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Joo Won 주원 [Upcoming Movie "Carter" 2021]


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23 minutes ago, kittyna said:

A good number of performing artists are introverts, actually - although I don't know if anyone's ever done a statistical analysis. If nothing else, performing is one way an introvert could open him/herself up to an audience, since their actual art (whether it's acting, music, dance, etc.) gives viewers something to focus on outside of the artist's own person.

Now that you mention it, a lot of famous actors come under introvert category, in Hollywood it is Leonardo, in south Korea k-dramas our joo won and kim Soo-Hyun and some extent Lee Min-Ho(But when it comes to women he is in extrovert mode:P). I think this because introverts tend to enjoy their alone time more than spending time with crowd, so all that suppressed human expressions some out in the form of art(like acting,singing or musical performance)

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3 hours ago, kittyna said:

And I'm just sharing this tribute to both the Japanese and Korean versions of Nodame Cantabile/Nae Il's Cantabile. Why? Just because I like it :) 

I like how your posts are sometimes self-explanatory(you ask the question and you answer it):tounge_xd:

I might add, those three look identical and Japanese actor can his doppelganger :tounge_xd:

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2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Now that you mention it, a lot of famous actors come under introvert category, in Hollywood it is Leonardo, in south Korea k-dramas our joo won and kim Soo-Hyun and some extent Lee Min-Ho(But when it comes to women he is in extrovert mode:P).

 

If you mean Leonardo DiCaprio, I do have to point out that while I hadn't known he was an introvert in real life, it's interesting that I have seen a couple of K-drama fans comparing JW to him. Both of them started off like any other pretty face/teenage heartthrob, but have since moved on to becoming well known as versatile and highly skilled actors in their own right :) 

 

As for other introverted Korean actors, I can also add Lee Jong Suk to the list :) 

 

Anyway, I'm actually here to quickly drop my responses to the survey I posted the other day. This does NOT mean the round is over, however. I plan to officially move on to Round Two early next week, so you'll have until Sunday, May 31 to add your response as well.

 

Spoiler

1. Who do you think would be a better dad?

A - Park Si On - 3

B - Lee Kang To - 1

 

I don't think parenting would come easily to either Si On or Kang To, but if it's a contest, I do think Si On would edge out in front.

 

Si On's naturally caring and nurturing personality will definitely come into play here; I can see him throwing himself into providing for his kids' needs and trying to do everything he can to keep them happy. He'd be the fun and playful parent, but I can imagine he'd run into issues when it comes to disciplining or scolding his kids if they ever misbehaved (not that he wouldn't do it, but he'd look so darn cute when he's angry that it's hard to imagine any child taking him seriously then).

 

As for Kang To, if you peel back his more gruff and aggressive exterior, we do see that he's extremely loyal and devoted to those he loves. However, I think the biggest obstacle Kang To would face is the fact that he's already been hurt so many times in his life; having lost his entire family, the woman he loved, and his best friend by this point...I can imagine that he'd just be reluctant to find love and start a family anytime soon. Especially if he thinks that his own days are numbered - which they are, since he's going to be a wanted fugitive as long as the Japanese are still in power. Even on the off chance that he does become a father, I think he'd be reluctant to really fully commit into the role, considering just how much is at stake; and the ones who'd suffer for that emotional unavailability in the long run would be said kids.

 

2. Who do you think would be a better dad?

A - Gyun Woo - 1

B - Kim Tae Hyun - 3

 

Lol - This one was the tough one, but I didn't want to just add to the tie either :P So just know that even though Tae Hyun wins for me, he's only doing so by a hair. And the criterion I ultimately use here is that Gyun Woo is predominantly book-smart, while Tae Hyun is more street-smart.

 

Gyun Woo was raised by a father whose parenting style was strongly influenced by Confucian philosophy, and we see how that affects his life and values as an adult. I think he'd use a similar approach in dealing with his own kids: giving them a strong moral/ethical foundation that he hopes would guide them throughout their lives. He'd also work hard at balancing between encouraging/praising his kids and disciplining them. However, I think he'd have a hard time dealing with any behavioural problems that might arise: not from lack of caring or interest, but simply because he himself was a relatively well-behaved child who's only really had to teach yet another relatively well-behaved child (the young Prince). So if the child ends up mischievous or hanging with the wrong crowd, he'd be rather lost.

 

And it's on this last point where I think Tae Hyun just manages to edge out in front. Unlike Gyun Woo, he's someone who grew up in a bad environment, but proactively chose to go straight instead. I think that means he'd be better equipped to guide his kids through dealing with unfair circumstances, peer pressure, negative influences coming from outside, etc. - all those things that could cause children of even the most well-meaning parents to go astray.

 

3. Who do you think would be a better dad?

A - Hwang Tae Hui - 3

B - Han Gil Ro - 1

 

This one's the clearest contest for me. While I can see Han Gil Ro as being the fun/cool dad who's really affectionate towards his kids, he'd have a hard time with a lot of the nitty gritty stuff that comes with raising a family. As for Tae Hui, he's the quietly dependable and responsible type to begin with, and we can see from his interactions with his nephew that, although awkward at times, he is able to build up a strong rapport with kids if he needs to. I also think that, out of all 8 characters here, Tae Hui would be one of the best at balancing love and discipline.

