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Study Abroad In Korea?

little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss troublewest jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
edited January 2009 in school zone
all questions answered here!
[edit]
since starting this thread a LOT of people have been asking questions that no one can answer.
if you want to know SPECIFIC questions ASK YOUR SCHOOL'S INTERNATIONAL OFFICE!!!!

things that you should ask at your school's international office:
- scholarship advice
- course advice (ie- whether credits will match up or not)
- what study abroad programs are offered
- cost
- study abroad term

DON'T BE LAZY! no one here knows whether or not community college students can do study abroad, no one knows how much money your program costs, no one know what scholarships you are elegible for, no one knows how you can transfer to a university in korea.

these are the types of questions you should direct to YOUR SCHOOL or the KOREAN UNIVERSITY!!!

i thought that this was obvious, but these types of questions have come up SO MUCH that i thought i better put this on the top post and hope that no one asks.

there's no problem with asking about someone's experience in korea, the type of classes they took, etc.
but don't ask questions like "my school doesn't offer study abroad in korea, how can i go there?". I DON'T KNOW! ASK YOUR SCHOOL FOR ADVICE.

thank you. (edited jan 3 '09)


since there's so many ppl that are interested in doing study abroad in korea, i thought it might just be easier to make a topic for it.
that way ppl that have done the programs can write up their views, and ppl that have questions about the program can READ them through, then make a decision and/or ask questions about things that weren't addressed in other posters points about the program...

i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
tahoora
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Replies

  • hello_se7enhello_se7en CAPosts: 299Member
    hmm...i visited a friend that did a program like that but she went to ehwa. the place seemed pretty clean and nice...but i'm not so sure about the classes...
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  • ChiyoriChiyori Sydney, AustraliaPosts: 396Member
    edited November 2005
    so the general idea is SNU has bad international student services whilst Yonsei has better int. services?

    I'm considering going to SNU for exchange in 2007. I'm not native korean.. i plan to study my Richard Simmons off and pass that proficiency test! I should be taking Korean language classes when i'm there though so.. guess not a lot of my classes will actually be lectured in korean. Anywho.. you mentioned dorms are bad quality? MAN.. i'm gonna go check them out this winter then..
    'I have never hated a man enough to give back his diamonds' - Zsa Zsa Gabor
  • little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss trouble west jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
    my experience with yonsei's summer program

    i went through younsei's summer session (DIEE) in 2003 & 2004.

    in 2003, the ppl in the dorm were terrible. 90%+ of the kids there were korean-americans, and many of them were visibly NOT happy about having non-koreans in their midst.
    i got ppl saying stuff like "what are YOU doing here?" as if i had no right to go to korea to learn korean.

    most the korean-americans hung out together and actively excluded anyone that was not korean-american or 1/2 korean.

    many...most of them had sh*tty korean, and would try to make up for it by mumbling and swearing a lot in korean.

    the teachers were nice and the security guards also were nice.
    actually, i had more fun with the koreans (locals) than korean-americans.

    in 2004 when i went, it was much better (but still not great).
    the summer session is really about "korean-american bonding time". and because of that, i ACTIVELY encourage NON-KOREANS to apply for the summer session.

    of course both times i went i met nice korean-americans, but a lot of them are just rude to non-koreans (this includes non-korean asian-americans).

    anyways, this 2nd time i went, there were more non-koreans and some of us were able to hang out.

    in terms of classes:
    mon, tues, thurs & fri you have class. wed is a no-class day...for some random reason...
    the korean language class is 3 hrs long. the 1st hr is like reading, 2nd is grammar, 3rd is speaking (something like that) with a 10 min break between each hour. and it's everyday (except wed of course).

    you don't *have* to take a korean class, they have a number of other classes avaliable, all taught in english. though, be warned that some teachers of the other non-korean lang classes don't have the best english (so i heard) so, you'll have to put a bit more effort into learning.

    if you're going to take a korean class, they give you a placement exam.
    they tell you that the exam places you lower than what you might have expected. but, you can always move up or down as you please.

