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January 2, 2015
History Weepie Strikes Chord with Korean Americans
Source: The Chosun Ilbo
The enthusiasm for a melodrama about a man's sacrifices during modern Korean history is winging its way across the pond to the U.S. 
Distributor CJ Entertainment on Wednesday said "Ode to My Father" drew over 6,000 viewers just four days into its Christmas-Day release at the CGV in Los Angeles, which is home to a large Korean community. 
Tickets sold out during the weekend, and over 90 percent were sold on weekdays except for the first showing in the morning.
Many moviegoers were people in their 50s and over who are the first-generation immigrants, the company said. 
The movie portrays a man's life through historical events spanning more than 50 years including the Korean War in the 1950s, sending troops to the Vietnam War and coal miners and nurses to Germany in the 1960s and nationwide campaign to reunite families separated during the Korean War in the 1980s. It seems to remind older expats of their own past of struggle to survive in a foreign country.
The weepie is scheduled for a second release at a local theater in Pasadena on Friday, and will be released at 43 theaters in Boston, Chicago, New York, Seattle and Washington in the U.S. as well as Toronto and Vancouver in Canada on Jan. 9

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January 2, 2015
Film about modern Korean history tops 6 million viewer mark amid controversy
SEOUL, Jan. 2 (Yonhap) -- A domestic film depicting the life of a typical father from Korea's older generation has attracted more than 6 million viewers, its investor-distributor said Friday, amid controversy over the film's alleged right-wing ideological bias.
"Ode to My Father" exceeded the milestone on Thursday, drawing a total of 6,097,483 people to 941 theaters around the country since it opened on Dec. 17, CJ Entertainment said.
The human drama drew a record 751,253 people on Thursday alone, the largest-ever number of viewers for a single film on New Year's Day.
Industry experts say, if the current trend continues, the movie is expected to easily top 7 million this weekend.
Directed by Youn Je-kyun, who is best known for the 2009 hit film "Haeundae," "Ode to My Father" tells the story of an ordinary father named Deok-su (played by Hwang Jung-min) who sacrificed himself to support his family through the country's turbulent modern history from the 1950-53 Korean War till recently.
But the movie has sparked heated online controversy since some young critics criticized it for taking an approach of justifying extreme nationalism in appealing to the people's patriotism for money.
President Park Geun-hye fueled the debate by saying after watching the film earlier this week that "we should love the state whether we are pleasant or sad," citing a scene from the movie in which the domestic fight between Deok-su and his wife is interrupted by the sound of the national anthem.
In the 1970s, the government played the national anthem in the evenings every day to heighten nationalism. All Korean citizens were obliged to stand up and put their right hand to their chest to show respect when the national anthem was played.
AEN20150102003700315_01_i.jpg
A poster of the hit Korean film "Ode to My Father" (Yonhap) A poster of the hit Korean film "Ode to My Father" (Yonhap)

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January 2, 2015
Domestic movies dominant for four straight years
By Limb Jae-un Korea.net Staff Writer (jun2@korea.kr) KPOPHERALD

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In 2014, domestic films captured over 50 percent of the local movie market for the fourth straight year. 
According to local box office data, total movie ticket sales hit a record of 215 million last year, an increase of 0.8 percent from the 213 million tickets sold in 2013, announced the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism on December 31. 
Out of the 215 million tickets sold last year, 106.89 million of them were for Korean films, as of December 30. Domestic movies' share of the local market has now stayed at over 50 percent for the fourth straight year, although it's lower than the 59.7 percent grabbed in 2013. 
Considering that the country's population is just over 50 million, Koreans watched an average of four films per person at movie theaters in 2014. 
The Korean film "Roaring Currents" set a box office record last year, helping domestic films maintain their market share. The film, which describes a sea battle led by Admiral Yi Sun-sin in the Myeongryang Straits in the South Sea in 1597, attracted 17.6 million viewers. Most recently, another film about a father's struggle throughout the 1960s and 1970s, "Ode to My Father," brought over 6 million spectators to theaters. 
Among international films, both "Frozen" and "Interstellar" lured over 10 million viewers each. Other blockbusters, including "The Amazing Spider-Man 2" and "X-Men: Days of Future Past," were also very popular. 
What is peculiar about the local box office last year is that there were many non-mainstream movies. According to the box office data announced by the culture ministry, the number of tickets purchased for non-mainstream films, including indie movies, had been declining since 2009 when such films attracted over 10 million moviegoers. In 2014, however, these films lured 14.91 million viewers. 
Among domestic indie films, "Han Gong-ju" and "The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared" both caught a lot of attention. Among international films, "Begin Again" attracted 3.42 million viewers. 
Recently, the domestic documentary "My Love, Don't Cross That River" had over 4 million ticket sales as of January, setting a record in the indie Korean film scene. 

