Jump to content

[Drama 2021] Move to Heaven, 무브 투 헤븐: 나는 유품정리사입니다


larus
 Share

Recommended Posts

Very heartwarming story, one of the better dramas that I've seen in these past years. The case stories were 10/10. (Navillera too could've been added to this list too if I didn't put it on pause after crying nearly every episode. I already know something's going to happen to the poor gramps, and am afraid to continue. :sweatingbullets:)So So So very glad this was 10 episodes and not dragged out. Technically, I wouldn't mind watching 16 of this or a season 2 but I'm satisfied with what's given. I'm hoping to see more kdramas follow this.

 

Geuru's a sweet gentleman and he's very lucky to have the support of his friends, neighbours and etc. Especially Namu watching over him. I undermined how much effort was put into the trauma cleaning business - and how Geuru pretty much knew how to run everything independently. *Minus the driving. :w00t:

He sure is a patient with his uncle tho, I would've just threw a hiss and gave Sanggu no pay for doing practically nothing. 

 

Still a bit mad that Sanggu chose to steal the house deed (knowing how much the house meant to Geuru).It's just me but even if I were that desperate, I wouldn't steal someone else's things for a collateral (especially a huge thing like that). I'd rather sign away my life to that gambling madame. 

Oh wells, at least he learnt his lesson and is becoming a good-enough guardian to Geuru.

If they do chose to give this a S2, I request OCN like bits of him and the social worker Sooyoung. *OCN bits as in those crime dramas where ML has little suggestive romantic interactions that you hope lead to somewhere (but tbf they go nowhere 'cause MLs too busy solving cases). He'll be partner material once he does a bit more cleaning up. I don't mind if they don't tho as it's not important. :P

 

As for Ji jinhee's character, I teared up when they showed us the accumulated gifts fo his brother but bro, why tho - why did he never tell the truth /left Sanggu a letter of any sorts and let Sanggu discover the reason himself. I guess Sanggu's refusal to face him could explain that but still kinda sad they never resolved their conflict.

 

:byebye2:

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

56 minutes ago, tofumochu said:

Very heartwarming story, one of the better dramas that I've seen in these past years. The case stories were 10/10. (Navillera too could've been added to this list too if I didn't put it on pause after crying nearly every episode. I already know something's going to happen to the poor gramps, and am afraid to continue. :sweatingbullets:)So So So very glad this was 10 episodes and not dragged out. Technically, I wouldn't mind watching 16 of this or a season 2 but I'm satisfied with what's given. I'm hoping to see more kdramas follow this.

 

@tofumochu I watched all of Navillera and loved it. I put it up there right next to Move To Heaven. Yes, lots of tears each episode, but it's absolutely a beautiful and heartwarming story from beginning to end. I hope you can muster up the courage one day to pick it back up again.

 

I thought 10 episodes was perfect as well, but I'm with you that I wouldn't have mind if it was 16 either. I'm hoping for a season 2 with the same MTH trio, plus more of Sooyoung's character. 

 

56 minutes ago, tofumochu said:

As for Ji jinhee's character, I teared up when they showed us the accumulated gifts fo his brother but bro, why tho - why did he never tell the truth /left Sanggu a letter of any sorts and let Sanggu discover the reason himself. I guess Sanggu's refusal to face him could explain that but still kinda sad they never resolved their conflict.

 

This part was so :tears:. It's really amazing how you can get to know a person's heart/mind from their belongings. I also wondered why their misunderstanding couldn't be resolved sooner too, but I took that Sang Gu was so deeply scarred by it that he refused to hear his brother out. I do still think that it's better late than never that he found out his brother missed and loved all those years. He would never have healed had he not. I'm sure his brother is grateful that he officially became Geu Ru's guardian and is looking after him on his behalf.

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another interesting fact that reminds me of how Super Junior Leeteuk's father died.

 

 

And a great analysis about the symbolism in this drama

 

 

This kind of people's mind always amazes me. I have been watching movies and series for over 15 years but never get to realize the symbolism behind. I guess i'm just that dense.

  • Like 8
  • Insightful 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2021 at 4:07 AM, bee_wannabe said:

Another interesting fact that reminds me of how Super Junior Leeteuk's father died.

 

I remember reading about Leeteuk’s father and grandparents years ago. So sad what happened. My understanding is suicide among senior citizens is sadly common, oftentimes due to poverty and not wanting to be a burden to their family. It seems the writer wanted to bring awareness of various social injustice/hardships through the stories and although they may be gone, they were precious people.

 

Workplace negligence Kim Seon U (Ep. 1)

Hard-working/dedicated employee who pressed on despite his injury and loving son who wished to provide a better life for his parents.

 

Elderly neglect Lee Yeong Sun (Ep. 2-3)

Elderly woman who lived alone with dementia, but a mother who never forgot her long-promise of gifting her son a suit.

 

Domestic abuse/violence Lee Seon Yeong (Ep. 3-4)

Young woman not respected/loved by her ex-boyfriend, but she was a kindergarten teacher adored by her students.