    the exam starts out with some simple stuff then gets harder and harder.
    in my case, there were grammar patterns that i knew, but i didn't know the vocab around the grammar so i couldn't understand what was going on.
    there's also a speaking portion.
    basically the lady is going to ask you stuff like "what's your name?" "where are you from?" "what time did you wake up this morning?" etc.
    honestly, i didn't know the answers so some questions even in english cuz i just straight up forgot.

    if you are a complete beginner, they have a beginner class.
    it sounds like the class starts off in english, but then the teachers just switch mostly to korean...and some ppl felt that they didn't really learn anything.

    some korean-americans might have good/OK speaking skills, but can't write worth Richard Simmons.
    if that's you, and you're put in a lower class, don't get an attitude about it.
    it's no fun to be in a class with ppl who don't want to be there.
    it's not my fault that you didn't want to take saturday korean lang classes as a kid, so don't get an attitude with non-koreans who know more about korean grammar than you.
    along with that, if you are a non-korean taking korean, the korean teachers expect you to know the grammar better than korean-american students...and sometimes explicitly tell the class that.

    so if that's you, non-korean person, try to work on your speaking skills!

    there's a buddy program in the summer and during the regular year.
    i never did it, but it could be a good way to meet local koreans, and many local koreans are eagar to show non-koreans (and korean-americans) around and introduce them to korean culture.

    i'll write more later...i'm getting tired.
    i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
    Panda_Lulu
  • SystemSystem Posts: 44,632

    ADMIN

    edited December 2013
    You need someone who is compassionate and determined to to be proficient in the areas they serve. , executive office chairs, 8DD,
  • little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss trouble west jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
    ^ it's not too bad.
    like i said, i'll write more later haha~
    i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
  • hello_se7enhello_se7en CAPosts: 299Member
    hmm sounds kinda interesting actually...i was thinking of joining the yonsei program...thanks for the info.
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  • preciouskoreanpreciouskorean Posts: 113Member
    i want to study abroad at maybe yonsei [have friends there] but i'm not sure when the best time would be to go ...
  • my_love_shymy_love_shy just a simple girl in a crazy world try to find me if you canPosts: 1,491Member
    so if you want to study abroad. how long would you stay? a month, a year? just wondering. and expenses. do you have your own money to pay for living expenses? sounds really interesting to me. i'd reallyl like to go.
    *~*How can you love one person and not become mean? With a kind heart, you have to love the whole world, so to love one thing, you can’t be nice. I want be cruel and love one person. -Ireland*~*To believe in the unbelievable, that is what trust is"*~*when tomorrow starts without me don't think we're far apart, For every time you think of me I'm right here, in urheart.*~*Listen to your heart. Even though it's on the left side, it's always right.*~*ever since I met you, nobody else is even worth thinking about.*~*
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  • dutsukyampudutsukyampu Posts: 400Member
    QUOTE(little mixed girl @ Nov 20 2005, 05:36 PM) »

    my experience with yonsei's summer program

    i went through younsei's summer session (DIEE) in 2003 & 2004.

    in 2003, the ppl in the dorm were terrible. 90%+ of the kids there were korean-americans, and many of them were visibly NOT happy about having non-koreans in their midst.
    i got ppl saying stuff like "what are YOU doing here?" as if i had no right to go to korea to learn korean.

    most the korean-americans hung out together and actively excluded anyone that was not korean-american or 1/2 korean.

    many...most of them had sh*tty korean, and would try to make up for it by mumbling and swearing a lot in korean.

    the teachers were nice and the security guards also were nice.
    actually, i had more fun with the koreans (locals) than korean-americans.

    in 2004 when i went, it was much better (but still not great).
    the summer session is really about "korean-american bonding time". and because of that, i ACTIVELY encourage NON-KOREANS to apply for the summer session.

    of course both times i went i met nice korean-americans, but a lot of them are just rude to non-koreans (this includes non-korean asian-americans).

    anyways, this 2nd time i went, there were more non-koreans and some of us were able to hang out.