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December 29, 2014
JK YOUN Director of ODE TO MY FATHER"I wanted to prove that I can make well-made commercial films"
 by KIM Hyun-soo KOBIZ ZoWQGfjIERLNhmqhLtvr.jpg

JK YOUN’s Ode to My Father reached 4 million admissions in just 14 days, after its release on December 17th. It’s not a surprise for JK YOUN who is known as one of the ’10 million admissions directors’. Will he be able to record a second 10 million hit film? Although we won’t know the final number for the film just yet, Ode to My Father has a personal meaning to YOUN. He has confessed that it’s a film made for his father and has been dreaming of creating it for ten years. Ode to My Father has also been invited officially to the Berlin International Film Festival in the Panorama Section, which gave the director the honor of being invited to an international film festival for the first time. We sat down with JK YOUN to know more about Ode to My Father. How did you come to work on Ode to My Father?I had my first child in 2004. The milestone made me think of my father who had passed away. I never had a chance to say thank you, and dreamt to make a film about fatherhood for him. However, in order to express the times set in the film, we needed at least USD 10 million. At the time, I was a failed director due to weak box office performance of Crazy Assassins (2003). Who would invest in such a director? However, after the box office hit Haeundae in 2009, I was able to start working on Ode to My Father. 

HWANG Jung-min plays Deok-su from his 20s to senior years. Why did you choose HWANG for the role?I needed an actor with a wide spectrum, who would be able to cover the character from his 20s to his 70s. There are many actors who would be able to cover the 30s to later years, but I could only think of HWANG Jung-min for Deok-su in Ode to My Father. Also, I thought his personality was very close to my father and me. We’re direct, but we have good intentions.
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January 6, 2015
‘Ode to My Father’ still No. 1 despite controversy
BY JIN EUN-SOO [jes@joongang.co.kr] INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily

Despite intensifying political controversy over director Yoon Je-kyun’s latest film “Ode to My Father” in recent days, the movie won the box-office race again over the weekend, with 1,655,521 cinemagoers coming to see the film, according to state-run Korean Film Council.
For three straight weeks since it was released on Dec. 17, “Ode to My Father” held the No. 1 place with a total of 7.7 million viewers, bringing in 60.5 billion won ($54 million).
The movie, which roughly traces the difficulties Koreans faced during and after the 1950-53 Korean War with the intention of showing gratitude to our fathers and grandfathers’ generations, has been criticized for glorifying industrialization.
Film critic Huh Ji-woong commented on his Twitter account on Dec. 26 that the film “emphasizes the sacrifices of seniors while their current lackadaisical attitudes should be identified as a real problem,” adding that the movie seems “contradictory.”
Culture critic Chin Jung-kwon who is also a liberal commentator said the film amount to a “low-class tearjerker.”
However, the director told the JoongAng Ilbo in a recent interview that he only wanted to say “thank you” to the fathers who have survived through the hard times. The film is a “dedication” to our father’s generation, said Yoon, and nothing more.
“I am just shocked at the way my work is being interpreted, which is absolutely removed from my motive,” Yoon said recently.
Meanwhile, the third and last installment in the “Taken” series starring Liam Neeson debuted in second place with 641,891 viewers, making 5 billion won. The action movie follows a familiar act of revenge being carried out by Brian Mills (Neeson), a former CIA agent, going after a human trafficking organization that kidnapped his daughter - again.
DreamWorks Animation’s latest feature “Penguins of Madagascar” opened with 498,126 moviegoers, landing in third place. 
In fourth place was “My Love, Don’t Cross That River,” a documentary about an elderly couple. It has become the most-watched documentary in the history of Korean cinema by beating out “Old Partner” (2009), which brought in 2.9 million viewers. 
“My Love” collected 341,739 tickets over the weekend. It has now been seen by more than 4.3 million moviegoers. 
Local crime movie “The Con Artists” starring Kim Woo-bin and Lee Hyun-woo secured its fifth-place spot with 310,847 tickets sold, which brought its two-week total to about 2.25 million attendees.