 

Disproval of same-sex relationships Soohyun and Ian Park (Ep. 5)

Two men who faced hurdles of unconventional relationship, but loved each other unconditionally. Their message of bravery was so powerful.

 

Elderly abuse/discrimination Kim In Su and wife (Ep. 6)

Doting couple who kept their promise to leave the world together. Even though he faced abuse/discrimination at work, he was not broken by it. He was a loving husband to his wife. Their secret greenhouse and the symbolism of each flower/plant were so beautiful. I loved the dahlia’s meaning of “Happy to know your heart.”

 

Bullying Kim Su Cheol (Ep. 7)

Good son, brother and friend. It was clear why Sang Gu thought the world of him and vice versa. I still can’t get over how he secretly wanted Sang Gu to meet and reconcile with his brother.

 

Stateless children Matthew Green/Kang Seong Min (Ep. 9)

Innocent young man who ended up belonging nowhere due to the complications/flaws in the adoption process. By the reporter/former caretaker sharing his story to the public, may he not be forgotten.

 

On 5/18/2021 at 4:07 AM, bee_wannabe said:

And a great analysis about the symbolism in this drama

 

The usage of sign language in the story was so meaningful. Geu Ru's parents first learned it to communicate with Geu Ru and to help him articulate himself. Then, Geu Ru's father used it to help the grieving mother (who's mute) speak up on behalf of her son. 

  • Like 7
  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gardening is my mom's favorite hobby. I spent a lot of time with her during stay-at-home and ended up learning quite a bit about flowers/plants from her. So, I really really loved the revelation of the Kim's couple secret greenhouse. Each plant had its special meaning and they were surrounded by them everyday - just the two of them. When they left the world together, I was so proud of Geu Ru that he made sure they were still surrounded by them during their memorial and final send-off.  But, it didn't end there. Afterwards, social worker U-Rim wanted Sang Gu to take care of one of Mr. Kim's plant - dahlia. How beautiful that we learned it means "Happy to know about your heart." (In the case with trauma cleaners, that's likely how they feel with each person that they care of.)

 

giphy.gif

 

About Sang Gu, I've concluded that he is the opposite of what he says. He told Geu Ru that he hates taking care of things. But, he does this...

 

giphy.gif

 

He's really a softie inside.

  • Like 8
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I re-watched episode 1. I realized when we first saw Geu Ru’s father sign language to him live, viewers who do not know the language would not have known what he last conveyed to Geu Ru. The translation was not revealed to us until after the memorial where we saw Geu Ru tightly holding onto his father’s urn and flashing back to this moment.

 

giphy.gif

 

After Geu Ru nodded “yes”, we see his father satisfied with smile. Then, he takes off and disappears into the haze.

 

giphy.gif

 

Loss, grief/mourning - where you can no longer see, hear/speak to a loved again, is such a difficult concept to fathom. The phenomenal chance of Geu Ru’s father being able to tell Geu Ru that he’ll always with him before left, offered hope of comfort and consolation that is so needed by the bereaved. On the flipside, by him able to see Geu Ru nod “yes’ back to him that he understood his message, hopefully gave him peace that his son will be okay.

 

Last, when Geu Ru wanted to take his father (in the urn) home, others tried to stop him, but Ahjussi Park supported him and told him to take his time to scatter his father's ashes. Allowing time for Geu Ru to be ready for it was so important.

 

 

  • Like 6
  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, taeunfighting said:

Last, when Geu Ru wanted to take his father (in the urn) home, others tried to stop him, but Ahjussi Park supported him and told him to take his time to scatter his father's ashes. Allowing time for Geu Ru to be ready for it was so important.

 

Yes.  GR was resistant to physical touch (like a lot of kids on the spectrum).  He didn’t like his father hugging him.  But here he was hugging the remains of his father - holding on to his memory as it were.  The way he processed grief was very different to neurotypicals but nonetheless painful.  :tears:  It was very well done.  

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@nrllee Totally agree that this part was really well done. Luckily, Geu Ru didn't seem completely sensitive/resistant to touch. This was Geu Ru’s father’s last vision before he passed away in the ambulance. A flashback of him and little Geu Ru holding hands while walking on the beach.

 

giphy.gif

 

In another flashback, we see that it was Geu Ru who reached out to hold his father’s hand at the aquarium while they remembered Geu Ru’s mother.

 

giphy.gif

 

It was so touching to see him able to do that and comfort his father. Even his father was amazed with him.

 

giphy.gif

 

When Geu Ru tightly hugged his father’s urn at the memorial and wanted to take him home. He wasn’t ready to let go yet. Also, he didn’t fully grasp how his father can still always be with him. But, the hugging circled back in the last episode.

 

 - SPOILERS AHEAD -

 

When he finally rested his father’s ashes, he ran back to his father’s tree and hugged “him” tightly. Seemingly still not able to let go. Eventually, he heard his father speak to him and they talk:

 

Father: "What did I always tell you?"

Geu Ru: “Although you can’t see someone, it doesn’t mean they’re not with me."

