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The K-drama Hanbok (한복) Collection (A helpful guide to the Hanbok fans with Introduction)


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Welcome to the world of a die-hard Hanbok fan!
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The very first historical drama I have watched was The Emperor of the Sea on Philippine channel 11. Lady Jung Hwa, played by the Korean actress Park Soo Ae, wore a hanbok that was akin more to a hanfu (literally "Chinese clothing") than to a hanbok.

For a time, I loved hanfu more than the hanbok, but as time passed by, as I began to get attached to historical Korean dramas, I began to shift my view. For the first time, I learned to love the hanbok. I no longer remember when or how, but I do remember why. I saw hanbok used by the Royal family, and I loved stories about the Royalty. Hanbok plus Royalty? That's equals to sky high happiness for me!
I loved it so much that I joined Soompi just to get more loads of it. It became my addiction to search the net for the best looking and most beautiful images of hanbok. I saved a lot of pictures that I've accumulated a few hundreds.
To be honest, I followed some of the historical dramas' thread not just for the story or for the casts in it, but for the chance to see more hanbok costumes.
I actually am dreaming almost every day to be able to go to Korea, wear an exquisite hanbok and stroll around Korea's historical or traditional villages.
My love for hanbok has been the driving force in making this thread. So for all hanbok fans/addicts/lovers out there, I dedicate this thread to all of you!

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HANBOK: The Starting point
- The history of Hanbok started from three different colonies (Kogueruh, Baekjae, and Shinla) ancient Korea.  - The trace of Hanbok was first founded on the walls of kingdom's graves.  - Back in Kogueruh period, clothes were influenced by China and Buddhism.  "It was brought into Korea when one of the princes married a princess of a colony in China." (Hanbok Kusong)  - That was the starting point of Hanbok. 
(source: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/costume/StudentProj/hanbok/02.html)
  

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  • 5 months later...

HANBOK:

WHAT is it?

 - Hanbok is a Korean traditional clothes that harmonize the straight lines with the soft curve lines.  - The short top that comes down to the top of the chest area to the ground brings out the beauty in women. - As for men, the top accentuates the vest, which is worn with pants and a jacket that brings out the style.  - In ancient time, as Korean people called themselves "the white-clad folk", most people had a preference for white Hanbok.  The common people usually wore white Hanbok and only the top class people wore colored Hanbok.  - Also the shape of the top class people's Hanbok was different from the common people.  Recently, people design their own Hanbok in their freely styles.(source: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/costume/StudentProj/hanbok/01.html)




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  • 4 months later...

To better understand the evolution of Hanbok, I'm posting the Ancient Kingdoms of Korea. Here it is:
TheKoreanKingdoms_zps31c501d3.png?t=1393

Points to remember:

1. Even though Goguryeo won against massive Chinese invasion, at the end, they were unable to win against too many wars. The Goguryeo fell weak and defeated, and they were conquered by allied Silla-Tang forcess in 668.
2. This Chinese invasion greatly paved the way for the Chinese culture to influence Korea, which was evident by a lot of things: education, politics, lifestyle and of course, clothing.
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Hanbok Materials

1. In the old days, the hanbok differed according to the wearer's class, gender, profession, social status and season. Mena nd women of the high class society always wear brightly colored hanbok, whereas the lower class wear earth color ones.

sungkyunkwan-scandal-ep-10-avi_002537404
From: Sungkyungkwan Scandal (Hyo-Eun wearing bright colored hanbok befitting her status as daughter of the War Minister)


2. The poor population used hemp during the summer, and cotton during the winter season. While the "yangban" or land owners and the members of the highest social status used ramie during the summer and silk and satin during the winter.
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- The colors used to make the 저고리/jeogori and 치마/chima depended on the wearer’s social status.  Royalty, court officials, and the upper class wore bright colored hanboks, while commoners wore light earth colored hanboks such as white, pale pink, light green, and charcoal.

Additional info:

- The colors of the jeogori were used back then to identify the ladies’s status: those who wore the yellow jeogori were singles and those with green jeogori were counting days until their marriage or they were recently married. It’s more of a customary practice and until today, the bride will wear a green jeogori when they pay the first visit to her husband’s parents.

:)
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The traditional Korean hairstyle
- For all of the hairstyles, you would notice that the word Meori being used a lot. Meori means "head", "hair on the head" (as opposed to hair on any other body parts), or "hairdo".

1. For the unmarried maidens, it's the simple but elegant "bae'ssi deang'gi meori." 
- With daeng'gi meori, long hair is braided into a single long braid, and accented with a bright colored- ribbon (called daeng'gi) at the end.- Only unmarried women wore daeng'gi meori. Notable thing is that in traditional Korea, unmarried man also wore daeng'gi meori, only with a different colored daeng'gi. This was because Confucianism requires that you cannot cut your hair, as it is a part of your body given from your parents.