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January 5, 2015
Most anticipated films of 2015
By Jason Bechervaise The Korea Times
Last year saw a number of new filmmakers emerge such as July Jung ("A Girl at My Door"), Lee Do-yun ("Confession") and Shim Sung-bo ("Haemoo"), but one of the striking features of 2015 is the number of established filmmakers releasing their latest features such as Ryoo Seung-wan, Na Hong-jin and Im Sang-soo.
‘Gangnam Blues' 
Among these names also includes Yoo Ha whose filmography includes the acclaimed "Marriage is a Crazy Thing" (2002). Yoo's latest "Gangnam Blues" is an eagerly awaited action-noir film that shares much in common with his well-received 2006 feature "A Dirty Carnival" owing to its gangster elements. Hitting local screens on Jan. 21, it features Hallyu star Lee Min-ho in his first leading role in a film alongside Kim Rae-won.
The pair play childhood friends who get separated when they get involved in political clashes after their shanty homes are demolished by local thugs amidst the height of political corruption when the now famous and affluent district of Gangnam was being transformed into a developed area in the 1970s.
‘Gokseong' 
Looking further ahead, Na Hong-jin who found success both home and abroad following his box office hit "The Chaser" (2008) and then further cemented his reputation as one of Korea's talented emerging directors with "The Yellow Sea" (2010) is currently working on the much anticipated "Gokseong" (working title) (W/T).
Planned for a release in the first of this year, it's being backed by Fox International Productions (FIP) and will be distributed by Fox Korea — the third Korean film to be funded by the U.S. studio following "Running Man" (2013) and "Slow Video" (2014).
The film takes place in a village where a detective (Kwak Do-won) and a shaman played by Hwang Jung-min ("Ode to My Father") seek to investigate a mysterious rumor that continues to spread.
‘No Country for Young Men' 
Also being backed by 20th Century Fox is Im Sang-soo's curious new film "No Country for Young Men" (W/T) that is expected to be released in the second half of 2015. Starring Ryoo Seung-bum ("The Berlin File" (2013)) and Go Joon-hee, it follows four characters who find a significant amount of money by accident, but when one of them is later caught by the millionaire and then brutally assaulted, they seek revenge.
Im's films tend to travel widely at festivals such as Cannes where "The Housemaid" (2010) and "The Taste of Money" (2012) both competed for the coveted Palme d'Or reflecting his appeal abroad.
‘Veteran' 
Looking ahead to the summer, Korea's action-maverick auteur Ryoo Seung-wan's ("The Berlin Film") latest "Veteran" (W/T) is scheduled to hit screens providing audiences with a chance to see his latest audacious action set-pieces. Starring Hwang Jung-min who is also playing the renowned mountaineer Um Hong-gil in "The Himalayas" (working title) that's due out later this year in addition to the aforementioned "Gokseong," he's looking to have another busy year.
In "Veteran," Hwang plays a detective who pursues a young millionaire called Tae-oh (Yoo Ah-in) — the third-in-line to a large conglomerate — after he beats up a man who helped him on one of his cases.
‘Assassination' 
Also planned for a summer release is Choi Dong-hoon's "Assassination" featuring a stellar ensemble cast including Ha Jung-woo, Jun Ji-hyeon, Lee Jeong-jae, Oh Dal-soo and Cho Jin-woong. Choi's engaging films consistently attract large numbers as seen with "The Thieves" (2013) that amassed close to 13 million admissions and also starred Jun Ji-hyeon and Lee Jeong-jae.
This film takes place in the Japanese colonial era (1910-1945) where a small band of fighters are ordered by the resistance government to take out a pro-Japanese group in the 1930s.
‘The Throne' 
Period films have become an increasingly prevalent feature of Korean cinema especially during the holiday seasons such as the lunar New Year and Chuseok. As such, this coming lunar new year (Feb. 18-20), the sequel "Detective K: Secret of the Lost Land" is due to hit local screens, but more eagerly awaited, perhaps, is Lee Joon-ik's "The Throne" due for a release in the second half of this year andstarring Song Kang-ho who experienced unprecedented success in 2013 when "Snowpiercer," "The Face Reader" and "The Attorney" all became huge hits.
Lee Joon-ik has established himself as one of the leading figures in the industry following the success of "The King and The Clown" (2005) and has made a number of period films. His latest one also features Yoo Ah-in ("Veteran") and Moon Geun-young — her first film in eight years — and is set during the reign of King Yeongjo (Song Kang-ho) that follows the life of Crown Prince Sado (Yoo Ah-in) who is condemned to death by his own father after deemed unfit to rule.
Other films 
Other significant local releases this year include the Korean war blockbuster "Western Front 1953" starring Sol Kyung-gu as well as the crime drama "The Classified File" directed by Kwak Kyung-taek and political drama "Inside Men" starring Lee Byeong-hun.
In addition to "The Throne" there are a number of period films also hitting screens including "Memories of the Sword" starring Lee Byeong-hun and Jeon Do-yeon initially scheduled for a release last year but pushed back. Jeon also stars in the romantic drama "The Shameless" (W/T) along with Lee Yoon-ki's "A Man and a Woman" (literal title), which are both expected to hit screens this year.
With other films including "The Great Tiger" (literal title) directed by Park Hoon-jung ("New World" (2013)) starring Choi Min-sik playing a hunter searching for the last surviving tiger on the Korean Peninsula during the Japanese occupation also set to attract audiences later this year, 2015 promises to be yet another exciting twelve months for the industry.
The writer is a film columnist for The Korea Times.