Father: "As long as you remember...

Geu Ru: ...they are not gone.”

Father: "That’s right."

 

Spoiler

giphy.gif

 

Geu Ru then looked up to the sky. I think this symbolized that everything was settled and his father has moved to heaven.

 

Spoiler

giphy.gif

 

I thought it was beautiful how his hugging in episode 1 was his inability to physically let go while in the last episode, he finally was able to do so. He finally understood how his father will always be with him - in spirit.

  • Like 6
  • Sad 2
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Just started this drama and am looking forward for Geuru and his uncle to find understanding as they both can learn from each other. 

 

Am at Episode 3 where they let Uncle drive again after his 60 traffic violations

 

:hwaiting2:

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, agenth said:

 

Am at Episode 3 where they let Uncle drive again after his 60 traffic violations

 

LOL. Uncle/Sang Gu is such a good balance to the story. His character is so funny. Protective/mother-hen Na Mu too. It's hilarious when the two bicker with each other. The trio make a great team.

 

Thanks for the update on a potential season 2! My fingers are tightly crossed for it.

  • Like 4
  • Blob 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know someone mentioned that this drama should be savoured, episode by episode. I probably will do that sometime later during a rewatch. But I couldn't stop watching, so I finished it and I'm feeling so RAW and in PAIN. But good pain. 

 

I loved the ending, even though it's so open-ended and has many questions raised. But then I saw this might actually get a Season 2, and deservedly so!!!

 

It's on #1 in Netflix Korea, so let's do a prayer circle for season 2!

 

the lonely island crying GIF by Agent M Loves Gifs

 

 

  • Like 8
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, agenth said:

I know someone mentioned that this drama should be savoured, episode by episode. I probably will do that sometime later during a rewatch. But I couldn't stop watching, so I finished it and I'm feeling so RAW and in PAIN. But good pain. 


That would be me.  But I understand why everyone would just want to zip through it.  Because the episodes don’t seem to end in a spot where you feel it should?  It just feeds straight into the next ep like one long playing movie and before you know it, you’ve breezed through 3 in one sitting :lol:.  And the eps are short (45min).  So I just forced myself to stop just before a new case comes up which can be mid ep.  That seems to be a more reasonable place to take breathers between watches.  :lol:
 

Sigh...if they do go with S2, can I humbly request that JJH keeps reappearing like an Angel in GR’s life?   I know the ending seems to imply that GR finally “let him go” on his own personal “move to heaven”, but their father-son bond is so tight I can’t imagine his dad just disappearing like that henceforth.  

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Swoon/Netflix released a video of “Unboxing My Character” with the MTH trio. Lee Je Hoon, Tang Joon Sang and Hong Seung Hee go over some belongings in their actor and character boxes.

 

 

Here are a few things about their characters that were interesting:

 

Geu Ru - Puzzle

TJS explains that trauma cleaning is like putting a puzzle together so every time they finish a case, he completes one. In a clip from MTH, we hear Geu Ru’s father teach him that, “There comes a moment when you begin to see what the deceased wanted to say and the thoughts they wanted to share.” Geu Ru asked, “Is it like solving a puzzle?” and the father responded, “Yes, you can say that.” (This is one of the reasons why I enjoyed the story so much – the investigative-like aspect of it – with Geu Ru being our precious detective. How he deduces each person’s life story and resolves their remaining wishes is brilliant.)

 

Na Mu - Tree

Na Mu means “tree” in Korean. HSH says that Na Mu and Geu Ru are inseparable so she believes that the tree represents their relationship. (I also think Na Mu is like a tree that offers shelter/shade for Geu Ru. She naturally feels the need to protect and shield him from any harm.)

 

Sang Gu - Boxing Gloves

LJH says that boxing represents Sang Gu’s story. He used to be a boxer. He had a good friend who he really cared about, and he taught him how to box. (I also think because of his childhood experiences, Sang Gu became protective himself and boxing was a mechanism to guard himself.)

 

Na Mu – Diving Goggles

Na Mu works as a part-time diver at the aquarium. HSH says Na Mu wants to make Geu Ru’s dream come true and for him to come to the aquarium to see her. When she sees him happy, it makes her happy as well. That is the main reason why she works there. (I think Na Mu knows Geu Ru is fond of aquariums because his mom and dad frequently took him there as a child. She is such a sweetheart.)

 

Geu Ru- Camera

TJS says that Geu Ru has a photographic memory. He remembers everything he sees and hears. He can recall things he has seen and heard once, and he can express them to others when he needs to. (Through Geu Ru’s father’s teachings and guidance, Geu Ru’s traits are his strengths and MTH’s best assets. I commend the writer for sharing this perspective of his condition.)

  • Like 6
  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Move to Heaven" Director Kim Seong-ho "I wanted to contain the stories of the people around me"

AKR20210521097300005_02_i_P4.jpg

 

"I remember a lot of thoughts of my deceased family while watching the work, or the reaction that I hugged my mother next to me."