 

4. Who do you think would be a better dad?

A - Gu Ma Jun - 1

B - Cha Yoo Jin - 3

 

While both Ma Jun and Yoo Jin had somewhat dysfunctional relationships with their own fathers, I think Yoo Jin's been more successful in letting go of that emotional baggage. Yoo Jin's been quick to develop a leadership style that Nae Il actually describes as being very parental in nature: stern, but in such a way that those under him (i.e. the orchestra members or, in this scenario, his kids) could sense that he's got their best interests at heart. However, he'd have to work hard not to repeat some of the mistakes he made at the beginning, where, with only his father and Professor Do to go by as examples, he'd been too harsh and critical with Nae Il or the S Orchestra. As long as he's careful about that, he'd be fine.

 

As for Ma Jun, it's great to see him finally starting to grow up and mature by the end of the drama, but it does mean that we as viewers don't really get much of a chance to see what the new-and-improved version of his character would be like. If we go with the earlier version of him, though, then he'd definitely have problems making sure not to let his own past emotional baggage bleed into his own parenting.

 

So, here's what the accumulated points are so far:

 

Spoiler

Park Si On - 6

Lee Kang To - 2

Gyun Woo - 3

Kim Tae Hyun - 5

Hwang Tae Hui - 6

Han Gil Ro - 2

Gu Ma Jun - 3

Cha Yoo Jin - 5

 

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18 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I might add, those three look identical and Japanese actor can his doppelganger :tounge_xd:

 

And now apparently there's a Chinese version that I somehow wasn't aware of:

 

nodame cantabile chinese remake

 

lol - It would be interesting to compare all three versions of the main characters (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese) side by side. But I don't think I'd be the right person to do it, since I'm already too biased towards the Korean version ;) 

 

I don't know if I'd ever think of JW and Hiroshi Tamaki (i.e. the Japanese actor) as doppelgangers, though - from the pictures of Nodame Cantabile I've seen, Hiroshi Tamaki actually reminds me more of a combination between Ji Sung and Park Ki Woong in his general features, facial proportions, etc. Weird comparison, I know, but ever since I thought that once, I could never un-see it again, so it's stuck in my head now :P 

 

Nor can I say I really see JW/Cha Yoo Jin in the anime pics - like I said, I do appear to be biased towards the Korean version already. So I guess I just see Cha Yoo Jin as, well, Cha Yoo Jin, and not really in comparison with Chiaki Shinichi (Japanese) or Li Zhen Yi (Chinese).

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27 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Ji Sung and Park Ki Woong in his general features, facial proportions, etc. Weird comparison, I know, but ever since I thought that once, I could never un-see it again, so it's stuck in my head now :P 

Weird indeed, Park ki Woong looks and personality is quite different from Ji sung, but from your point of view, if we kind of fuse them physically,perhaps, the outcome of physical appearance would be Hiroshi Tamaki:D

30 minutes ago, kittyna said:

lol - It would be interesting to compare all three versions of the main characters (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese) side by side. But I don't think I'd be the right person to do it, since I'm already too biased towards the Korean version ;) 

I don't know about Chinese version, but Japanese version the main lead was quite blatant, I mean for the comic purpose it was fun to watch, like hitting the female lead(in comedic way) and openly cursing, but the comedy in korean version was bit subtly and I felt they comedy was taken down a notch, I think they tried to satisfy both Japanese fans with comedy angle and Korean fans with love angle, and messed it up:dissapointed:

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3 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Weird indeed, Park ki Woong looks and personality is quite different from Ji sung, but from your point of view, if we kind of fuse them physically,perhaps, the outcome of physical appearance would be Hiroshi Tamaki:D

 

I know :lol: Like, I thought that, went, "Wait, what?", and then wound up with it getting stuck in my head.

 

3 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I don't know about Chinese version, but Japanese version the main lead was quite blatant, I mean for the comic purpose it was fun to watch, like hitting the female lead(in comedic way) and openly cursing, but the comedy in korean version was bit subtly and I felt they comedy was taken down a notch, I think they tried to satisfy both Japanese fans with comedy angle and Korean fans with love angle, and messed it up:dissapointed:

 

I will admit that I feel like the stylist for the Chinese version missed a memo somewhere, because I've never seen a coat like what the male lead's wearing before in any sort of classical music-related context - looks more steampunk than anything else. But that's just me being nit-picky. :P 

 

In terms of the comedy, I did sense that Japanese and Korean styles of comedy/humour might be different, since it's really obvious in Nae Il's Cantabile which comic scenes were filmed first as references to the Japanese version, and which ones came afterwards. I do want to give kudos to the production team, however, for making the music festival a more visible turning point in Nae Il's portrayal in particular - seeing her be more over-the-top and "extra" before then and starting to tone it down afterward (as she becomes aware of Yoo Jin's impending graduation, study abroad, etc.) made a lot of sense, in my opinion.

