement in Iraq. It is also a very good conventional horror film. There is no shortage of the things that go bump in the night, even if many of the techniques employed are not so inventive (the least effective among them is the ghost's POV shots, completely unnecessary and diminishing the intensity of some scenes). On the other hand, I liked the idea of radios functioning as a sort of psychic machine that amplifies anxiety and fear among the troops. The location shooting in Kampuchea (including inside the eerie, abandoned hotel originally built by the French) is highly effective and suffuses the film with a genuine sense of foreboding.   The film's greatest asset is its excellent cast, led by Gam Woo-sung (Spider Forest), using his intellectual and clean-cut demeanor to portray a shell-shocked officer drowning in cynicism, and Son Byung-ho (Mokpo, Gangster's Paradise) as a tightly reigned-in, pressure-cooker sergeant whose violent impulses are just waiting to be unleashed. The supporting roles are designed to present a cross-section of rural and lower-class Korean males some thirty-odd years ago, but the actors all rise above the stereotypes. It is a testament to their acting (and good writing) that we end up caring about these characters and do not feel the urge to play the game of "Who's gonna get it first?" Kim Byung-chul as Private Cho initially appears to be set up for being either the requisite "expert" on supernatural matters or a comic relief, with his owl eyes and comically "square" line delivery, but he presents a full-rounded character. Oh Tae-gyung (the younger Dae-su from Oldboy) and Park Won-sang (A Smile, etc.) make an odd couple, playing a take-no-crap-from-anybody teenage ruffian and a happily married but easily tempted mess-worker, respectively, with somewhat predictable character arcs, but they expertly play off each other, culminating in one of the most haunting death scenes in recent memory. The powerful climax of the film is almost entirely dependent on the acting of the cast, with the minimum of SFX razzle-dazzle, as the characters completely lose their bearings and are overwhelmed by paranoia. They pull it off beautifully: the sequence successfully translates the frisson and immediacy of a great theater act onto the screen. I must point out that R-Point, with all of its subtle and balanced characterizations (American soldiers are not depicted as gum-chewing macho hunks ready to hunt down "Charlies," for one), is not that removed from a liberal America-centered take on the Viet Nam conflict, such as Casualties of War (1989) and Platoon (1986). What is invariably missing in these films is a Vietnamese perspective on the "foreign invaders." The Vietnamese native figure is almost always feminized, as a victim of rape and male aggression, even if R-Point makes it clear that she takes an active role in retaliation against the foreign army. Still, young Koreans living today could certainly use a reminder that Korean soldiers were once the hated "invaders" and no, you cannot blame Americans or Japanese for what they have done to the Vietnamese people. R-Point is highly recommended to those who like intelligent and thoughtful thrillers that have more on their minds than just giving you goose bumps. (Kyu Hyun Kim)