 

On the 21st, director Kim Seong-ho, directing the Netflix original drama'Move to Heaven: I am a keepsake organizer' (hereinafter referred to as'Move to Heaven'), which describes the story of the keepsake organizers who had no choice but to leave the world alone. Met with burn. From non-regular workers living alone in Seoul to overseas adoptees who were unable to become Americans or Koreans after being forced to leave Korea due to dislocation. This work, which contains various social issues, is currently receiving favorable reviews, ranking 2nd in the Netflix popularity rankings in Korea.

 

Director Kim, who has been receiving responses from all over the world since the release of the work, laughed, "You did a really good job because you told me that my heart has warmed after watching this drama, and I feel that it is rewarding."

 

AKR20210521097300005_01_i_P4.jpg

 

“I think movies and dramas are a medium that can more effectively communicate the stories of ordinary people, people around us, and the socially underprivileged. One of the most important reasons for my directing was, after all, about the socially underprivileged. It's because I felt a great charm to do it through the story of a keepsake organizer." 'Move to Heaven' quite calmly expresses the subject of social weakness and death that can flow overly emotionally.

(google translate)

More

 

https://www.yna.co.kr/view/AKR20210521097300005

 

 

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

On 5/17/2021 at 7:03 PM, taeunfighting said:

Geu Ru totally shined in this story. One of my favorite parts was when Na Mu asked him what he thought of his uncle, he recited all of Sang Gu's gross habits and traits at first. But, Geu Ru remembered that his dad taught him what makes someone a good person is how they try to understand others. Through how he witnessed Sang Gu contributed to helping each of the cases, he deduced that his sam chon is a good person (in a perplexing way). LOL. It's really amazing how logical he is.

 

I really liked the story between Sang Gu and Lee Jae Wook's character, Su Cheol. I thought we got to see a deeper and softer side of Sang Gu through their relationship. Su Cheol was such a good "kid". I felt my heart clench when he found Su Cheol's note on the back of the Move To Heaven business card. LJW did an amazing job here.

 

I really love that scene.  In their job as cleaners, Mr Han and Geu Ru don't interact or communicate with the deceased so they have to piece together clues about the person's character from their belongings.  Mr Han taught his son early on, using his logical and photogenic mind, how to judge a person or a situation based on the non verbal clues.  He processes facts objectively and I don't think he relies much on what the person tells him but more on what he observed.  I'm sure there is an algorithm somewhere in his mind.^^  What Geu Ru sees is Sang Gu doing things for him despite not agreeing and through verbal objections.  Those to him are signs of a generous heart.

 

My heart broke when I read Su Cheol's handwriting in the back of the business card.  We don't know how Su Cheol know about Jeong-U but it explains why Jeong-U was at the fight.  Su Cheol quit boxing due to his brain injury but has to fight underground for money to start the business.  Sang Gu was not privy to his health condition during the fight.  He decided to land the knock out punch to help Su Cheo get the consolidation prize payout.   Unfortunately, the injury was severe due to his risk.  Sang Gu has carried the guilt ever since, paid for the mistake with prison time while continuing to fund Su Cheol's hospital bills.  When he cleaned out the room, Sang Gu stumbled on his friend's medical records.  That's when he realized Su Cheol's injury may have been less severe if there was not already predisposed risk.  It helps him sort out and overcome his years of guilt.  

 

I too love their friendship, especially how Su Cheol worked hard to overcome his timid personality to become a winner.  The scene between Sang Gu and Su Cheol's sister was very touching. She was tired from the burden of caring for her brother yet can't help feeling a sense of relief and freedom with his passing.  A mix of shame and guilt for admitting those feelings.  At the hospital, she criticized Sang Gu's guilt as a selfish for prolonging her brother's life support/surgery.  Yet, later after the funeral, she thanked him for his faith and persistence as it would have been hard for her to do willingly.  Both were able to accept and let go.

 

 

On 5/18/2021 at 10:27 PM, taeunfighting said:

 Afterwards, social worker U-Rim wanted Sang Gu to take care of one of Mr. Kim's plant - dahlia. How beautiful that we learned it means "Happy to know about your heart." (In the case with trauma cleaners, that's likely how they feel with each person that they care of.)