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10 hours ago, kittyna said:

In terms of the comedy, I did sense that Japanese and Korean styles of comedy/humour might be different, since it's really obvious in Nae Il's Cantabile which comic scenes were filmed first as references to the Japanese version, and which ones came afterwards. I do want to give kudos to the production team, however, for making the music festival a more visible turning point in Nae Il's portrayal in particular - seeing her be more over-the-top and "extra" before then and starting to tone it down afterward (as she becomes aware of Yoo Jin's impending graduation, study abroad, etc.) made a lot of sense, in my opinion.

Now that you mention it, Japanese version as more comedy angle in its series and Korean version emphasized more on musical angel, like it was proper musical series. In Japanese version there was hardly any orchestra, there were few performance but for limited screen time, in Korean version some times whole episode is dedicated to musical performance :D

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8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Now that you mention it, Japanese version as more comedy angle in its series and Korean version emphasized more on musical angel, like it was proper musical series. In Japanese version there was hardly any orchestra, there were few performance but for limited screen time, in Korean version some times whole episode is dedicated to musical performance

 

That's interesting - since I've heard the opposite. I remember seeing comments from people who've watched both versions saying that the Korean version tended to cut musical performances short (e.g. showing a bit from the beginning of a piece, then cutting to the end), whereas the Japanese version's musical numbers were more complete. And there is some credence to that: I could find, say, a 10-minute clip of a single concert from the Japanese drama, but you never really get those in the Korean one. 

 

One such example below - by the way, I just want to say that there is a marked difference between Nodame and Nae Il's piano-playing styles here.

 

 

So now your comment makes me wonder: does the Japanese version not show as much of the behind-the-scenes stuff that goes into studying and performing music compared to the Korean version? Like, is that where the difference in screen time is?

 

Because while performance segments were short in Nae Il's Cantabile, there was a lot of that: politics within the school's administration, especially its effect on funding, performance opportunities, etc. (I know some viewers complained about that, but it does happen for real); practice sessions/rehearsals; musicians struggling with lack of confidence , injuries, less-than-stellar results, etc. For me, that's part of what made Nae Il's Cantabile a musical drama: it showed not only the music, but also a lot of the stuff that musicians normally deal with to make it happen.

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2 hours ago, kittyna said:

That's interesting - since I've heard the opposite. I remember seeing comments from people who've watched both versions saying that the Korean version tended to cut musical performances short (e.g. showing a bit from the beginning of a piece, then cutting to the end), whereas the Japanese version's musical numbers were more complete. And there is some credence to that: I could find, say, a 10-minute clip of a single concert from the Japanese drama, but you never really get those in the Korean one. 

I do agree that there was lack of research when it comes to Korean version, I did find the musical postures of characters a bit bland , but Japanese version it was more expression and felt lively while watching it. But I think over dramatization made series of Japanese version more musical in nature.

 

2 hours ago, kittyna said:

One such example below - by the way, I just want to say that there is a marked difference between Nodame and Nae Il's piano-playing styles here

By the way Nodame cantabile has 2 movies and 2 drama series:astonished:,no wonder people find Korean version inferior to Japanese version, maybe that's the reason why people find it had more musical angle. And also, if we add the movies and series of the Nodame cantabile it does have more screen time for musical performance

2 hours ago, kittyna said:

One such example below - by the way, I just want to say that there is a marked difference between Nodame and Nae Il's piano-playing styles here.

After re-watching  whole  Nodame  cantabile series(2006) for the above scene:bawling:, because I was baffled that I could I had missed such an iconic scene. Then I have finally  realized that it was from the Movie version of "Nodame Cantabile The Movie : Final Score 2" :joy:

3 hours ago, kittyna said:

So now your comment makes me wonder: does the Japanese version not show as much of the behind-the-scenes stuff that goes into studying and performing music compared to the Korean version? Like, is that where the difference in screen time is?

No, there were no behind-the-scenes about struggle of musical students(I am talking about 2006 version series), it was totally about realizing potential of two main leads. But there were some scene where they show few struggles, it was limited only to the group, like finding harmony in the orchestra group for better performance, other than that there was no issue like hierarchy, school administration interference etc etc. Maybe that's where Korean version fell short, people were expecting it to have more about musical performance, which it did have on par with Japanese version, but lack of research made the series mediocre:dissapointed:

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1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

By the way Nodame cantabile has 2 movies and 2 drama series:astonished:,no wonder people find Korean version inferior to Japanese version, maybe that's the reason why people find it had more musical angle. And also, if we add the movies and series of the Nodame cantabile it does have more screen time for musical performance

 

Ah - well, if you put it together like that, I'd have to compare Nodame Cantabile with a combination of Nae Il's Cantabile and any fan-made sequel that comes along with it ;) That's a massive difference in terms of just how much story/footage is there to begin with.