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Review of "Spider Forest" from Koreanfilm.org: 
Spider Forest
Kang Min (Gam Woo-sung, Marriage is a Crazy Thing, R-Point), a producer at a TV broadcasting station, drops in an isolated cabin deep in a forest. There, he discovers the body of a middle-aged man hacked to pieces, and his girlfriend Su-yeong (Kang Kyung-heon), mortally wounded. Pursuing a shadow appearing to be the perpetrator, he is counter-attacked by the latter and drags himself down to a road, only to be smashed flat like a bug by a speeding SUV. Barely surviving brain surgery, Kang finds himself a prime suspect in the double murder case. And yet, he cannot shake the feeling that there are some strange gaps in his memory regarding the killer's identity. Aiding Kang in his tormented quest to figure out the truth are the owner of a beaten-down photographic studio near the forest, Su-in (Suh Jung, Peppermint Candy, The Isle), with the face of his dead wife, Eun-ah (also played by Suh Jung); and Detective Choe (Jang Hyeon-seong, also in Song Il-gon's latest film Git) assigned to the case.  It is difficult to characterize Spider Forest in a succinct marketing formula, which perhaps explains its failure at the domestic box-office. More likely, the viewers were disappointed at the fact that the film is not a clever brain-teaser like, say, Memento (1996) or Identity (2003), although it does wrap up its convoluted mystery into a logical resolution at the end, at least in my opinion. The "answer" makes total emotional sense, even if some of the puzzle pieces are left for the viewers to fill in on their own. So take it as a fair warning from me that the movie is not best appreciated as a tightly constructed murder-mystery. Nor is it by any stretch of imagination a horror film (unless you want to call David Cronenberg's Spider [2003] a horror film as well... another excellent work of art that explores a similar theme from a very different angle). Spider Forest is, beneath its surface dressing as a vaguely supernatural mystery-thriller, an exploration of one man's profound grief and inability to come to terms with his failings in life. In this sense, and also in tone and aesthetic sensibility, it is highly reminiscent of the works of Eastern European and Russian masters, especially Andrei Tarkovsky and Krysztof Kieslowski. The tropes Spider Forest makes use of are thoroughly "Western" but not in the superficial sense of the accoutrement for sophistication and philosophizing. Intricate as they are, they are adeptly harnessed for an intellectually and aesthetically coherent presentation of the film's spiritual theme. For instance, I was startled to realize that Eun-ah's little mime performance for her husband's amusement, using an invisible apple, is a retelling of the Serpent's seduction of Adam and Eve: later, when the Chief Producer Choe (Cho Seong-ha) is brutally semi-raping a character, he is seen loudly crunching on apples, squawking "Life is a war... War war." At another point, a petal from white flowers, dried like dead skin, leaves a heart-shaped marking on a glass table amidst a layer of dust. An unnaturally green blackboard in an elementary school classroom recalls the green scarf worn by Su-in, which in turn anchors her character in the greenery of the forest. The spiders, the guardians of the forest, with the cobwebs they spin around the dead bodies, represent the memory the characters want to keep locked in the dark recesses of their minds. And finally the climactic realization of the metaphor "light at the end of the tunnel" is made doubly ironic due to the nature of the location the "end of the tunnel" leads to. Director Song Il-gon, as he did in his previous film Flower Island (2001), does a marvelous job with the cast he has assembled. Gam Woo-sung, still looking like a poker-faced university professor with a Ph.D. in French literature, nonetheless articulates with superb sense of control the subtly differentiated shades of Kang Min's character. Suh Jung, on the other hand, is going to stun anyone who remembers her only by her turn in Kim Ki-duk's The Isle (2000). Here, her fierce glare has been tempered into the gentle gazes of a woman content and happy in love, and conversely, grieving over the suffering of a loved one. She is particularly brilliant in the role of Eun-ah, who must project girlish charm without compromising her depth of soul in a relatively short span of screen time. The eclectic but excellent supporting cast includes Pak Won-sang (A Smile, R-Point) as Kang's disabled producer colleague, Son Byung-ho as the surgeon who operates on Kang (Son, perennially typecast as violent or slimy villains, is allowed to essay gentle and sensitive characters in Song's films. When are we ever going to have a Korean movie with Son Byung-ho in the lead role?), and Yun Ju-sang (Arahan, President's Barber) as the elementary schoolteacher. Spider Forest is a (psychoanalytic) fairy tale for adults, dark and painful but also acutely compassionate. Its parable-like structure is echoed in the stories the two characters played by Suh Jung perform and tell to the protagonist, sorrowful and beautiful, underscored with the feelings of loss and irrecoverability of past happiness. Having gone through an experience of loss akin to its protagonist's, I have to admit that I was deeply affected by the film. It is so far the most moving Korean film I have seen from 2004. (Kyu Hyun Kim)

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Promoting "My Spring Day" for Japan.  This was on Soo-Young's Instagram today.  My thanks to WS's Daum Cafe for posting it.CM%20Capture%206_zpsb7sogukm.jpg~origina

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class="entry-title" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font-size: 24px; font: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(70, 77, 93); font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; line-height: 40px; "So I guess there was a parody of "R-Point" done on Korean tv?

class="entry-title" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0px; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; font: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(70, 77, 93); font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; line-height: 40px; "‘개콘’ 영화 ‘알포인트’ 패러디한 새 코너 선보여…김지민 처녀귀신 변신

Posted by 정시우 입력 : 2015/01/18 22:44:23

'알포인트' 김지민

‘알포인트’ 김지민 

‘개그콘서트’가 새 코너 ‘알포인트’를 선보였다.