Chalk me down to another person who love the social worker and gruff trauma cleaner's dynamics in the episode.  This episode is perhaps one of my favorite in the drama. I can't even fully verbalized how beautiful the script is.  U-Rim's perception of Sang Gu in the beginning was not the greatest.  He refused to help clean when first came onto the case, criticizing Mr. Kim's actions for taking his wife's life.  To Sang Gu, his murder suicide was not an act of love.  They didn't get off on a good start.  The episode slowly walked him and us through the events and life of the humble janitor.  We/Sang Gu discovered Mr Rim's secret garden of love for his wife; full of beautiful flowers rescued from discarded dying plants by residents in the apartment complex he worked for.  Like Mr Kim who were under appreciated and disrespected in his twilight years, these flowers no longer held beauty and value to their original owners.   But under the loving care of the janitor, they were brought back to life and gave joy to the elderly couple.  What was so touching for me is the fact that Mr. Kim valued the plants he revived.  He diligently labeled the plants with plan to return them to the owners.  Perhaps the reason was also because he knew his time is short and the happiness the greenhouse gave them was borrowed.  I love that he tended the garden for the happy memories of his wife even as she is no longer home.  As for our "couple", Sang Gu slowly learned about the kind of man Mr Kim was, eventually realizing that they have met before.  He recalled the love and care he showed to Mrs Lee wheeling her home, flowers in hand.  For U-Rim, seeing the cleaners bringing their precious potted plants one last time to send the couple off changed her impression of Sang Gu.  Later that evening, she received the wreath from Move to Heaven.  I thought the dahlia gift to Sang Gu also is her admission that she is glad to know his true nature and kind heart. 

 

We discovered later that the humbled janitor in fact was an esteemed mentor to a CEO of a big company.  He had positive influence on others and was loved for his character when younger.  We get to know the kind old man who seemed cruel in fact lived his whole life by kindness.

 

I only saw till episode 8 but I wanted to stop and share my feelings before I forget.  I will be back with another post.

  • Like 4
  • Love 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, bedifferent said:

I really love that scene.  In their job as cleaners, Mr Han and Geu Ru don't interact or communicate with the deceased so they have to piece together clues about the person's character from their belongings.  Mr Han taught his son early on, using his logical and photogenic mind, how to judge a person or a situation based on the non verbal clues.  He processes facts objectively and I don't think he relies much on what the person tells him but more on what he observed.  I'm sure there is an algorithm somewhere in his mind.^^  What Geu Ru sees is Sang Gu doing things for him despite not agreeing and through verbal objections.  Those to him are signs of a generous heart.

 

Me too. How Geu Ru's mind processes the trauma scenes and identifies the important clues is so fascinating. I admire his matter-of-fact logic and emotional neutrality in his work and in judgment of others, such as his uncle. (He strangely reminds me a lot of Shi Mok.)

 

In an interview, Tang Joon Sang talked about Geu Ru's white head phones. He said Geu Ru likes listening to classical music. It calms and consoles him. He usually puts them on when he's beginning his movement through a trauma scene. When we viewers hear the classical music playing, I think it's trying to portray Geu Ru's calm state of mind in contrast to how most people would react. He's able to maintain equanimity and most importantly, respect for the deceased, as he goes through and tidies up their belongings.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My current kdrama list is full of gore, crime, ambitious women, law students & mafia related stories. MTB brought me back to heartwarming stories. it's ALL worth the time and the perfect excuse to fall our tears down :criesariver:
I don't normally cry in dramas BUT my tears automatically just fall down. Simple execution yet impactful scenes will made you finish in one-sitting with loads of tissue haha 

Looks like TJS is the next Oh Jung Se. He is so on-point! I had the same feels for him & Joo Won (in Good Doctor). I can't wait to see him in Racket Boys as a normal teenager & THANK GOD, Netflix will release it!!!

 

Lee Je Hoon as Sang Gu showed how versatile he is. Can he do a rom-com drama soon??? 

 

Ji Jin Hee as a father & brother is GOLD. 

YES to SEASON 2!!

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This drama is a true gem!:heart:  I'm recommending it to everyone who will listen lol.  I finally finished ep 10 today and I must say, it was an odd ending.  I hope there is a 2nd season.  Such sweet beautiful stories.  Definite life lessons in this drama.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/2021/05/26/entertainment/movies/Netflix-Move-to-Heaven-trauma-cleaner/20210526163100406.html
'Move to Heaven' screenwriter found inspiration in grief and growth


May 26, 2021

 

AF5ADE85-E6D4-461E-8416-ABC30DF518F1.jpg
A scene from the Netflix original series 'Move to Heaven,' written by Yoon Ji-ryun [NETFLIX]


“I think I was always more curious about death than others. And there was a time when I was so swept up in the sadness and mourning after the sudden death of a loved one. I was deliberating on whether I should continue writing, and that was when I looked up books written by those who lost someone they loved, and how they heal.” 


Screenwriter Yoon Ji-ryun, the creator of the Netflix original series “Move to Heaven,” whose other works include the mega-hit KBS drama series “Boys over Flowers” (2009), said at a recent online interview with the Korea JoongAng Daily that it was during this time of grieving that she discovered an essay book written by trauma cleaner Kim Sae-byeol, titled “Things that are left behind” (translated). A trauma cleaner refers to someone whose job is to remove, clean, decontaminate and sanitize an area where a person has died.   


“I already knew what a trauma cleaner was but when I read the book, his [the author's] perspective on death and the deceased was very much parallel to what I wanted to know, and I wanted to convey my story from such viewpoint.” 


“Move to Heaven” is centered on two trauma cleaners, Sang-gu and Geu-ru, and their jobs cleaning the homes of people who have died and passing on their meaningful possessions to their family members.   