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January 5, 2015
Oh Dal-soo 1st Korean Actor to Draw 100 Million Moviegoers
Source: The Chosun Ilbo
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Oh Dal-soo has become the first Korean actor to attract 100 million moviegoers with a string of box-office hits, ranging from "The Thieves" to "Miracle in Cell No. 7" and "The Attorney," each of which drew audiences of over 10 million.
According to the Korean Film Council, the combined number of viewers of his previous 39 films totaled 93.6 million and his latest, "Ode to My Father," had drawn 6.57 million as of Friday.
Oh appears as the best friend of the hero in "Ode to My Father," and together they experience the trials and tribulations of recent history, starting with the Korean War via the coal mines of Germany and the jungles of Vietnam.
He is set to appear in a raft of other films set for release this year.

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January 6, 2015
Film about modern Korean history tops 8 million viewer mark
Source: YonhapNews
SEOUL, Jan. 6 (Yonhap) -- A domestic film depicting the life of a typical father from Korea's older generation has attracted more than 8 million viewers, its investor-distributor said Tuesday.
"Ode to My Father" exceeded the milestone at 8 a.m. 21 days after it opened on Dec. 17, CJ Entertainment said. The pace is four days faster than "Miracle in Cell No. 7" that attracted 12.8 million viewers in 2013.
The success comes amid controversy over the film's alleged attempt to beautify the past under the rule of authoritarian regimes and idealize it.
Directed by Youn Je-kyun, who is best known for the 2009 hit film "Haeundae," "Ode to My Father" tells the story of an ordinary father named Deok-su (played by Hwang Jung-min) who sacrificed himself to support his family through the country's turbulent modern history from the 1950-53 Korean War till recently.
The human drama drew a record 751,253 people on Thursday alone, the largest-ever number of viewers for a single film on New Year's Day.
Industry watchers say that if the current trend continues, the movie is expected to become this year's first movie to top 10 million in attendance.

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January 6, 2015
'Ode to My Father' stirs nostalgia, controversy
By Ahn Sung-mi (sahn@heraldcorp.com) KPOPHERALD

Film sheds light on father’s generation, on track to hit 10 million viewer mark 
A Korean drama film that delves into the repercussions of the Korean War and the generation that fought through the period has taken the local box office by storm, amid political controversy surrounding the era. 
“Ode to My Father,” directed by Yoon Je-kyoon (“Haeundae”), topped the local box office for the third consecutive week, garnering over 8 million viewers, according to the official box office tracker, Korea Film Council. 
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
(CJ Entertainment)
It is on pace to become the first film this year to reach the 10 million viewer milestone.
The 126-minute film is the story of Deok-soo, a man who lived through Korea’s tumultuous period from the 1950s to 1980s. 
When the Korean War breaks out, Deok-soo, played by veteran actor Hwang Jung-min (“New World,” “You are My Sunshine”), is separated from his younger sister and his father and becomes the breadwinner of the family. Even at a young age, he dares to take all kinds of difficult and odd jobs in order to provide for his mother and other siblings in Busan, where the family fled to from North Korea. 
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In search of opportunities, he traverses the globe, including working as a migrant worker in coal mines in Germany. It is there where he meets Korean nurse Young-ja, played by “Lost” star Kim Yun-jin, and they get married. 

