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[Movie 2017] Single Rider 싱글라이더

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February 22, 2017

‘Single Rider’ explores what we have left behind

The film invites viewers to contemplate what is really important in life

Source: The Korea Herald

The man appeared to have everything: a well-paying job, a good reputation in his field, a beautiful wife and an adorable son. At precisely this moment, everything starts to crumble.

Director Lee Zoo-young’s feature film debut “Single Rider” invites the audience to take a look at a man’s life after he loses practically everything he has worked for.

“I wanted the audience to think about what we are giving up now for the promise of a future. ... There are so many things that we give up, and I wanted to tell a story through which we can think about what is truly important,” said Lee. 

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Lee Byung-hun stars in a scene from “Single Rider.” (Warner Brothers Korea)

Actor Lee Byung-hun plays Jae-hoon, a stockbroker who loses his fortune, friends and the trust of his clients after a risky investment goes abysmally wrong. 

The embattled protagonist leaves for Australia to find his family, only to discover they too are slipping out of his grasp. 

The rookie movie director shows off her skills through a “show, don’t tell” technique, demonstrated in her track record as a director of advertisements and music videos. What the flick lacks in dialogue, it more than makes up for through the movements and expressions of its actors, with veteran actor Lee leading the way. 

“This movie follows a man’s thoughts and emotions from the beginning to the end. (My acting) is in the subtle change in emotions and facial expressions, which is something that I’ve always wanted to try as an actor,” said the 46-year-old Lee. 

image

(Warner Brothers Korea)

Jae-hoon’s wife Su-jin, played by Gong Hyo-jin, is found to have rediscovered her passion for music that she gave up upon her marriage. 

Along with her deepening relationship with a friendly neighbor, she appears to have started down a path of which Jae-hoon is not a part. He watches helplessly from afar as those dearest to him drift away.

As Jae-hoon stalks his family, the camera shadows him every step of the way. 

“The camera work and the angle was set at Jae-hoon’s eye-level. I wanted the movie to be shot from a man’s point of view,” said director Lee. 

She added that shooting in Australia was a deliberate choice, to contrast with Seoul, which has the opposite season as it is in a different hemisphere.

In the foreign land, Jae-hoon’s midlife crisis takes place with him completely isolated from everyone else. All except Ji-na, a Korean student who develops a friendship with him after being swindled of all she earned working in the country. 

“When you get on the bus at five in the morning, you realize that people are saying you’re poor because you’re lazy. ... It’s all b***s***,” says penniless Ji-na, played by singer-turned-actress Ahn So-hee.

image

(Warner Brothers Korea)

The former idol singer, for the most part, holds her own against the talents of Lee and Gong. 

Ahn, whose acting career has been shaky so far, says her sharing many similar traits with her character has helped her focus.

“It’s a movie that helps me think, ‘What am I missing out on?’” she said.

The film is not kind to an audience looking for an immediate payoff, with the main characters acting in a frustrating -- or sometimes downright confusing -- fashion. 

It builds up toward the third act, where what had seemed a wild goose chase finally starts to make sense.

“The inaction by Jae-hoon builds up frustration, which means the big reveal in the climax can be cathartic,” said Gong. 

Director Lee challenges the audience to think about the true meaning of happiness and what really matters in life. 

“I hope this film will be a movie that people think about once in a while, even after it’s over. A movie that has a certain warmth to it,” she said.

By Yoon Min-sik
(minsikyoon@heraldcorp.com)

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Photo: hino2033 CGV 왕십리

Lee Byung-hun's presence .... Is there an actor who can express the tired loneliness better than this?

Photo: hino2033 CGV 왕십리

The possibility of Gong Hyo Jin is limitless ~~ ^^ # Good movie

 

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February 23, 2017

(Movie Review) 'Single Rider': a well-crafted film with lasting impression

(ATTN: UPDATES with more details in storyline in 5th para)

By Shim Sun-ah

SEOUL, Feb. 23 (Yonhap) -- "That flower / Which I could not see as I went up / I saw when I went down."

"A Single Rider," masterfully directed by first-time director Lee Joo-young, opens with this short poem titled "Flowers of a Moment" by renowned poet Ko Un. This perhaps best sums up the movie.

It asks ordinary people living in the modern world who are always busy with work, to pause and take time to think about themselves and what is the most important thing in their lives.

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actor Lee Byung-hun in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actor Lee Byung-hun in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

Kang Jae-hoon (played by Lee Byun-hun) is a middle-aged "goose father" who leads a fairly successful life as head of a regional branch of a stock trading company in Seoul. In South Korea, the term goose father refers to men who are left behind to work in the country to pay for their families who live and study abroad.

After a scandal surrounding an insolvent investment fund erupts, he falls from grace with his customers, friends and relatives who put their money in the fund on his recommendation. Feeling miserable and lonely, he travels to Australia alone to find consolation in being together with his wife Soo-jin (Kong Hyo-jin) and son.