Although the 10 episodes in the series are not based on the book, Yoon said that it was the motivation for her to write the story. She first read the book in August 2015 and immediately contacted Kim through its publisher, She wrote the script over two years after interviewing him and researching the stories of other trauma cleaners in Japan and the United States. She also had the chance to visit a site where Kim and his crew were cleaning.   
  
“The scene where I visited was after the death of an elderly lady in her 70s,” the writer said. “She died alone [in her home] from the pain of a terminal disease. As Kim and I sorted through her possessions, we could figure out what kind of life she had led and learn her story. We talked about how much she meditated daily, how much alcohol she drank and what kind of snacks she ate when she drank. We could see and discuss what her life was like when she was younger. That experience had an enormous influence on how I crafted ‘Move to Heaven.’” 


In the series, the stories about the deceased, although entirely fictional, are all closely linked to social issues ranging from dating violence, solitary deaths, homosexuality and Korean adoptees. Yoon said that she chose stories that she was drawn to, or “those whose homes I personally wanted to go to and clean.” 


Yoon also explained why she decided that the character of Geu-ru would have Asperger's syndrome.   


“Geu-ru had to be a messenger that doesn’t realistically exist in real life,” she said. “Even when the client doesn’t want it, even refuses it, he obstinately has to do what he feels is right. It’s not that he’s arrogant or vain, but I was worried that he might come off looking bad to the viewers or might be too tiring.   


“Also as the messenger, I didn’t want him to be sad or gloomy when he’s passing on the news or possessions,” she continued. “What we’re telling in this story is already sad enough as it is. Geu-ru is the only person who doesn’t cry in this story. He’s a messenger without emotions, but he opens the gateway for people to sympathize and communicate. So a character with an Asperger's Syndrome who is emotionally deficient became a very crucial protagonist in this story.” 


Yoon admitted that she deliberated over the genre of the story and whether she should maintain a more lighthearted tone or make it a thriller series, which are popular nowadays.  


“But I was curious about those who passed away,” she said. “I wanted to know what lives they led, what they loved, and if they were in love, what thought would be on their minds as they were drawing their last breaths. And if they were clinging on to life, what was their reason? Thinking about that was what made me sad, but that sadness strangely was comforting to me, so I wanted to convey what I felt in the story.” 


The series which was meant to provide warmth and comfort to viewers, also had an impact on Yoon.  


“Yes, it is a project that changed me,” she said. “Before ‘Move to Heaven,’ I doubted whether or not I could write beautiful stories that could stir people’s hearts. I felt that way for a long time but in the process of writing this story, I was comforted and healed. I found myself imagining writing about love stories or those fluttery emotions when one falls in love, and it gave me strength and became an inspiration for me to write new stories.”

 

 

BY LEE JAE-LIM   [lee.jaelim@joongang.co.kr]

 

——

 

https://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/2021/05/26/entertainment/movies/Netflix-Move-to-Heaven-Lee-Jehoon/20210526154900594.html
Actor Lee Je-hoon learns to take nothing for granted


May 26, 2021

 

694DB75E-2325-40F5-91DE-51F3B56B830A.jpg
Lee Je-hoon [NETFLIX]


Actor Lee Je-hoon shines brightest when he's playing the hero.  


Currently, he's taken on such roles in the Netflix series “Move to Heaven,” released on May 14 and on weekends in the hit drama series “Taxi Driver” airing on SBS. However, both the characters he plays are far from perfect, leaving room for character development and for the story to flow.  


In “Move to Heaven,” Sang-gu is an ex-boxer who becomes the guardian of his older brother's son, Geu-ru (played by Tang Jun-sang), who has Asperger's Syndrome and works as a trauma cleaner. The brother's will states that Sang-gu will be entitled to the family's properties, but only under the condition that he takes care of Geu-ru.  


While the pair initially find it tough to bond, Sang-gu eventually warms up to Geu-ru and the work of cleaning trauma scenes, all the while providing him the protection he needs.  


In “Taxi Driver,” Lee plays taxi driver Kim Do-gi, who avenges injustices on request from his clients. But he grapples with his traumatic past and deliberates whether his ways of revenge are truly “just.”   


“I was initially a little bit worried about the two series overlapping,” Lee said on Monday when he spoke to the Korea JoongAng Daily during an online interview about his role as Sang-gu in the Netflix series. “I thought the two projects might divide public interest, but to my relief, people seem to enjoy each of them individually.” 


According to the actor, he came across the Netflix series first, which he said influenced his perspective on society and ultimately, his decision to star in “Taxi Driver.”   
  
“After my decision to star in ‘Move to Heaven,’ I became more interested in people and society,” Lee said. “The heart of the series is ultimately about people’s attention and interest. When I look back on my own life and think whether there was ever a time when I properly reached out, let alone expressed a word of comfort to those who were dear to me, I can't think of any. I felt awkward about it. Moreover, these are difficult times, what we’re going through. But, I believe that we can pull through, and be happy if we spend more time asking about our loved ones — contact them and ask them how they’re doing and about their health, tell them about what you’ve been up to. I hoped to convey such message through the series.”