The heartwarming film follows Deok-soo’s journey of five decades, sacrificing his youth and dreams to support his family. In doing so, he stands as witness to some of the most important events of modern Korean history, including the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the reunion of separated family members in the 1980s. 
The move was for director Yoon a personal tribute to his father. 
“My father passed away when I was in college and I didn’t have a chance to say thank you,” said Yoon at the press conference before its premiere in November. “I hope the film serves as the channel for communication between the old and young generation.”
image(CJ Entertainment)
He used his parents’ real names for the two lead roles: Deok-soo and Young-ja. The film’s popularity was slower than expected when it premiered in mid-December.
The buzz started when some film pundits dubbed it as a “conservative” flick for emphasizing the sacrifices of older generations and justifying nationalism, and President Park Geun-hye used a scene from the movie to call on Korean people to show more patriotism. 
Park is a conservative leader whose rise in politics was greatly aided by nostalgia for old days as her father -? military strongman Park Chung-hee -- led the country’s rise from postwar poverty. The late Park ruled the country from 1961 until his assassination in 1979. 
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
Citing a scene in the film in which the husband and wife suddenly halts an argument and pay a hand salute to the national flag when they hear the national anthem playing, she emphasized the need for patriotism in order for Korea to overcome national adversity. 

Many in the political circles watched the film, including Rep. Kim Moo-sung, chairman of the conservative ruling Saenuri Party, and Rep. Moon Jae-in, the liberal opposition New Politics Alliance for Democracy’s flag-bearer in the 2012 presidential election. 
“There were scenes in the film that emphasized patriotism, but that was the reality of that time period,” Rep. Moon told reporters after watching the film. 
“It is unreasonable to say that the film is conservative,” said the liberal lawmaker. 
For Shin Tae-wook, a 32-year office worker, the film was a moving drama, regardless of the controversy. 
“It was an opportunity to see what my parents and grandparents had to go through in the past. I am very grateful for that,” he said. 
Another moviegoer in her 70s said: “It brought out the memories of the past. It was the hard times, but without it, Korea won’t be the same country as now.” 
She came to watch the film with her friends after her daughter recommended it to her, she said. 
The film’s popularity is also extended to Busan, as many people are flocking to the southern port city to see different venues featured in the movie, especially Gukje Market (the Korean title of the film). 
The largest traditional market opened in 1946 and served as the place for war refugees to set up stalls in order to make a living, just like Deok-soo in the film. 

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January 6, 2015
‘Ode to My Father’ stirs nostalgia, controversy
By Ahn Sung-mi (sahn@heraldcorp.com) KPOPHERALD

Film sheds light on father’s generation, on track to hit 10 million viewer mark 
A Korean drama film that delves into the repercussions of the Korean War and the generation that fought through the period has taken the local box office by storm, amid political controversy surrounding the era. 
“Ode to My Father,” directed by Yoon Je-kyoon (“Haeundae”), topped the local box office for the third consecutive week, garnering over 8 million viewers, according to the official box office tracker, Korea Film Council. 
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
(CJ Entertainment)
It is on pace to become the first film this year to reach the 10 million viewer milestone.
The 126-minute film is the story of Deok-soo, a man who lived through Korea’s tumultuous period from the 1950s to 1980s. 
When the Korean War breaks out, Deok-soo, played by veteran actor Hwang Jung-min (“New World,” “You are My Sunshine”), is separated from his younger sister and his father and becomes the breadwinner of the family. Even at a young age, he dares to take all kinds of difficult and odd jobs in order to provide for his mother and other siblings in Busan, where the family fled to from North Korea. 
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
In search of opportunities, he traverses the globe, including working as a migrant worker in coal mines in Germany. It is there where he meets Korean nurse Young-ja, played by “Lost” star Kim Yun-jin, and they get married. 