2009012461002_0.jpg


SdOFuGb.jpgFrom: The Moon that embraces the Sun (Kim Yoo Jung as young Yeon Woo, with the bae'ssi deang'gi meori hairtyle as shown in front)
BsebyxS.jpg
From: The Princess' Man (Moon Chae Won as Princess Seryung, with the bae'ssi deang'gi meori hairtyle as shown from the back. Her hair was longer in this version of the hairstyle.)




2. Now this is a woman's traditional wedding hairdo, with added pin ornaments:
2009012461002_1.jpg

3. Another hairstyle popular for the married women is the "Eon'jeun Meori". 
- Also a popular option among married women in traditional Korea. Instead of the bun being on the back of the neck, it "rested" (eon'jeun) on the top of the head.
- Notable thing about this hairdo -- and probably the reason why it did not survive as long as other hairdos did -- is that often, women used wigs to make their hair much more fuller. As you can imagine, they were heavy and very expensive. (Obviously, it takes human hair to make the wigs, and most people refused to cut their hair.) Because of that, there was a royal order in the mid-Joseon era prohibiting the use of wigs as they were deemed to be promoting wasteful spending as well as neck injury. Even today, the wigs are a significant enough burden for actresses who star in historical dramas such that some directors elect not to use the wigs although the drama might become historically inaccurate.

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Now for Royal women members:
1. Eo'yeo Meori (어여머리)
- This hair is made almost exclusively with wigs. These are worn by queens, other kings' wives and queen mothers. Additional decoration (called tteoljam 떨잠) were added to create a more luxurious look.

700d7fec926ebcdc895e6bcd71c651c1.jpg



2. Keun Meori

- The mother of all traditional Korean hairdos.- On top of the eo'yeo meori, a gigantic addition called tteoguji (떠구지) is affixed for emphasis.- Originally the addition used to be made with actual human hair, but after the prohibition on wigs, it was made with wood carved and painted in black in order to make it resemble human hair. Apparently the wooden addition was actually lighter than the addition made with human hair.

3052191a5a7b3d1f6b978f8995ae4dee.jpgFrom: Dong Yi



3. Daesu meori (대수머리)

- With the heavy daesu as the main headgear for the hairstyle, it was reserved for the royal consorts, especially the queens and crown princesses for special ceremonies such as wedding. The hairstyle was worn with the lavish jeokui.

8zKoeWJ.jpg
From: Cruel Palace



For palace servants, we have:
1. Saeng meori (생머리)
- A hairstyle for the younger court ladies such as saenggaksi (young court ladies around 9-14 years old) and nain (slightly older court ladies before they were raised to the rank of sanggung). - The hair was parted into several parts and it was braided and folded.- The number of parts depended on the departments in which the court ladies worked: jimil nain had four parts while chimbang and sukbang nain had their hair divided into two parts.- The daenggi for this hairstyle depended on the number of parts too: negadak daenggi for the four-part (네 – ne = four, 가닥 – gadak = the part of hair) and dugadak daenggi for two-part ( 두 – du = two) saeng meori.

jang-ok-jung-e08-avi_001850250.jpg?w=374From: jang Ok Jung, living in love (Kim Tae Hee as Ok Jung, sporting the hairstyle when she was just a servant-in-training.)




For the commoners (and very poor people):

1. Ko meori (코머리)
- Reserved for the married lower class women, it used the original hair of the women braided into two pigtails and pulled onto the top of the hair. A daenggi, most of the time red, was fastened on the braided hair.

tree-with-deep-roots-ep-10-avi_001186886




We also have hairstyles that doesn't come with wigs:
1. Jjok/Jjokjin meori (쪽/쪽진머리)
- After wigs were banned from public usage during Yeongjo’s reign, this hairstyle was used widely among the commoners who were married as well as the noble women and the royal women. Binyeo was the most common ornament to be used with this style.

yE1agRk.jpg pOBKiYJ.jpg


Now for another class, the Gisaeng
- While traditional Korean dresses are represented by the words "elegant" and "refined," the clothes worn by female entertainers of the Chosun Dynasty exude splendor and voluptuousness.- Accentuating them, the hairdo known as "tre meori" features a braided coil. This style is often found in the genre paintings of the era.

2009012461002_3.jpg


(sources: http://askakorean.blogspot.com/2010/03/traditional-korean-hairdo-for-women.html and http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2009/01/24/2009012461002.html)


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Hwarot

59715a71460928e1542f3c375d6379d2.jpg
class="commentDescriptionContent" style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(23, 23, 23); font-weight: normal; line-height: 20px; max-width: 600px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"Left : Illustrated by South Korean 'Kwon, Oh Chang (권오창)' Right : Illustrated by North Korean 'Lee, Pal Chan (리팔찬)'
  • a type of traditional Korean clothing worn during the Goryeo and Joseon Dynasty by royal women for ceremonial occasions or by commoners for weddings. It originated from the Kingdom of Khotan, Central Asia.
  • a type of bridal topcoat usually reserved for royal women and princesses. Not only was it worn with 화관/hwagwan, but also 앞댕기/ap-daenggi (a type of daenggi that is paired and worn in the front), 도투락댕기/doturak-daenggi (a wider silk daenggi that is hung from the crown in the back),용잠/yongjam (a long hairpin/rod that has a dragon’s head at the end), and 대대/daedae (red colored silk sash with gold pattern worn around the waist and tied to the back of the 활옷/hwarot.
  • adorned with 10 symbols of noble plants and animals denoting luck, long-life and prosperity.
  • Luxuriously embroidered using crimson thread, one can imagine how expensive a hwalot is. Common people, who cannot afford this clothing, resorted to wearing nok wonsam instead.