 

lol - Just kidding. I know there's just the one official K-drama, and we'll just leave it at that :P 

 

1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

I do agree that there was lack of research when it comes to Korean version, I did find the musical postures of characters a bit bland , but Japanese version it was more expression and felt lively while watching it. But I think over dramatization made series of Japanese version more musical in nature.

 

I did find some of the performances in the Japanese version to be over-dramatized for my taste. But that's just for my taste: even professional musicians vary a lot in terms of how much they move (or don't) while performing. I'm just someone who prefers there to be less movement or showmanship, but there's nothing inherently wrong with it. 

 

The most accurate performance for me, though, is still Secret Love Affair, since the actors were taught to actually play the excerpts you hear on screen. The director there was aiming for "100% synchronicity" - i.e. that every single note you see is what you hear, and vice-versa. And considering that we're talking about virtuosic pieces, and lead actors like Yoo Ah In and Kim Hee Ae who were not professional pianists to begin with...I have to give serious kudos to the entire production team for pulling it off.

 

And, by extension, cut Nae Il's Cantabile some slack for not having 100% synchronicity - because that was never the director's vision to begin with, as evidenced by some of the editing (where footage is slowed down while the audio still continues at tempo, for example).

 

1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

No, there were no behind-the-scenes about struggle of musical students(I am talking about 2006 version series), it was totally about realizing potential of two main leads. But there were some scene where they show few struggles, it was limited only to the group, like finding harmony in the orchestra group for better performance, other than that there was no issue like hierarchy, school administration interference etc etc. Maybe that's where Korean version fell short, people were expecting it to have more about musical performance, which it did have on par with Japanese version, but lack of research made the series mediocre:dissapointed:

 

I wonder if that difference reflects a difference between Japanese and Korean culture more generally: a lot of the "A vs. S" stuff in Nae Il's Cantabile seems to be common in Korean dramas, but I have a hard time imagining the conflict taken to the extent that it is in any other cultural context. Like, I'm aware that Japan is also uber-competitive like Korea is, but the whole push to uplift yourself by pushing others down (like what many of the A students end up doing, with the tacit approval of the board) seems to contradict Japan's more group-oriented image. I could be wrong, though; I'm just guessing.

 

And maybe it's because I'm biased, but I want to know: what do you think were the biggest strengths and weaknesses in the Korean version compared to the Japanese?

 

[EDIT]

 

And now I'm wondering if the situation might ever come up for Cha Yoo Jin to hit someone over the head with an empty cardboard box :P Because, well, you know, he totally would ;) 

 

(Just stumbled across this scene from the Japanese, and cracked up)

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, kittyna said:

And maybe it's because I'm biased, but I want to know: what do you think were the biggest strengths and weaknesses in the Korean version compared to the Japanese?

Direction, editing, weak story writing and usual second lead cliché. But still, it made good impression with Nodame cantabile fan circle

 

24 minutes ago, kittyna said:

 

20 minutes ago, kittyna said:

lol - Just kidding. I know there's just the one official K-drama, and we'll just leave it at that :P 

Thank god

28 minutes ago, kittyna said:

 

And, by extension, cut Nae Il's Cantabile some slack for not having 100% synchronicity - because that was never the director's vision to begin with, as evidenced by some of the editing (where footage is slowed down while the audio still continues at tempo, for example).

I too have read in an article , where directed wanted to do something different, but I guess in the end they could not just get new story line and in turn it might have affected the research like how to depict the conductor performance and pianist shoulder movement (that seems to be major issue with Nodame cantabile's fans ), the acting depict was in identical that of Japanese version, especially nae-il's performance was wonderful

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1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

Direction, editing, weak story writing and usual second lead cliché. But still, it made good impression with Nodame cantabile fan circle

 

O_O - Oh, wow...well, here's hoping that Seolleim in Salzburg has met your expectations so far, then. It started off as just a continuation, but I think that, by this point, it's also become my attempt to flesh out the characters and make them three-dimensional.

 

1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

I too have read in an article , where directed wanted to do something different, but I guess in the end they could not just get new story line and in turn it might have affected the research like how to depict the conductor performance and pianist shoulder movement (that seems to be major issue with Nodame cantabile's fans )

 

Shoulder movement, posture, etc. are - as you've pointed out - the subtle clues as to whether someone is actually playing the piano or pretending to. The full-body movement is something that I, too, thought was lacking in the piano performances in Nae Il's Cantabile: there were moments where the actors were trying to play a certain phrase or scale and the arm movement was...like, way too light or floating for it to be a realistic match to the audio. Like, even light-sounding music needs to have some oomph or force behind it, and that was missing in a number of instances. The biggest offender for that was the first Mozart duet, but I do think that subsequent attempts were better, with JW edging out Shim Eun Kyung just a tad (again, with the caveat that neither of them were classical pianists, so even as a lifelong amateur pianist myself, I didn't go into the drama expecting anything).