The heartwarming film follows Deok-soo’s journey of five decades, sacrificing his youth and dreams to support his family. In doing so, he stands as witness to some of the most important events of modern Korean history, including the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the reunion of separated family members in the 1980s. 
The move was for director Yoon a personal tribute to his father. 
“My father passed away when I was in college and I didn’t have a chance to say thank you,” said Yoon at the press conference before its premiere in November. “I hope the film serves as the channel for communication between the old and young generation.”
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
He used his parents’ real names for the two lead roles: Deok-soo and Young-ja. The film’s popularity was slower than expected when it premiered in mid-December.
The buzz started when some film pundits dubbed it as a “conservative” flick for emphasizing the sacrifices of older generations and justifying nationalism, and President Park Geun-hye used a scene from the movie to call on Korean people to show more patriotism. 
Park is a conservative leader whose rise in politics was greatly aided by nostalgia for old days as her father -? military strongman Park Chung-hee -- led the country’s rise from postwar poverty. The late Park ruled the country from 1961 until his assassination in 1979. 
restmb_jhidxmake.php?idx=5&simg=20150106
Citing a scene in the film in which the husband and wife suddenly halts an argument and pay a hand salute to the national flag when they hear the national anthem playing, she emphasized the need for patriotism in order for Korea to overcome national adversity. 
Many in the political circles watched the film, including Rep. Kim Moo-sung, chairman of the conservative ruling Saenuri Party, and Rep. Moon Jae-in, the liberal opposition New Politics Alliance for Democracy’s flag-bearer in the 2012 presidential election. 
“There were scenes in the film that emphasized patriotism, but that was the reality of that time period,” Rep. Moon told reporters after watching the film. 
“It is unreasonable to say that the film is conservative,” said the liberal lawmaker. 
For Shin Tae-wook, a 32-year office worker, the film was a moving drama, regardless of the controversy. 
“It was an opportunity to see what my parents and grandparents had to go through in the past. I am very grateful for that,” he said. 
Another moviegoer in her 70s said: “It brought out the memories of the past. It was the hard times, but without it, Korea won’t be the same country as now.” 
She came to watch the film with her friends after her daughter recommended it to her, she said. 
The film’s popularity is also extended to Busan, as many people are flocking to the southern port city to see different venues featured in the movie, especially Gukje Market (the Korean title of the film). 
The largest traditional market opened in 1946 and served as the place for war refugees to set up stalls in order to make a living, just like Deok-soo in the film. 

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January 7, 2015
Box-office hit rubs off on Gukje Market
By Kim Bo-eun The Korea Times
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Shoppers look around stalls in Gukje Market in the southern port city of Busan. / Yonhap
The popularity of the film "Ode to my Father" has prompted a renaissance at Busan's Gukje Market, where part of the movie was shot.
Viewers of the film have flocked to the market in the southern port city since the release of the film on Dec. 17.
The influx prompted the Busan Tourism Organization to launch a tour focused on sites that appear in the movie.
The film _ which has been seen by more than 8 million people since its release _ revolves around Deok-soo, played by Hwang Jung-min, who lived through Korea's tumultuous period between the 1950s and 1980s. Deok-soo undergoes all sorts of hardships as he works as a coal miner in Germany and a civilian worker during the Vietnam War to support his family that runs a shop in Gukje Market.
The history of the market itself is as interesting as the film.
The beginnings of the market cropped up when Korea was liberated from Japan's colonial rule in 1945. Three years later, the market was officially named and a single-floor wooden building of 12 units was constructed to house the shops.
As the film depicts, the marketplace was a settling ground for a large number of refugees that crossed the border from the North during the Korean War (1950-1953).
The refugees, who had no ties in the city, built their livelihoods as merchants at the market. They got a hold of relief goods, military equipment and consumer goods and started selling them. The market began to play a central role as a retail outlet in the city along with the commercial districts of Gwangbok-dong and Nampo-dong.
Among the settlers in Busan, there were also literati from Seoul who had come seeking refuge. As they sought their livelihood in the market, it grew not only as a place of commerce but also as a melting pot for various rungs of society, and became the center of information and change.
The market took the form of a wholesale and retail market as the war ended and the economy started taking shape.
In 1968, nine units were renovated into concrete buildings, some 7,200 square meters of land were granted and 1,489 individual shops were registered. A year later, a cooperative was established, and it received a permit from the government.
Tourists can look around the market that sells everything from fashion items to household products to food. The highlight, however, is sitting at the outdoor stalls and trying the assortment of snacks that are offered. Included in the wide variety are tteok-bokki (rice cakes in hot sauce), patjuk (red-bean soup) and hotteok (pancake stuffed with brown sugar).