    in terms of classes:
    mon, tues, thurs & fri you have class. wed is a no-class day...for some random reason...
    the korean language class is 3 hrs long. the 1st hr is like reading, 2nd is grammar, 3rd is speaking (something like that) with a 10 min break between each hour. and it's everyday (except wed of course).

    you don't *have* to take a korean class, they have a number of other classes avaliable, all taught in english. though, be warned that some teachers of the other non-korean lang classes don't have the best english (so i heard) so, you'll have to put a bit more effort into learning.

    if you're going to take a korean class, they give you a placement exam.
    they tell you that the exam places you lower than what you might have expected. but, you can always move up or down as you please.

    the exam starts out with some simple stuff then gets harder and harder.
    in my case, there were grammar patterns that i knew, but i didn't know the vocab around the grammar so i couldn't understand what was going on.
    there's also a speaking portion.
    basically the lady is going to ask you stuff like "what's your name?" "where are you from?" "what time did you wake up this morning?" etc.
    honestly, i didn't know the answers so some questions even in english cuz i just straight up forgot.

    if you are a complete beginner, they have a beginner class.
    it sounds like the class starts off in english, but then the teachers just switch mostly to korean...and some ppl felt that they didn't really learn anything.

    some korean-americans might have good/OK speaking skills, but can't write worth Richard Simmons.
    if that's you, and you're put in a lower class, don't get an attitude about it.
    it's no fun to be in a class with ppl who don't want to be there.
    it's not my fault that you didn't want to take saturday korean lang classes as a kid, so don't get an attitude with non-koreans who know more about korean grammar than you.
    along with that, if you are a non-korean taking korean, the korean teachers expect you to know the grammar better than korean-american students...and sometimes explicitly tell the class that.

    so if that's you, non-korean person, try to work on your speaking skills!

    there's a buddy program in the summer and during the regular year.
    i never did it, but it could be a good way to meet local koreans, and many local koreans are eagar to show non-koreans (and korean-americans) around and introduce them to korean culture.

    i'll write more later...i'm getting tired.


    native koreans ask why twinkies are in there country too.
    twinkies actually think they'll be fully accepted in korea. their accents are hilarious too
  • charcoalcharcoal New YorkPosts: 6Member
    edited November 2005
    i want to study in yonsei for the whole year. my home university requires that i take 18 units per semester if i study at yonsei. im a business major. ill be there for my sophomore year if i can go. please tell me the name and course number of yonsei classes that are equivalent to the following UC classes so I know what classes i can take at yonsei that can be counted toward my UC college breadth requirements:
    STAT 48 - Statistics for business
    PSYC 11 - Psychological Methods: Statistical Procedures
    ANTH 175B - Anthropological Research: Specialized Techniques
    ECON 111 - Research Methods in Business and Economics
    PSYC 12 - Psychological Methods: Research Procedures
    SOC 4 - Methods of Sociological Inquiry -- Formerly SOC 110A (Prerequisite SOC 1)
    BSAD 10 - Intro. to Business
    BSAD 20A - Principles of Accounting I
    BSAD 20B - Principles of Accounting II
    HIST 10 - WORLD HISTORY:PREHISTORY TO 1500
    HIST 20 - WORLD HISTORY: TWENTIETH CENTURY

    I need to take these classes at yonsei if i don't want to be one year behind when i get back to america the year after.

    Thank you, anyone who can help me.
  • soymilksoymilk Posts: 785Friend of Soompi

    ROOKIE

    this is interesting. i want to study art abroad in korea. but i dont know the langauge. thats the problem for me.
    squarebubblex
  • Gemini_ChicahGemini_Chicah Canada =)Posts: 120Member

    ROOKIE

    Me and my friends were planning on going for the exchange program at Yonsei University but after reading some of the comments, I'm not too sure about going to that university for the program anymore.