 

As for conducting, it's really idiosyncratic/individualized to begin with, so the actors would have actually had a lot of room to work with. Both JW and Park Bo Gum had some really good moments here in terms of movements that looked natural and in-line with the music; the moments that did appear out of sync seem to have been due to editing rather than their acting. My personal favourite conducting shot, though, has to go to PBG rather than JW: it's the opening to La Forza del Destino in Episode 16, with those three accented notes and the clean cut-off - I thought PBG absolutely nailed that there.

 

It's the other conducting student (i.e. the A Orchestra's conductor) who was lacking here, with his unrealistically over-dramatic-to-the-point-of-meaning-nothing movements, but I actually think the director was deliberately aiming for that and guided the actor accordingly. ;) So you can see that in the scene where Cha Yoo Jin imagines himself conducting the A Orchestra (which is also the shot that made it into all the ads and trailers), that's how JW is moving - but that's very different from Yoo Jin's actual style.

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6 hours ago, kittyna said:

O_O - Oh, wow...well, here's hoping that Seolleim in Salzburg has met your expectations so far, then. It started off as just a continuation, but I think that, by this point, it's also become my attempt to flesh out the characters and make them three-dimensional.

Yeah, it did. It almost felt like sequel of the series. In the series I did not get to see the arc of cha yoo jin and nae-il, as we can see it came just before the end. So, it was refreshing to read about their life in Europe. :)

6 hours ago, kittyna said:

The full-body movement is something that I, too, thought was lacking in the piano performances in Nae Il's Cantabile: there were moments where the actors were trying to play a certain phrase or scale and the arm movement was...like, way too light or floating for it to be a realistic match to the audio

Nae-il's character was lacking in this part especially(playing piano), her acting was excellent,  almost overshadowed Joo won's. Joo won's acting was a bit off, but his actions like conductor and as a pianist were on par with Japanese version. So, I think if they had corrected these flaws with good writing, the series would have got decent ratings:smile:

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8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Yeah, it did. It almost felt like sequel of the series. In the series I did not get to see the arc of cha yoo jin and nae-il, as we can see it came just before the end. So, it was refreshing to read about their life in Europe. :)

 

Well, that's a relief :) Even if I write mostly for my own enjoyment and according to my own imagination, I obviously still hope that you guys enjoy the results. :) 

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Nae-il's character was lacking in this part especially(playing piano), her acting was excellent,  almost overshadowed Joo won's. Joo won's acting was a bit off, but his actions like conductor and as a pianist were on par with Japanese version.

 

I haven't re-watched all the footage, but JW did have one pretty epicly bad moment in his piano acting during the Mozart duet. It's at this one point just before the end of the piece when, after a few flashback shots from his childhood, we see Cha Yoo Jin watching Nae Il and smiling at her. And I don't really know what happened there, but JW's hands and wrists were really floppy - like, so much so that it's obvious that he's not even playing at all :P It's just for a moment, because after the next cut, the remaining shots for the final chords were better, so I'd be really curious as to just what went on there behind the scenes. It was almost like, that early in the filming, JW could either play the piano as Cha Yoo Jin or act as Cha Yoo Jin, but couldn't quite juggle both yet.

 

But while some musicians might be upset seeing stuff like that...I just burst out laughing :lol: It just turned into an unintentionally funny moment for me.

 

JW's fake-playing was a lot more solid during the Grieg concerto, though. I like that he was able to vary his renditions of the same passage to show when he was getting into it emotionally (i.e. during rehearsals with Professor Do, his solo practice session, and the final product) or when he was just playing without expression (i.e. during rehearsals with Professor Stresemann).

 

As for his conducting, there is one thing that I could point out, but it's not so much a flaw as it is a sign of a beginner. JW has a tendency to mirror when he's conducting: i.e., his right and left hands were doing the same thing. While that can be effective if the conductor really wants to draw emphasis to something (e.g. a unison accented note, like the beginning of Eroica), JW does that almost constantly through the Rachmaninoff concerto and a good chunk of the Tchaikovsky one as well. Again, it's not wrong, but considering just how much of a role the conductor has in shaping the musicians' expression and interpretation of music, mirroring is a waste of that potential. There is one instance JW actually got it wrong, though: when, while mirroring during the Rachmaninoff, his hands accidentally crossed in front of his chest - the left and right sides of his body should be clearly separate.

 

In terms of his acting, I think JW gave it his best shot - but he was given a pretty 2-dimensional character to work with and that's not really in line with his strengths.

 

Moving on to other things: JW recently filmed a video greeting for his former high school's film festival.

 

 

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2 hours ago, kittyna said:

I haven't re-watched all the footage, but JW did have one pretty epicly bad moment in his piano acting during the Mozart duet. It's at this one point just before the end of the piece when, after a few flashback shots from his childhood, we see Cha Yoo Jin watching Nae Il and smiling at her. And I don't really know what happened there, but JW's hands and wrists were really floppy - like, so much so that it's obvious that he's not even playing at all :P It's just for a moment, because after the next cut, the remaining shots for the final chords were better, so I'd be really curious as to just what went on there behind the scenes. It was almost like, that early in the filming, JW could either play the piano as Cha Yoo Jin or act as Cha Yoo Jin, but couldn't quite juggle both yet.