18일 방송된 KBS2 ‘개그콘서트’에서는 ‘알포인트’가 처음으로 공개됐다.

‘알포인트’는 감우성 주연의 영화 ‘알포인트’를 패러디한 코너로 베트남전에 참전한 군인들이 죽음의 두려움 속에서도 담담하게 행동하려는 모습을 유쾌하게 풀어냈다.

이동균 김장군 김지민 이세진 정명훈 윤한민 등이 출연하는 코너에서 김지민은 귀신으로 분해 눈길을 끌었다. 최근 종영한 코너 ‘쉰밀회’에서 과장된 물광 메이크업으로 눈길을 끌었던 김지민은 이번엔 모자란 베트남 처녀 귀신으로 출연해 앞으로의 활약에 기대를 더했다. 

글. 정시우 siwoorain@tenasia.co.kr 

Edited by JamaicaK

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KoreanFilm.org review of "Marriage is a Crazy Thing." 
Marriage is a Crazy Thing 

Marriage is a Crazy Thing is a fascinating film. Based on Yi Man-gyo's award-winning novel and directed by the poet Yu Ha, best known for the collection of sardonic, laid-back, "postmodern" poetry entitled On a Windy Day We Must Go to Apgujeong-dong, (which he also adapted into a movie in 1993) it was a surprise sleeper of the spring season, attracting more than one million viewers nationwide and besting such big-budget competitors as Chihwaseon and Funny Movie at the box office.  The movie consists of a series of vignettes concerning a love affair between Joon-yeong, (Kam Woo-seong) a college lecturer of English literature and confirmed bachelor, and Yeon-hee, (Uhm Jung-hwa) an interior designer looking for a happy marriage and a hot romance. After a less-than-impressive blind date, Joon-yeong and Yeon-hee come to realize that they make a fabulous couple: they have terrific sex, are great conversational partners, have complimentary tastes in people, clothing and food, and generally enjoy each other's company. They may even have fallen in love, God forbid. However, Yeon-hee turns out to be serious about having a financially rewarding marriage. She is not about to sacrifice her life to some cockamamie idea of "true love." Joon-yeong, equally adamant about not committing himself to the shackles of marriage, will soon find out just how determined Yeon-hee is to have her cake and eat it too. Told from the viewpoint of Joon-yeong, punctuated by his droll observations about himself, Yeon-hee and the people around them, Marriage is nearly totally purged of melodramatic conventions, and shies away from dramatic emphasis of any kind as well. Characters don't die, scream obscenities or slap the faces of their partners in this movie. Its rhythm simulates that of a real-life relationship, complete with dull patches and sudden intensifications. Director Yu resolutely refuses to judge his characters, keeping the narrative open-ended to the very last shot. Although self-reflexive and ironic, Marriage is not modernist or "experimental" in the manner of, say, Camel(s). It does not appear to take its "messages" too seriously, but somehow, by the end of the movie, the viewers are led by this shrewd concoction to reflect on the nature of human relationship and the happiness to be found therein. The movie is terrifically cast. Uhm Jung-hwa, referred to in some circles as the "Madonna of Korea," whatever that means, is perfect as Yeon-hee, bold, attractive and perhaps more than a little manipulative: imagine a beautiful, svelte flower with slightly animal-like fragrance... and maybe carnivorous, to boot. Kam Woo-seong is at once bland and sly: his restrained performance prevents us from figuring out what is going on in Joon-yeong's mind. At one point, a cute student admirer steals a kiss from Joon-yeong's lips: his response is a poker-faced stare that tells us almost nothing. Still, Kam manages to snare our sympathy for Joon-yeong and, in the bittersweet climax of the film, we share the character's sense of isolation and regret. Marriage's (now infamous) sex scenes are extremely graphic but presented so naturally, they become oddly endearing, shorn of any sense of embarrassment. (Too Young to Die may make an interesting comparison in this respect) Marriage will inevitably leave some viewers confused or bored: its unhurried approach to storytelling may be construed as lack of energy or verve, and its specifically metropolitan, Seoulite milieu may be an alienating factor, in the way certain movies set in New York City have a limited appeal in North America. Nonetheless, viewed with an open mind, the film is not only charming and engaging, but also unexpectedly honest and touching. After watching it, I found myself wondering what I would have done in Joon-yeong's shoes, and if I were a woman, whether I could have gone through with Yeon-hee's choices. Oasis and One Fine Spring Day may be cinematically superior, but the seemingly (and deceptively) under-achieving Marriage may yet diverge the truths about contemporary Korean lives that even these masterpieces do not. (Kyu Hyun Kim)