    Has anyone gone to Korea University to take the summer korean language course by any chance? Anything about experiences, the quality of the teaching and course would be really appreciated =)
    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. - Oscar Wilde

  • kittenmaskskittenmasks Posts: 595Member
    QUOTE(charcoal @ Nov 22 2005, 08:50 PM) »

    i want to study in yonsei for the whole year. my home university requires that i take 18 units per semester if i study at yonsei. im a business major. ill be there for my sophomore year if i can go. please tell me the name and course number of yonsei classes that are equivalent to the following UC classes so I know what classes i can take at yonsei that can be counted toward my UC college breadth requirements:
    STAT 48 - Statistics for business
    PSYC 11 - Psychological Methods: Statistical Procedures
    ANTH 175B - Anthropological Research: Specialized Techniques
    ECON 111 - Research Methods in Business and Economics
    PSYC 12 - Psychological Methods: Research Procedures
    SOC 4 - Methods of Sociological Inquiry -- Formerly SOC 110A (Prerequisite SOC 1)
    BSAD 10 - Intro. to Business
    BSAD 20A - Principles of Accounting I
    BSAD 20B - Principles of Accounting II
    HIST 10 - WORLD HISTORY:PREHISTORY TO 1500
    HIST 20 - WORLD HISTORY: TWENTIETH CENTURY

    I need to take these classes at yonsei if i don't want to be one year behind when i get back to america the year after.

    Thank you, anyone who can help me.


    Instead of being lazy, I suggest you get yourself on their webpage and/or start emailing the undergraduate office to help you. What makes you think everyone else's time isn't as precious as yours?



    I went on the summer program for Yonsein in the summer of 2003 (KLI) and had an awesome time. Two of my friends were non Korean-American and they both said they had great times. One is half-Korean, half white. My other friend is 1/4 Korean, and 3/4 African-American. Neither of them had much of a problem, but that might have been because they hung out with me and my roommate (we are both fluent in Korean and English). I think the people you meet and hang out with correlates directly with your experience. Honestly, the four of us pretty much did our own thing the entire time we were there. We never really hung out very much with the kids from our program.

    One thing that I would recommend trying out if you get the chance are dance classes at Nana Dance Academy. We met a lot of Korean celebrities there. It's located in Shin-chon, very convenient location from Yonsei. (To be precise, it's on the second floor of the movie theater near Ewha area... near the huge McDonald's.) It's also a good place to meet other people. When I was there, there were two other girls from the U.S. and our dance teacher was so awesome. Lee So Eun (the singer) was also in our class, and she speaks decent English.

    elevatormusic
  • little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss trouble west jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
    ^ was the black/korean girl a soompi member by any chance?
    i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
  • little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss trouble west jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
    yonsei continued

    the dorm that most summer students stay in is the International House 국제학사.

    it has about 4 floors, but i think the 4th floor is closed to students or somethinglike that...
    if you're going to apply for the 2006 summer program, get your dorm $$ in early. cuz there are ppl that have to stay in off campus housing and commute.
    and did i mention that you have to find the housing yourself?

    for the most part the rooms/dorm is pretty nice.

    the basement has a laundry room (washers/dryers). it's a first come first serve type of thing. while i didn't have any of my clothing stolen, i did have ppl decide to take my clothes out of the dryer so that they could use it image

    there's also a basement lounge with 2 tvs, couches, tables, microwave, karaoke, sink, and 2 vending machines.

    the dorm set-up is split between a girls and boys side.
    guys are not allowed to go to the girls side and vice versa (family members are the exception).
    if you are caught sneaking in a person of the opposite sex to your dorm side you WILL be kicked outta the dorm.
    no joking, they have video cameras to watch your every move, and while the security guards are old, they are not stupid.

    someone tried to put a wig on a guy or something and bring him in...kicked out.
    some guy tried to cover a girl in a big shirt and sneak her in..kicked out.

    and they do post your name on a bulletin board with the reason why you were kicked out.

    that's not to say that guys and girls can't meet in the dorm, the 1st floor and basement are common areas.

    but where the rooms are, that's a no-no.

    speaking of the rooms, they are basically the same as the rooms in the states.
    2 beds for 2 ppl. a wardrobe, a desk and some shelves on the walls.
    there is a heater and a/c.
    and there's a cable for internet, but you have to get that all set up.