 

But while some musicians might be upset seeing stuff like that...I just burst out laughing :lol: It just turned into an unintentionally funny moment for me.

 

JW's fake-playing was a lot more solid during the Grieg concerto, though. I like that he was able to vary his renditions of the same passage to show when he was getting into it emotionally (i.e. during rehearsals with Professor Do, his solo practice session, and the final product) or when he was just playing without expression (i.e. during rehearsals with Professor Stresemann).

 

As for his conducting, there is one thing that I could point out, but it's not so much a flaw as it is a sign of a beginner. JW has a tendency to mirror when he's conducting: i.e., his right and left hands were doing the same thing. While that can be effective if the conductor really wants to draw emphasis to something (e.g. a unison accented note, like the beginning of Eroica), JW does that almost constantly through the Rachmaninoff concerto and a good chunk of the Tchaikovsky one as well. Again, it's not wrong, but considering just how much of a role the conductor has in shaping the musicians' expression and interpretation of music, mirroring is a waste of that potential. There is one instance JW actually got it wrong, though: when, while mirroring during the Rachmaninoff, his hands accidentally crossed in front of his chest - the left and right sides of his body should be clearly separate.

 

In terms of his acting, I think JW gave it his best shot - but he was given a pretty 2-dimensional character to work with and that's not really in line with his strengths.

To be honest,  my my musical knowledge is kind of limited, if not it is at basic level, like couldn't tell the difference between violin and viola:P. You should take my review about Naeil's cantabile with a pinch of salt, most of review is based on heuristic, like I have read some comments, reviews and then I fused it my layman understanding of this series. I did loved the series before reading professional comments and reviews about the way leads have depicted the playing of musical instruments. I knew something was kind of off about the series, but not regarding the acting of the leads, but it mostly about the way series was edited and advancement of the plot. I had no complaints about the way Joo won did his conducting or the way he played the piano(including Shim Eun-Kyung). For me series was heart warming and enjoyable to watch, but I was disappointed by the ending, like there should have had a better ending, like the friends were sending off Yoo jin and Naeil to Europe or at least they should have made 2 seasons with 8 episodes each, one in Korea and second season in Europe, then I think it would have justified the remark. Nevertheless, it was decent one, not as bad as "My Sassy Girl", that series was way too confusing :joy:

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1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

To be hones,  my my musical knowledge is kind of limited, if not it is at basic level, like couldn't tell the difference between violin and viola:P. You should take my review about Naeil's cantabile with a pinch of salt, most of review is based on heuristic, like I have read some comments, reviews and then I fused it my layman understanding of this series. I did loved the series before reading professional comments and reviews about the way leads have depicted the playing of musical instruments.

 

Same here - most of what I know about playing piano comes from personal experience, but I've only ever played just at home, for myself. I did have tests/examinations before, but not competitions (my teacher was one of the rare few who disliked them), so my knowledge of how things would work in a music program at university is patchy. The one thing I could really bring to the table, to be honest, is that the style or general school of playing that I learned is more in line with Yoo Jin's than Nae Il's: i.e., creative interpretation is allowed, but only within the confines of the score; playing classical music is about learning self-discipline; etc.

 

In contrast, my knowledge of how to play string instruments is virtually non-existent - which is why I don't comment on, say, Go Kyung Pyo's musical performance as Yoo Il Rak or Park Bo Gum's cello. In those cases - and, actually, in evaluating the conducting performances - I can only go by what I've observed watching filmed concerts and whatnot.

 

But again, all things considered, all I ask for is that what I see is somewhat related to what I hear: actual technique doesn't matter so much to me as the narrative potential (i.e. even if the actor gets things wrong, all that matters to me is that the character played that piece).

 

1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

I knew something was kind of off about the series, but not regarding the acting of the leads, but it mostly about the way series was edited and advancement of the plot. I had no complaints about the way Joo won did his conducting or the way he played the piano(including Shim Eun-Kyung). For me series was heart warming and enjoyable to watch, but I was disappointed by the ending, like there should have had a better ending, like the friends were sending off Yoo jin and Naeil to Europe or at least they should have made 2 seasons with 8 episodes each, one in Korea and second season in Europe, then I think it would have justified the remark.

 

Regardless, I still think Nae Il's Cantabile is a heartwarming drama. I really liked each character's individual growth, and that's honestly what mattered most to me as a viewer :) 

 

And, well, it should be pretty obvious to everyone by now that I, too, would have liked to see the story expanded into their lives in Europe :P I mean, I've got how many fics in that series now???

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2 hours ago, kittyna said:

I learned is more in line with Yoo Jin's than Nae Il's: i.e., creative interpretation is allowed, but only within the confines of the score; playing classical music is about learning self-discipline; etc.

Did Naeil interpreted her own music from scores in the series?! I though she played her own music, like not from the score, like music just comes to her mind and she plays them randomly, so, I thought that's she lost the competition :o

 

2 hours ago, kittyna said:

I've got how many fics in that series now???