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Newspaper Clips on "Mountain," from Naver Library.

1-27-19971997-01-27PicwithArticle_zpsceb0b79a.png1997-01-27Article_zps7959ee5d.png~origin
1997-1-27CastProfile_zpsedb828da.png~ori KWSMountainshot_zpsxhmvb2vz.png


1-24-19971997-1-24_zps6ff059c9.png~original


2-11-19971997-02-11_zps8215e319.png~original
2-17-1997
1997-2-17_zpsf9e3fe30.png~original

1997-5-12_zpsa1547f62.png~original
5-12-199757fcdf63-f5f4-483b-bb1b-48d080655430_zps1997-05-12b_zps9006135d.png~original

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Guest TamiaAjuma

wow, I don't know what to say, i'm very very very happy to see them. His right hand put on her head, hahaha

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Kam Woo Sung minus his fringe....but still looking drop dead gorgeous and handsome. Finally there' s a latest picture and currents news of him.....@JamaicaK thank you for the articles and photos...Im really very very happy to see him again

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Guest TamiaAjuma

I saw this poem on the grave in HK series named Divine Retribution, starring Sean Lau, Amy Kwok… This film and poem actually moved me. Be a MSD fan, I love the ending because it is an inevitable part of real life.

Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep.

I am not there. I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.

I am the diamond glints on snow.

I am the sunlight on ripened grain.

I am the gentle autumn rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush

I am the swift uplifting rush

Of quiet birds in circled flight.

I am the soft stars that shine at night.

Do not stand at my grave and cry;

I am not there. I did not die.

Mary Elizabeth Frye

1932

--------------------

Have a nice weekend

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I guess this is one of Woo-Sung and Min-ah's wedding photos - their traditional portrait?
image_zpsqctukzli-1.jpg

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Courtesy of WS's Daum Cafe. More from Japanese publicity photo session, as photo session/interview, in progress.  Can't wait to see the photos that were taken!
resized_20150126_160457_-2088098546_zpsvresized_20150126_160457_-986862874_zpsxm1422255719501_zpsaszdbbxh.jpg~originalresized_20150126_160457_914931573_zps7r5

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Guest TamiaAjuma

This morning I’ve heard ‘My Love’ song from radio, that reminded me about blue sea, white sand, green field,…and Shepherd of Udo island. I whisper ‘hope my dreams will take me there’ like the lyrics:

“…So I say a little prayer
And hope my dreams will take me there
Where the skies are blue to see you once again
My love

Overseas from coast to coast
To find the place I love the most
Where the fields are green to see you once again
My love…”