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January 9, 2015
'Ode to My Father' Breaks 8 Million Mark
Source: The Chosun Ilbo
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The melodrama "Ode to My Father" hit the 8 million mark in cinema attendance on Tuesday. 
The film drew over 210,000 moviegoers on Tuesday alone, bringing the total to 8.17 million, the Korean Film Council said on Wednesday. 
The flick achieved the feat 21 days after its release. It will likely surpass the 10 million mark.
"Ode to My Father" portrays a man's sacrifices for his family, braving the coal mines of Germany and fighting in the Vietnam War.

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January 9, 2015
REEL Talk: Korean film in 2015 
Source: Arirang
Last week we took a brief look at how Korean cinema fared in 2014 but now it's time to look ahead to what this year has in store. Joining us for a preview of what to look forward to in 2015 is our film critic Pierce Conran.
So Pierce, what are the first big titles we can look forward to this year?
We've already got two major films lined up or this month. Next week, we will get CHRONICLE OF A BLOOD MERCHANT. 
Based on a Chinese novel, it is set in the 1950s in a village where men must sell their blood, to prove their good health, before being allowed to marry. The film features two major stars, Ha Jung-woo and Ha Ji-won and it is actually the second film directed by Ha Jung-woo.
A week later we will get the 1970s crime saga GANGNAM BLUES. It takes place during the redevelopment of Gangnam, and focuses on all the gangs circling around it. Yu Ha returns to the jopok genre after 2006's modern classic A DIRTY CARNIVAL and the film features Korean idol Lee Min-ho from THE HEIRS.
Sounds like an exciting start to the year And I suppose that will bring us into Lunar New Year. Any major releases lined up?
There are two confirmed for the moment, including the first of seven Joseon era period films this year. That one is the detective action comedy sequel DETECTIVE K: SECRET OF THE LOST ISLAND. Kim Myung-min returns as the bumbling private eye in another mysterious case along with his sidekick played by Oh Dal-su.
The other film is the biopic C'EST SI BON which is the story of popular folk band Twin Folio as a young band in the 1960s. As a nostalgia-infused and romantic youth comedy drama the film could be just the right thing for the holiday. It stars Jung Woo and Han Hyo-joo as well as Kim Yun-seok and Kim Hee-ae as the same characters in the 1980s.
Now last year was already a big year for period films but you're saying we have SEVEN on the way in 2015?
It seems that way for the moment, and I know it's a huge number but the trend still seems to be going strong, judging by the enormous successes of ROARING CURRENTS, THE PIRATES, THE FATAL ENCOUNTER and KUNDO: AGE OF THE RAMPANT. Only time will tell if audiences have grown tired of the genre. One imagines that interest will eventually have to wane.
What can you tell us about the other big period films lined up for the year?
It's hard to say when they will be released exactly but among them are MEMORIES OF THE SWORD, an action film starring Lee Byung-hun and Jeon Do-yeon that was expected late last year. Beyond that are the Pansori drama THE HYMN with Ryoo Seung-ryong and Bae Suzy, the king's court drama THE THRONE with Song Kang-ho and YOO Ah-in, the steamy drama EMPIRE OF LUST with Shin Ha-gyun and Jang Hyuk, the hunter action-drama THE GREAT TIGER with Choi Min-sik and the period thriller TREACHEROUS RETAINER with Kim Kang-woo and Ju Ji-hoon.
Sounds like a lot to take in Are there any other major films to look out for?
Seung-wan, Im Sang-soo, Na Hong-jin and Choi Dong-hoon. Action expert Ryoo will be back with VETERAN, a gritty action thriller starring Hwang Jung-min, who is currently featuring in ODE TO MY FATHER. Choi has the glitzy 1930s action thriller ASSASSINATION with Ha Jung-woo, Jeon Ji-hyun and Lee Jung-jae. Na is back with GOKSEONG, which has yet to settle on an English title, another thriller starring Hwang Jung-min. Last we have Im's action film MY FRIENDLY VILLAINS with Ryoo Seung-bum.
So much to look forward to Is there anything that you're particularly excited about?
I really like Na Hong-jin, so I'm definitely eager for GOKSEONG and I think VETERAN and ASSASSINATION could be a lot of fun. In the immediate future, I'm quite excited for GANGNAM BLUES since Yu's A DIRTY CARNIVAL is one of my favorites. We won't see it until very late in the year but THE GREAT TIGER could be very interesting, it comes from the director of NEW WORLD, one of last year's best Korean films.
Definitely a lot of movies there. Thank you for the outlook, Pierce. 
Reporter : ssung86@arirang.co.kr
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