14:P(I know its a rhetorical question)

 

2 hours ago, kittyna said:

Same here - most of what I know about playing piano comes from personal experience, but I've only ever played just at home, for myself. I did have tests/examinations before, but not competitions (my teacher was one of the rare few who disliked them), so my knowledge of how things would work in a music program at university is patchy. The one thing I could really bring to the table, to be honest, is that the style or general school of playing that I learned is more in line with Yoo Jin's than Nae Il's: i.e., creative interpretation is allowed, but only within the confines of the score; playing classical music is about learning self-discipline; etc.

Prior to Naeil's cantabile series, I thought music is only about learning how play an instrument and memorizing the tunes and scores. I never knew it is almost like becoming an engineer or doctor. I would like to ask you, what do you mean by competition? Is it like practicals? Or, like playing in the presence of audience? Or, like competing with your peers?

 

2 hours ago, kittyna said:

Go Kyung Pyo's musical performance as Yoo Il Rak

His character was way funnier than Japanese version, I think it is because of more screen time:joy:

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2 hours ago, kittyna said:

but I've only ever played just at home, for myself.

Every time when someone says he/she plays piano, Naeil's image pops in my mind and just start smiling like an idiot :joy:, I know in the series she was prodigy in playing piano, but her careless attitude kind of overshadows that and makes her performance funny, at least in competition she was serious ^_^

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8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I never knew it is almost like becoming an engineer or doctor. I would like to ask you, what do you mean by competition? Is it like practicals? Or, like playing in the presence of audience? Or, like competing with your peers?

 

I did have practical tests/exams, where it's just me, the judge (or judges at the higher levels), and the piano. But competitions are different. I think that what you see in of Nae Il's competition in the drama should be pretty close to how they work in real life: so, yes, competing against fellow students for a prize.

 

Winning competitions - especially prestigious international ones - is a quick way for young up-and-coming classical musicians to gain recognition, and that recognition can open up a ton of opportunities (e.g. easier access to major musical institutions for further education, news media coverage, social media recognition in more recent years, etc.). Is it absolutely necessary to win a competition in order to succeed? Not necessarily. But the perks of winning are why so many people try for them. It's like Professor Do says in the drama: "Every title is power."

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Did Naeil interpreted her own music from scores in the series?! I though she played her own music, like not from the score, like music just comes to her mind and she plays them randomly, so, I thought that's she lost the competition :o

 

 

Nae Il is an auditory learner, so she plays music according to what she hears (and what sounds good to her) rather than what's written on the score. She still plays the notes that are written there, but she tends to come up with her own personal interpretation if a pre-existing version isn't fed to her first - or, as in the case with the competition in the drama, if she lets her own emotions take over. And while that level of creative interpretation is fine as a concert performer, it doesn't work with practical tests or competitions, where students are expected to meet a specific set of standards. If the point is to rank them based on their technical skills, they need to all be doing the same thing in order for there to be any chance for fair comparison.

 

As for the music that comes to Nae Il randomly that she just plays - things like what she plays after Yoo Jin tidies her apartment, or the "Fart Song" - those are improvisations and original compositions. ;) She's the composer, so she can do whatever she wants, and her version will automatically be the "right" one.

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

His character was way funnier than Japanese version, I think it is because of more screen time:joy:

 

Oh, Go Kyung Pyo's acting as Yoo Il Rak was undeniably awesome :D I meant that I couldn't evaluate his fake violin playing ;) 

 

And speaking of Nae Il's Cantabile, here's Preview 2 of the upcoming Seolleim in Salzburg fic:

 

Spoiler

The metal gate that squeaks and squeals during the off-season now glides open easily, its hinges freshly oiled in preparation for an influx of summer tourists. But the skies are cloudy today, the air hot and heavy with impending rain; St. Sebastian’s Cemetery is quiet and still, and I am the only person there as I step into the open courtyard.

 

Had Mozart himself been buried here, then this place would be packed even with the foul weather. But it’s just his family, and in comparison with him, they’ve all but faded away by the wayside.

 

The small family plot is just as I remember it: a cluster of markers huddled together in a prominent spot just inside of the entrance. Ignoring the larger stone dedicated to Mozart’s wife, I head straight for the one for his father, Leopold. I step up in front of the grave as close as I dare; then, setting down my bag, I sink down to my knees on the grass.

 

Nae Il had her recital a few days ago – and now, it’s my turn.

 

I’m not religious by any means, yet my hand moves of its own accord to mark the sign of the cross before drifting down to my lap. Somehow, in the silence of the graveyard – the only sounds being the chirping of birds in the trees and the distant whir of traffic drifting in from outside – the show of reverence simply feels right.

 

Ever since that first time early last year, whenever possible, I have come here to St. Sebastian’s before every single concert I’ve taken part in here in Salzburg. It’s my last moment to myself between the final rehearsal and the actual performance: the moment where, with no-one else to watch or listen, I confide to Mozart’s father the things I would much rather say to mine.