Have a nice day

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I received my copy of Woo-Sung's Very Rustic Wine Handbook.  It's been fun looking in it, and seeing better reproductions of his artwork, seeing the places in Bordeaux where he stayed, and fun to see the things that caught his eye, whether they were landscapes, home interiors, pets, a winemaker's collectables, the food he ate, beautiful buildings, etc.  I've been using my iphone's Hangul keyboard to type sentences into Google, Bing, and SDL translator, to get an idea of some of his writing.  Wish I was more disciplined about my Korean "lessons," so I could be further along.  Online translators just don't do it well enough.
winebook_zpstquhhpvi.jpg~originalf555dfc9-ca17-4db1-8e94-357de2198ecd_zps92692515-9382-47b2-8837-6a96c7a5070e_zps

Fuel & finished work:6fb99cc5-686f-49d3-936e-629e370c2d2c_zps
b1c3a3f0-1d96-407e-a103-ad6fb3c2ada5_zps 1e88d5bf-318f-418e-bb97-48b8261a7355_zps
5e37c659-6b1b-480c-8a69-eb94d5ca1f0f_zps
JackRussell_zpszir6cccr.jpg

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From:  http://gamwoosungfan.blog85.fc2.com/saramu1_zpsqp0w5ien.jpg~original saramu2_zpse1egjyga.jpgsaramu3_zpswwzqh4tu.jpg~originalsaramu4_zpskbsegudn.jpg~original

And other odds & ends, mostly from Daum Cafe:3_zpsmnhpxcha.jpg ye5_zpsu05hrphm.jpg23_zpsfcwpheey.jpgyeoin1_zpseda45962.jpg~original4_zps4f78d426.jpgpro01_04_zpscacd215e.jpg pro01_02_zpsc1f4f962.jpgyeoin2_zps21c7a26d.jpgyeoin3_zps0d8360ea.jpgyeoin4_zpsafe4903c.jpgyeoin5_zps37dd8d29.jpgyeoin6_zps5b63ff70.jpgyeoin7_zpsd8be76ed.jpgye1_zps89269ed9.jpg~originalye2_zps37efe0e1.jpgye3_zpsef134d58.jpgye4_zps6d0d4091.jpg64463071_zps383013f0.jpgimg_0_zps2e1d4a99.jpegDSC_0126_zpsh8hegorr.jpg~originalDSC_0158_zpspq1zjeqe.jpg53_zpsegdndhee.jpg  78_zps90heasvm.jpg    chu20140411114023_I_01_C_1_zpszebu6k4b.j NISI20070608_0004569108_web_zpshmg0weix.
20071228222625_zpsxcpz12d7.jpg  NISI20070609_0004572813_web_zpsuzjdfizc.  marriage0_zpsdnht2k3f.jpg  marriage6_zpsebanb0yy.jpgCM%20Capture%208_zpsnzo0yg3i.jpgCM%20Capture%207_zps8yxwpmmf.jpg
2950635767_a4b5c2c4_2014-12-27-15-59-45_

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More newspaper articles from Naver Library:
September 18, 19971997-09-18KWSProfile_zps46dc4998.png~ori

1997-9-29_zps455cd4a1.png~original
April 20, 19981998-04-20_zpsef52d237.png

June 29, 19981998-06-29_zpsb7c3f45d.png~original
1998-06-29Pic_zps7869cdd2.png~original




September 16, 19981998-09-16MedicalCenter_zps3b51472c.png

August 8, 1999
1999-08-13_zpsc4bb4421.png~original

September 9, 19991999-9-9_zps8919483b.png~original1999-9-11_zpse84726b2.png~originalCMCapture45_zps4f8e103a.jpg~original9-15-99_zpse226a0fd.png~original1999-10-30_zps27018de4.png~original


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Guest TamiaAjuma

I love your last pics so much because I 've known him since I'm Still loving you. I still remember that the elders criticized Kim Hyung Chul teacher for loving his student. hehehe

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TamiaAjuma said: I love your last pics so much because I 've known him since I'm Still loving you. I still remember that the elders criticized Kim Hyung Chul teacher for loving his student. hehehe

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