    the bathrooms are ok.

    if you didn't know, in korea you're not supposed to flush your toilet paper down the toilet.
    instead you ball it up and throw it into a little trash bin next to the toilet.

    yes, i was freaked out by it also.
    if you are uncomfortable with that (like me) then what i suggest is that you strategically use the tp and flush often.
    if you pull off 1/2 a roll to wipe your azz and throw it all in the toilet, it's gonna clog up a korean toilet.
    the toilets can handle tp, just not a massive ammount (hence flush often).

    and while ppl don't want to hear about it, your Richard Simmons...aka ddong is probably going to clog up the toilet at some point.
    some suggestions:
    -just clog up the toilet like you don't care (enough ppl do this).
    -ration the poo. only let out so much at a time, and flush often.
    -poo in a plastic bag and throw the bag in the garbage.
    -don't poo for however long u are in the program.
    -poo in the woods.

    diahreaa(sp) of course, will always easily go down.

    girls, when you are you know *cough*.... image

    ...and you obviously don't want to toss that in the trash can, you don't have to.
    like i said, strategic use and flush often.

    this is all thrown out the door if you use a squat toilet though...cuz you just can't put tp in there...

    lucky for you, there are no squat toilets in the dorms.

    the showers....hmm....

    there's basically a plastic curtain that you slide open to get to the shower part of the bathroom.
    there's a little area where you can put your towel or clothes or whatever...but if a lotta ppl are using the shower there's not much room to put anything.
    except for the wet floor...

    there are individual shower stalls that are divided by frosted glass (meaning that you shouldn't press your azz up against the glass lest someone gets a glance) and you can see the person next to you.
    can't see them clearly enough to see their nono areas...but yeah...
    there's no shower door, but again, that plastic curtain.
    so...you'll have to find the best way to close it off.

    there's like, 1 drain for the whole shower, so...girls expecially beware of your hair.

    mmm....more to come later.
    i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
    Panda_Lulu
  • kittenmaskskittenmasks Posts: 595Member
    Yeah, I still keep in touch with her. We live in approximate distance to each other so we see each other pretty often. At least once a year. And our colleges are huggeeeee rivals when it comes to footballs, so we try to make each other's games.



    One other thing I found inconvenient in Korea was the lack of tampons. I don't know if this has been fixed since 2003, but it was like hell trying to find tampons.

  • charcoalcharcoal New YorkPosts: 6Member
    edited November 2005
    QUOTE(jeanhee @ Nov 23 2005, 03:44 AM) »

    Instead of being lazy, I suggest you get yourself on their webpage and/or start emailing the undergraduate office to help you. What makes you think everyone else's time isn't as precious as yours?

    Good idea about emailing them, thank you. Is this what you did to find your classes?
    Do you have any other suggestions about the application process?
  • little mixed girllittle mixed girl little miss trouble west jaPanPosts: 4,604Member, Friend of Soompi
    QUOTE(jeanhee @ Nov 23 2005, 04:05 PM) »

    Yeah, I still keep in touch with her. We live in approximate distance to each other so we see each other pretty often. At least once a year. And our colleges are huggeeeee rivals when it comes to footballs, so we try to make each other's games.
    One other thing I found inconvenient in Korea was the lack of tampons. I don't know if this has been fixed since 2003, but it was like hell trying to find tampons.

    lol.... image
    i dun wear tampons so... image image image

    QUOTE(charcoal @ Nov 23 2005, 04:27 PM) »

    Good idea about emailing them, thank you. Is this what you did to find your classes?
    Do you have any other suggestions about the application process?

    personally, i just took whatever i wanted. but that's why i went during the summer.
    you should probably talk with a counselor/someone in the study abroad office and they can tell you if the credits transfer or not.
    every university is different in that area.
    i write an important thing, and do not let's finish. a way of writing for freedom.
  • dutsukyampudutsukyampu Posts: 400Member
    and the truth ^_~
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