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[Movie 2017] Single Rider 싱글라이더

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February 17, 2017

2017.2.17 NOW PLAYING

A Single Rider (15)

Source: INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily

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Drama/ 97/ Korean

Lee Byung-hun plays a branch manager at a stock company named Jae-hoon, who has a stable job and a regular family. He leads a successful life, although his family is currently in Australia. One day when an incident concerning bad credit almost destroys his company, things fall apart for Jae-hoon and he decides to head to Australia, where his family is based. When he see his wife, Soo-jin, played by Kong Hyo-jin, moving on without Jae-hoon in her life plans, he suddenly disappears without a trace. This story depicts the life of a man who suddenly loses everything, and uncovers the truth behind the incident.

Lee Byung-hun is one of Korea’s top actors, known for his roles in “Joint Security Area,” “The Good, the Bad, the Weird” and “I Saw the Devil.” The actor has also been successful in Hollywood as well, with roles in “Terminator Genisys,” “The Magnificent Seven” and “G.I.Joe: The Rise of Cobra.”

SINGLE RIDER Early Screening on 2/17 

Source: KoBiz

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February 17, 2017

Gong Hyo Jin To Star In Single Rider

BntNews via MSN

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© Provided by BNT

Actress Gong Hyo Jin was at the press conference for movie ‘Single Rider’ which was held at CGV Wangsimni in Hangdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul, on February 17.

In ‘Missing’, the top star previously mesmerized the public with her skillful acting and talent for expressing emotions into words and motions. This time she’s back with another complicated character which raises excitement and anticipation amongst cinema lovers.

The actress is a also a fashion icon and her public appearances always are very stylish. That day is another example of her great sense of style and perfect taste.

Meanwhile, movie ‘Single Rider’ which stars Lee Byung Hun, Gong Hyo Jin and Ahn So Hee tells the story of a father who lived a very safe life as a branch manager of a stock company but suddenly discover a shocking truth as he disappears to Australia after a debt incident. It will hit theaters on February 22.

SINGLE RIDER Press Preview

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February 20, 2017

To some, 'Single Rider' may become life-long favorite: actor Lee Byung-hun

By Shim Sun-ah and Jung Ahran

SEOUL, Feb. 20 (Yonhap) -- The forthcoming Korean film "A Single Rider" would provide a rare chance to see an authentic and sentimental performance from actor Lee Byung-hun.

He plays the role of Kang Jae-hoon, a middle-aged "goose father" who heads a regional branch of a stock-trading company in Seoul. Goose fathers refer to men who are left behind to work in Korea to pay for their families to live and study abroad.

After losing everything due to bad loans, Jae-hoon travels to Australia to meet his family there. He, however, gets suspicious of his wife being unfaithful and starts watching her from a distance, only to confront a shocking truth.

"This is the kind of work that I never wanted to miss," Lee said as soon as he sat together with film reporters for a group interview at a Seoul cafe.

Actor Lee Byung-hun poses for the camera in this photo provided by Warner Bros. Korea on Feb. 20, 2017. (Yonhap)

Actor Lee Byung-hun poses for the camera in this photo provided by Warner Bros. Korea on Feb. 20, 2017. (Yonhap)

"When I first read the screenplay, I had no expectations that it would be another 10-million film," he said, emphasizing that his choice of the film has nothing to do with its commercial potential.

In South Korea, average-budget films with more than 10 million views are considered a huge box office success.

Then what elements of the film have shaken the top actor's mind so much?

 He singled out the movie's screenplay written by its director Lee Joo-young with help from the internationally-acclaimed Korean auteur Lee Chang-dong of "Poetry" (2010) and "Secret Sunshine" (2007). "I was just drawn by the story's overall sensibility and atmosphere."

Jae-hoon is an everyman character that is in stark contrast with Lee's previous roles as a political thug Ahn Sang-gu in "Inside Men" and Jeong Chae-san, leader of a group of Korean independence fighters in "The Age of Shadows" and Chairman Jin, the con artist in "Master."

In A Single Rider, Lee's Jae-hoon looked so helpless when he was slapped in the face by angry customers as he was on his knees in a gesture of deep repentance and moved about the neighborhood even after observing his wife smiling at the man living next door.

"I don't know what I would do if it were me 10 years ago, but now I'm more like Jae-hoon," said the 46-year-old actor, adding that people change as time goes by. "I let everything go and fall into low spirits when faced with certain situations (of crisis) these days, thinking like 'What can I do in this situation?' That's why I really empathize with Jae-hoon."

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows the poster for "A Single Rider" (Yonhap)   

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows the poster for "A Single Rider" (Yonhap) 

Lee said he finds it more difficult but interesting to do a drama film like A Single Rider that follows a character's subtle emotions rather than action movies.

"Visual elements take up a lot of spectacle films, but movies like this one lose big if its main actors' tone of subtle emotions vary depending on their physical conditions. So I get more sensitive than usual when I have to shoot this kind of film."

 Filming of A Single Rider was demanding because it featured many close-up headshots of Lee. He appears in more than 90 percent of the whole film.