 

Spoiler

1D903C07-57A9-47F7-8E8A-7A097130F086.jpg

Lee Je-hoon [NETFLIX]


On the day of the interview, the actor had just finished filming the last episodes of ‘Taxi Driver’ and said that while he hadn’t quite gotten the time to read any reviews, he had gotten some feedback from his close acquaintances. 


“The most memorable review I’ve heard was from a friend who said tears kept flowing while they were watching,” he said. “They said it’s funny how they sympathized with each death even though they haven’t had such experiences themselves. I think they saw the sincerity of the writer and the hard work the crew put into this story. Come to think of it, all of the 10 episodes are so, so precious to me and I was sorry to see it end. If possible, it would be great if the story could be extended and the stories of minorities and people who wish to be heard can be represented [in another season].” 

 

Spoiler

960E64DD-FF62-461B-9ADB-E3FF208F462B.jpg

Sang-gu (played by Lee Je-hoon) initially agrees to take care of his nephew Geu-ru (played by Tang Jun-sang) for the money but as they work together as trauma cleaners, he slowly begins to warm to him. [NETFLIX]


The actor also predicted that more series with omnibus episodes will be released. 


“I don’t know about films, but for series, I think there’s going to be more like ‘Move to Heaven,’” he said. “As we live in the contemporary era, I think people are very much influenced by the news and stories that they hear every day and it’s same for me too. We are constantly thinking about how we should live and what opinions we should voice to create a positive change. As an actor, I believe the decisions I make about what projects to choose are also impacted [by such social phenomenon].” 


When asked what news interests him, the actor indirectly answered by revealing a short film that he will be directing.   


“The reason why I chose to create this film — I wrote the script as well — was that I wanted to talk about the thoughts that youths in their 20s and 30s have,” he said. “To be more specific, how they see the economy, use it, consume it, and what they want to gain from it. My film will be available via the streaming service Watcha around November.” 


Although the main narrative centers around the trauma scenes that Sang-gu and Geu-ru encounter, their personal stories also surface through the episodes. To physically prepare for his role as ex-athlete Sang-gu, the actor underwent intensive training for four months prior to filming. 

 

Spoiler

61272696-B28C-42C0-BD1E-716732EA05EF.jpg

Lee worked out almost everyday four months prior to the shooting to build up the toughness that his character Sang-gu is defined by.[NETFLIX]


“I was working out at least six days a week,” he said. “Physically, Sang-gu had to give off an aura of an intense, tough character, so I worked really hard on my body. In prior interviews, I always said that I wanted to try out boxing when asked what I wanted to do next, so it was very fulfilling for me. I also added a little twist to my character. Originally, Sang-gu was only involved in the sport through illegal gambling, but I suggested that he should be an ex-pro-athlete. Boxing, to me, feels like a very honest and sacred form of sport. There’s only two set of fists, fighting each other in a bath of blood and sweat. And I wanted to portray Sang-gu’s innocence through this sport, and thankfully enough, producers let me try that out.” 


Lee and Tang also had a chance to meet with an actual trauma-scene cleaner named Kim Sae-byeol when filming was completed, footage of which is available on Netflix Korea’s YouTube channel. 


“What I felt from meeting Kim was that it would be extremely difficult to do this job without a warm heart and respect for the deceased,” Lee said. “I mean, usually, how workers feel about their profession or what mindset or principles they have, is for them to decide. But this job of cleaning trauma scenes is like being a mediator between those who have left this earth and those who remain, and the situations and emotions that they have to deal with ask a lot of them. You know, we hear sayings like don’t take your loved ones for granted, but they don’t really touch us. But through his story and ‘Move to Heaven,’ that saying somehow felt more true. To be able to express affection and appreciation for your family, or your loved ones whom you haven’t seen for a long time, is very important. I think I’ll retain this understanding, and act on it both now and in the future.” 

 


BY LEE JAE-LIM   [lee.jaelim@joongang.co.kr]

 

 

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20210525000657
[Herald Interview] Lee Je-hoon on what is left behind after death

Actor talks about Netflix original series ‘Move to Heaven’


By Im Eun-byel | May 25, 2021


7C0E5543-6D38-4B95-9789-8DEB262AA71E.jpg
Scene from “Move to Heaven” (Netflix)


For an actor, it would be an honor to leave behind a collection of works someday, Lee Je-hoon, 36, said. 


Of all the steps in Lee’s 14-year acting career, Lee said he was the most nervous about the recent release of Netflix original series “Move to Heaven.” He stars in the series as Sang-gu, an ex-convict who works as a “trauma cleaner,” cleaning up crime and accident scenes and organizing the belongings of the deceased. 


“I was the most nervous about this work, of how people would react to this story,” Lee said Monday during an online interview. “I was emotionally touched when reading the script, shedding tears.” 


The 10-part series was released on Netflix on May 14. Written by star scriptwriter Yoon Ji-ryun, who is acclaimed for hit series such as “Angel Eyes” and “Boys Over Flowers,” this one was inspired by a 2015 essay by trauma cleaner Kim Sae-byeol. 