But he once again becomes alone in the foreign land, realizing that there is no place for him in the family. He is shocked to discover that his wife has developed an intimate relationship with the man next door and starts watching her from a distance.

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actress Kong Hyo-jin in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actress Kong Hyo-jin in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actress An So-hee in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actress An So-hee in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

From here, director Lee starts following the man's devastating feelings of worthlessness, despair and sadness in a very calm manner without much dialogue.

Jae-hoon then gets a chance to look back on himself while developing a friendship with Ji-na (An So-hee), a young Korean backpacker in Australia on working holiday.

The film unleashes a storm of emotions from the very moment Jae-hoon confronts a shocking truth of life. Since it was hard to predict the reversal even for experienced viewers, it leaves you dizzy when the ending credits roll. The feelings of loneliness and sadness last long even after you leave the theater.

Actor Lee's delicate and sensitive performance is the film's prime asset. Although there is very little dialogue Jae-hoon's sad eyes and looks convey what is going on inside his mind.

Lee Joo-young, formerly an experienced TV commercial director, shot most of the film in Australia for the first time as a Korean filmmaker. So you can also enjoy the beautiful summer scenery of the country and tourist attractions, such as the Opera House, Harbour Bridge and Bondi Beach, in Sydney.

"A Single Rider" opened in local theaters Wednesday. It is the second Korean-language film produced and presented by Warner Bros.

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actor Lee Byung-hun in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image provided by Warner Bros. Korea shows actor Lee Byung-hun in a scene from "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

sshim@yna.co.kr

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February 23, 2017

Lee Byung Hun-Single Rider behind-the-scene captures released

Source: BH Entertainment via Sports Chosun

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Spoiler

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Korean fan-review at PlanetBH0712 // ELBH Google-translate

Single Rider Reported ^ ^ (No Spoiler) 

On a rainy afternoon, there were a lot more people than usual.
I was a little worried about how hard it would be to watch movies when the people around me were loud before the movie started.
Rather, everyone seemed to be breathing quietly and immersed - the power of SINGLE RIDER! haha

It was my first experience to be in the movie as soon as the movie was over.
I could not find the bathroom in the movie theater.

I also found my own scenes in the movie.
When I came back home, I did the laundry, and the scene came up and I really felt my tears welled up.
A delicate facial expression of the father made the thoughts linger on.

I really appreciate seeing A SINGLE RIDER.
I was glad to see you in the movie.
Thank you, precious movie, SINGLE RIDER ~ ^^ 

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Good words from Pierce Conran ^_^

February 23, 2017

Review: A SINGLE RIDER Subtly Ponders the Small Regrets of Life
Lee Byung-hun stars in a delicate melodrama, directed by Lee Zoo-yong.

By Pierce Conran ScreenAnarchy

A few months after the explosive period spy thriller The Age of Shadows from genre maestro Kim Jee-woon, Warner Bros is back with its second Korean production, A Single Rider. Though both films share star Lee Byung-hun, who appears as an extended cameo in Kim's work, A Single Rider, from debut filmmaker Lee Zoo-yong, is a far smaller work with only a handful of characters; it's largely concerned with the theme of regret.

Lee plays a top fund manager whose life falls to pieces when his company loses all its clients' savings. He decides to take a trip to Australia, where his wife lives with their son, in order for him to learn English. Upon his arrival, the husband discovers that his wife, a former violinist whose musical ambitions have begun to reawaken, has gotten very close with her Australian neighbor. During his trip, he also tries to help a young Korean girl who has been swindled out her savings during her work-abroad stay in the country.

A Single Rider doesn't exactly break new ground but its understated look at a man reconsidering what his life means in a society consumed with achievement is refreshing, precisely because it avoids tackling too many issues or devolving into hysterics, as many similar works have. Lee Zoo-young, a graduate of the Korea National University of Arts, mounts her debut with measured and quiet grace and knows exactly how to get the best out of her stars. Her choice to set most of the film Down Under proves a clever one, as the comfort and peace of suburbia lifestyle in Australia offers a way for us to see into the characters without being lost in the clutter of a more stressful Korean environment.

Prior to becoming the global superstar that he is today, appearing in Hollywood action tentpoles and major Korean thrillers, Lee Byung-hun was largely famous for being a star of melodramas, both in theaters and on television. For the first time since 2006's Once a Summer, Lee has returned to the realm where he started his career with A Single Rider. However, unlike the romantic leads he was accustomed to, his role here calls on him to deliver the most introspective and subtle work of his career. It's an expressive performance and a great showcase for Lee's range.