"I expected to be able to refresh myself while filming in Australia, but it was harder to work there because I was not given days off."

 The actor praised the film during the entire one-hour interview, showing a strong affection for it.

"I don't think it would be fun for everyone. But for some viewers, I think it may become his or her life-long favorite," he said.

A Single Rider opens in local theaters on Wednesday. It is the second Korean-language film produced and presented by Warner Bros.

sshim@yna.co.kr

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Published on February 20, 2017 by Warnerbros. Korea

SINGLE RIDER Campaign Video

 

February 20, 2017

SINGLE RIDER: Please, No Spoiler

Source: Sports Chosun ++

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The cast of soon-to-be released SINGLE RIDER has asked audience to refrain from revealing the spoiler in the upcoming movie in a campaign video uploaded by Warner Bros. Korea on February 21. The movie which will be released on the 22nd is said to contain 'an element of surprise' and the production hopes that the situation will be kept to a minimum so that more moviegoers will enjoy watching SINGLE RIDER without being spoiled beforehand. (ELBH Google-translate)

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February 21, 2017 (ELBH Google-translate)

Photo: 이주봉 ‏@dirzoo 

SINGLE RIDER first thought was on April 30, 2013 at 3:47 am and now, the finished movie will open on February 22, 2017. It took me a long time but SINGLE RIDER which is filled with a lot of heart from the actors and crew, hope to meet a lot of audience.

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February 21, 2017

Behind the charisma, Lee Byung-hun is drawn to subtlety
Lee goes for contemplative but striking drama in ‘A Single Rider’

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Lee Byung-hun poses for a photo before an interview Monday at a cafe in Samcheong-dong, Seoul. (All That Cinema)

In one of his most acclaimed performances, Lee Byung-hun plays a gang member ordered to spy on his boss’s wife in director Kim Jee-woon’s 2005 noir “A Bittersweet Life.”

The character starts out as a ruthless perfectionist trusted to unquestioningly execute orders. But struggling with his dreams and real life, he begins to act on his own impulses.

While playing his recent role in the upcoming psychological drama “A Single Rider,” Lee was strongly reminded of that tortured gang member he had portrayed over a decade ago. 

“(In terms of) the way you follow the characters’ emotional development, the two seemed to oddly overlap,” he said at an interview Monday at a cafe in Samcheong-dong, Seoul.

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(Warner Bros.)

The film is the debut feature of former commercial film director Lee Zoo-young. Lee plays Jae-hoon, a successful fund manager who loses everything after investing in a risky bond. Deep in depression, he travels to Australia, where his wife, played by Gong Hyo-jin, and son have relocated.

From afar, the once shrewd Jae-hoon watches helplessly as his wife has an affair with her next door neighbor, smoking pot with the Australian day-laborer. 

The story had struck a chord within him, he said. “It was among the top five best scripts I had ever read, personally. It was a story that I had to tell. It was a like a really good novel.”

The film’s characters rarely speak. Jae-hoon spends most of his time wallowing in the consequences of his life, only interacting occasionally with a young backpacker in Australia on working holiday, played by the K-pop idol-turned-actress Ahn So-hee. She too has been hurt, but through brute physical violence. Most of Jae-hoon’s thoughts and emotions are delivered via facial expressions, rather than dialogue, which Lee found “intriguing.”

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Lee Byung-hun poses for a photo before an interview Monday at a cafe in Samcheong-dong, Seoul. (All That Cinema)

Since his debut in 1991, Lee has had a distinguished career. Long before venturing out to Hollywood as Storm Shadow in the 2009 “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra,” or as the knife-wielding gunslinger in last year’s “The Magnificent Seven,” Lee earned praise for his diverse performances.

His fame began to rise after the 2001 melodrama “Bungee Jumping of Their Own,” in which he portrayed a shy student of literature. A string of more charismatic, often frenzied roles followed: Lee turned into a villain in the 2008 “The Good, the Bad, the Weird,” Kim Jee-woon’s acclaimed eccentric spaghetti Western, and as a widower whose wife was killed by a psychopath in the 2010 “I Saw the Devil.”

In recent years, Lee has played a gangster with political ties in “Inside Men” and a ruthless mogul in “Master.” 

But what really draws the veteran performer to characters is the subtle and often layered emotions he finds in them, the 46-year-old actor said. 

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Lee Byung-hun poses for a photo before an interview Monday at a cafe in Samcheong-dong, Seoul. (All That Cinema)

“There’s a scene where Jae-hoon sits in front of the computer, calculating his assets and his debts, drinking,” he said. “He might think he wants to just die. But he’s not in a normal state. He’s drunk and emotionally agitated and depressed. I believe that’s not his truthful wish. It’s impulsive.”

After 26 years in his craft, Lee says there are still times when he feels a sense of euphoria.

“There are scenes where I act what I read on the script, but the emotion that’s conveyed is something completely unexpected. And unintentional,” he said. “Those moments are few, but euphoric.”

The film opened in theaters Wednesday.

By Rumy Doo (doo@heraldcorp.com)

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