 

In the past, my prayer at this vigil has been the same: that somehow, by some twist of fate, Abeoji could see me up on stage and know what I, at long last, have become. Well, I don’t have to ask that today. Today, he’s already here, somewhere in this city, hopefully awaiting tonight’s performance with as much anticipation as I am.

 

Instead, today, my request to Leopold Mozart is for something else. Someone else.

 

The small velvet-covered box fits easily in the palm of my hand as I pull it out of the pocket in my trousers. With the overcast skies, the jeweled edelweiss on the ring is uncharacteristically dull; yet even then, what little light is available catches on it, smiling up at me so sweetly that I have no choice but to smile back.

 

I hear the sound of footsteps. Startled, I slam the ring box shut and shove it back into my pocket, swiveling around to see who’s come to join me.

 

“Eomma!”

 

She comes to a stop several paces away, looking down at me with a beatific smile. “I thought I’d find you here.”

 

Surprised as I am to see her, it takes me a moment before I scoot over to one side to let her sit down beside me. “How – how did you…?”

 

She couldn’t have found out from Nae Il. After all, Nae Il is aware that I like to be left entirely alone while I’m here.

 

Eomma shoots me a knowing look. “Since you couldn’t speak to the man himself, it figures that you’d find an alternative.”

 

The sky doesn’t change, yet it feels darker all the same. “Eomma….”

 

“But enough about that,” she answers, shrugging dismissively as she rallies herself together. “At least he’s actually here this time – that’s what you wanted, isn’t it?”

 

“Mm.”

 

We stay together in silence for a long moment, but then Eomma gestures at the hand in my lap. “What were you looking at just now?”

 

I round on her, blinking in surprise. “N-nothing.”

 

“It certainly didn’t look like ‘nothing,’” she retorts, a knowing smirk growing on her face. “Come on, Yoo Jin-ah: I saw that smile.”

 

I shake my head.

 

“Wae? Don’t you trust me?”

 

Not with any surprise plans, I don’t. And considering that she already knows that about me, I’m surprised she’s even asking me at all.

 

Sure enough, after yet another moment’s staring wordlessly at each other, she concedes. “Alright, then,” she says as she stands up, “you keep your secrets. If it’s something I’m allowed to know, I’m sure you’ll let me in on it in due time.”

 

After I, too, have scrambled to my feet, Eomma gives me yet another indulgent smile, clasping one hand onto my shoulder.

 

“Gwenchana, Yoo Jin-ah,” she says, giving me a firm, reassuring squeeze. “Everything will be alright.”

 

There is a strange faraway look in her eyes, as though she’s not only thinking about tonight’s concert, but some point beyond as well. But before I could ask her or try to figure out more, she turns around and heads back for the gate, calling out an invitation for me to join her indoors for a coffee before the rain starts.

 

“Ne, Eomma!”

 

I linger in the cemetery until she has disappeared through the gate and around the corner. Then, turning back to Leopold Mozart’s grave one last time, I touch a hand to the dark cool weather-beaten stone.

 

In Nae Il’s eyes, I know I’m the Robert Schumann to her Clara, and it is in that capacity that I’ll propose tonight.

 

But until then, while I’m up on that stage, let me be my father’s beloved Wolfgang instead.

 

And, moving on to other things, we've got JW's coffee order on Instagram.

 

 

Which leads me to another quick-fire interactive question: What would you imagine to be a typical coffee drink for any (or all) of JW's drama characters? Americano? Instant? Maybe someone's more a tea person instead? Anything goes - so feel free to share.

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1 hour ago, kittyna said:

What would you imagine to be a typical coffee drink for any (or all) of JW's drama characters? Americano? Instant? Maybe someone's more a tea person instead? Anything goes - so feel free to share.

Well, Joo won himself in many occasions made clear that he likes to drink coffee, like it is literally his hobby:P. So, I think his characters would also rely on coffee to cope with their work. But except for Ma jun, I think rest of joo won's characters are coffee type. Since Ma jun is a chaebol(like from rich family), and if we look at the dramas, people from rich families always prefer to have tea than coffee.

Coming to rest of his characters, I think Park Si-on and Kim Tae-Hyun would prefer instant coffee because it is readily available and they have to go to work in short notice, so , I guess they would rely on instant coffee to cope with their work.

Hwang Tae-Hee doesn't like anything sweet, so, I guess he would prefer black coffee with no sugar, to give Baek Ja-Eun company, who also likes to drink caramel Macchiato

And as per my limited knowledge coffee did not entered Korea until 19th century, so, we can rule out Gyun Woo and Lee Kang-To^_^

Ha Gil-Ro and Cha Yoo Jin have different professions, but those professions demand to stay up late at night in some cases, like Gil-Ro is a spy and Yoo-Jin always wants to improve his musical skills, so, he ends up practicing all night. I see these two choosing from wide range of options of coffee types, but if I had to narrow the options, I think Gil-Ro will try Dalgona, since it is trending and I see him more like keeping up with the trends. And Cha Yoo-Jin will go for Espresso or Cappuccino :D

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