Though her role is quite small, Kong Hyo-jin follows her terrific part in E.oni's kdnap thriller Missing with another impressive turn. Her character is the suffering, silent type, and like Lee she demonstrates control over her mannerisms and allows us to peer in through the occasional richard simmons in her calm exterior. She's far more famous for her TV and modeling work, but given her consistently strong parts in smaller film roles, one hopes we'll see more of her on the big screen in the future. A Single Rider also marks the fifth different female director that Kong has worked with, surely a record for a major Korean star.

The film also fits in with the recent run of Korean films dealing with the rampant corruption of the haves of society at the expense of the have-nots. Lee was last seen in the big-budget film Master, in which he also plays someone in the finance industry who swindles normal people out of their life savings, though unlike the ponzi scheme mastermind of the prior work, here his character may not have been aware of the consequences of his actions, or at the very least may have forced his conscience to look the other way.

The regret he feels for his actions is what leads him into the subplot of the young Korean woman, played adequately by Kpop star Ahn So-hee, who can't hope to measure up to the film's seasoned lead. Helping here recover her savings may offer some form of absolution for Lee's character.

A Single Rider is likely to be appreciated by its intended audience, even if it's not a very big one these days, as feature melodrama (as opposed to that seen on TV) seems to have lost favor with Korean viewers. However, due to its delicate tone and slight narrative, even fans may not recall this quiet little work long after seeing it. 

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February 24, 2017

New movies to battle out for weekend box office

This image, provided by Warner Bros. Korea, is a poster "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

This image, provided by Warner Bros. Korea, is a poster "A Single Rider." (Yonhap)

SEOUL, Feb. 24 (Yonhap) -- New movies of diverse genres including thriller, drama and action will compete for the top spot in the local box office this weekend, an official box-office tracker said Friday.

American psychological thriller "Split," which premiered here on Wednesday, topped the local box office on the day of its release and is riding a huge wave of popularity, according to Korean Film Council (KOFIC).

Helmed by director M. Night Shyamalan, the film follows a man with 23 different personalities who kidnaps three girls. Much attention has been drawn to whether the film will continue its reign over the weekend.

Three homegrown films are also set to attract moviegoers' attention.

The courtroom drama "New Trial," which also topped the local box office on its Wednesday opening day, is the runner-up with an accumulated viewer count of 1,447,731 as of Thursday.

The movie, spearheaded by director Kim Tae-yoon, tells the story of Hyun-woo, the only witness to a taxi driver's murder, who spends 10 years in prison after he is falsely accused of the crime. He gains hope as he meets Joon-young, his advocate as well as a lawyer in debt.

This image, provided by Opus Pictures, is a poster for the South Korean movie "New Trial." (Yonhap)

This image, provided by Opus Pictures, is a poster for the South Korean movie "New Trial." (Yonhap)

Also competing to top the weekend box office is "A Single Rider" featuring top-billed actor Lee Byung-hun. The movie is currently at No. 3, pushing the crime-action thriller "Fabricated City" to fourth place.

In "A Single Rider," Lee plays a branch manager of a securities company who loses everything after a scandal surrounding an insolvent investment fund erupts. Feeling miserable and lonely, he flies to Australia to meet his family only to find out that his wife has developed an intimate relationship with another man. The movie has received rave reviews for the actor's delicate, sensitive performance as well as rookie director Lee Joo-young's careful projection of emotions backed by a strong script.

The action flick "Fabricated City" directed by Park Kwang-hyun took fourth place on the daily chart. It stars actor Ji Chang-wook as Gwon-yu, a jobless gaming addict who endeavors to uncover the truth behind a rape-murder case after being framed as the perpetrator.

deserts@yna.co.kr

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Photo: warnerbros.korea

"Lee Byung Hun X Gong Hyo Jin X An So Hee"
SINGLE RIDER Three actors finally appearing talk live
.
Tonight (2/25) 8:00 pm 
# Live on the Naver # V app
# Commemorative _ live # live room
.
# Single rider # showing praise

COMING SOON! WATCH THE STREAMING OF 'SINGLE RIDER V LIVE'

TODAY 25/2 AT 7.00 PM SEOUL TIME

PLEASE CLICK ON LINK 

http://www.vlive.tv/video/23790/이병헌X공효진X안소희-싱글라이더--V-라이브-A-single-rider--V-LIVE

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February 24, 2017

[Box Office] Movies in theaters this week

Source: The Korea Herald

20170223001039_0.jpg

A Single Rider (Korea)

Opened Feb. 22
Drama. Directed by Lee Zoo-young

Jae-hoon (Lee Byung-hun) is a stockbroker who loses his fortune, friends and the trust of his clients after a risky investment goes abysmally wrong. He leaves for Australia to find his wife and son, who have relocated there, only to discover that they too are slipping out of his grasp. He hovers around them, observing their daily routine and wandering the streets in search of answers to a horrifying truth.

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