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001_by_glimja-d6wccsw.jpg

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Wonsam

4db39e557791c9f9f69b29af36fee24f.jpg
class="commentDescriptionContent" style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(23, 23, 23); font-weight: normal; line-height: 20px; max-width: 600px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"Left : Illustrated by South Korean 'Kwon, Oh Chang (권오창)' Right : Illustrated by North Korean 'Lee, Pal Chan (리팔찬)'
  • 원삼/Wonsam is another type of bridal topcoat made by silk worn by royalty, noble women, and high ranking court ladies. during ceremonies. Commoners were allowed to wear 원삼/Wonsam. The color of the 원삼/Wonsam, however, depicted the wearer’s rank. For example, the color gold/yellow was worn by empresses, red by queens, magenta by princess consorts and concubines, and green by princesses and the wives of 양반/yangban. Commoners also wore green, but they were only allowed to wear green for their wedding ceremonies.
  • Varieties of silk were used as the fabric. Wonsam for winter were made with dan (緞), a thick silk with a glossy surface formed with a satin weave, and wonsam for summer were made with sa (紗), a loosely woven silk.
  • was based on an overcoat with broad sleeves of theChinese Tang Dynasty. The Chinese clothing system was introduced to Korea when King Munmu, the 30th king of the Silla Kingdom, reformed women’s clothing in 664 AD. As an adaptation from the original model, the wonsam gradually evolved into a distinctive form characteristic of traditional Korean clothing.
  • Today the wonsam is worn primarily in representations of Joseon royal ceremonies and as a wedding garment, and in a much simplified version when performing traditional Korean dances.
  • Nok Wonsam - "green" wonsam
  • Hwang Wonsam - "yellow" wonsam
  • Hong Wonsam - "red" wonsam
  • Today the wonsam is worn primarily in representations of Joseon royal ceremonies and as a wedding garment, and in a much simplified version when performing traditional Korean dances.


A couple of green wonsam:
800px-Korea-Hanbok-Queen-01.jpg

cab198e5d7611d325a953adc9d7ea339.jpg



Other images:

vlcsnap-2013-05-22-20h52m34s115_zps3c0db

46ce32f5d2eb997ce9c8bf045f7cfd97.jpg

001_by_glimja-d6w1069.jpg

00002_by_glimja-d6tcv16.jpg

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Guest ravendark

I searched for a long time about Chinese/ Japanese and Korean Traditional clothing and accessories to gather info about them. Aslo pattern cutting, dyeing and sewing methods. Still keep piling every bit of info I find. I love the lines and elegancy of them. My Main goal is designing a collection with traditional inspiration hope to complete one day:) so your posts are very usefull for me :) thank you for sharing. 

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ravendark said: I searched for a long time about Chinese/ Japanese and Korean Traditional clothing and accessories to gather info about them. Aslo pattern cutting, dyeing and sewing methods. Still keep piling every bit of info I find. I love the lines and elegancy of them. My Main goal is designing a collection with traditional inspiration hope to complete one day:) so your posts are very usefull for me :) thank you for sharing. 
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Jeokui

ed18e1a37989906887b078e89cff3d36.jpg
class="commentDescriptionContent" style="margin: 0px; font-weight: normal; line-height: 20px; max-width: 600px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"Left : Illustrated by South Korean 'Kwon, Oh Chang (권오창)' Right : Illustrated by North Korean 'Lee, Pal Chan (리팔찬)'

  • Jeokui is a blue ceremonial robe with red fabrics lined the collar until the lower hem and also the hem of the sleeves. Patterns of clouds and phoenixes are embroidered on the red linings while clouds and dragons on the blue parts. Most of the time, the princess or the queen will be holding a slab of white or greenish blue jade (depending on what their spouses are using) known as paeokor gyu. (see image below)
    Originated from the Koryo Dynasty (918-1392). The design is based on a present from China's Empress Hoyja (Ming Dynasty).
    8fc2e66db0325f0b7981ce14bc2493b5.jpg

    2_3_by_glimja-d6utyvs.jpg

    • Chijeokui is a variety of jeokui. It’s a red ceremonial robe with circles down the hem of both sleeves and at the lower part of the back flap. (see image below)
3_1_by_glimja-d6uxbi1.jpg

royal_by_anantax3-d6thlnn.jpg




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