“When preparing for the series, I had a chance to meet Kim. This production owes it to his life and experience, as Yoon wrote the script after reading his essay,” Lee said. “What Kim does is very honorable but it must also be emotionally overwhelming. I could see that he truly cares for the deceased and those who are left behind.” 


In the series Sang-gu works with his nephew Gru, who has Asperger’s syndrome. Gru is played by 17-year-old Tang Jun-sang.


“Tang is 19 years younger than me. I was worried about communicating with Tang due to the age gap. I thought I would have to guide him as an actor with more experience,” Lee said. 


“But actually it was Tang who allowed me to go free on the set,” he said. “Sang-gu is a tough guy who has lived a rough life. He does not play by the rules. About 10 to 20 percent of Sang-gu’s character was made on the set.”


Asked what he would like to leave behind when his life ends, the actor answered, “I would like to have a ‘filmography of the late Lee Je-hoon’ list on Netflix or to have a DVD collection of my works. It would be a great honor.” 


Following the Netflix release of “Time to Hunt” in 2020, Lee is seeing another exclusive release on the global streaming platform.


“Unlike other Netflix original series, this is more of a human drama which offers what other series could not,” the actor said. 


Lee hinted there might be a second season. 


“At first, 10 episodes seemed to be enough. But after wrapping up, I think there should be more. This should not end as a 10-part story. The story has to continue,” he said. 

 


By Im Eun-byel (silverstar@heraldcorp.com) 


More articles 

Spoiler

https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/art/2021/05/688_308714.html
Lee Jae-hoon becomes ex-con and crime-scene cleaner in Netflix's 'Move to Heaven'


By Lee Gyu-lee | 2021-05-12


F12F4A9D-7D9C-47FB-8A5B-E9ACDB6DC16E.jpg
From top left, clockwise, actress Hong Seung-hee, director Kim Sung-ho, and actors Lee Jae-hoon and Tang Jun-sang pose for pictures during an online media event for "Move to Heaven," Wednesday. Courtesy of Netflix


Actor Lee Jae-hoon has proven his versatility throughout his career ― from a dogged criminal profiler in the hit series, "Signal," to a rowdy independence activist in the historical film, "Anarchist from Colony." In the upcoming Netflix series, "Move to Heaven," the actor took on the role of hardened ex-con Sang-gu, whose life changes after working as a trauma cleaner, or a cleaner of scenes of crimes or violent accidents. 


"My character is always cynical and views the world with a skeptical perspective," Lee said during an online media event to promote the series, Wednesday. "He has always been lonely and expects his life to stay that way, until he becomes part of the 'Move to Heaven' trauma cleaner service and encounters the clients' stories." 


Directed by Kim Sung-ho, whose work includes the family film, "How To Steal A Dog," the series revolves around people at a trauma cleaners service ― ex-con Sang-gu (Lee), his nephew, Geu-roo (Tang Jun-sang), who has Asperger syndrome, and Geu-roo's friend, Na-moo (Hong Seung-hee).


As they clean out the possessions of deceased people, they uncover the stories they left behind and take on the additional job of delivering them to the loved ones of the departed.


The story, inspired by trauma cleaner and writer Kim Sae-byul's nonfiction essay, "Things Left Behind," was penned by Yoon Ji-ryun, who is best known for writing the mega-hit series, "Boys Over Flowers."


Lee's character is a former boxer who became a fighter at illegal fight clubs in order to make money. "He doesn't take care of himself and had a rough life," Lee said of his role. "There were a lot of scenes where I had to fight in the ring… I'm excited to show tough, martial-arts action through this series." 


507C7133-C292-4BF7-BBA8-3FE349BB327E.jpg
A scene from the series / Courtesy of Netflix


Director Kim expressed his hope that the series will offer a message about caring for others, especially in these tough times amidst the pandemic. 


"A lot of people are suffering amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. If we can just take a moment to look around us, there are many things that need our attention," he said. "In the series, the cleaning cases involve unattended deaths and other social issues, which could be solved through better human connections and meeting people face-to-face. So I think that this series will provide a chance to reflect on our current reality." 


Lee also added that he came to think a lot about the isolation and lack of communication in society nowadays. "As someone who's part of this community, I learned how serious these issues can be. And (just as I did), I hope that viewers can relate to the story and are reminded to care about those around them," he said, adding that he would tear up while reading the script of every episode.


Tang's character, Geu-roo, has difficulty interacting with other people and expressing his emotions due to his disorder. But he uses his skills in noting details and memorizing to deliver the stories of the deceased to their loved ones. 


The actor said that he first learned about the job of trauma cleaner through the series. "When I read the script, it was the first time I'd heard about trauma cleaners. Then I came to understand the job fully after reading the book, 'Things Left Behind,'" he noted. "As I did, I hope many people can learn about this meaningful job through the series." 


"Move to Heaven" is set to release on Netflix on Friday.

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..