Quantcast
Jump to content
0ly40

[Drama 2018] Miss Hammurabi, 미스 함무라비

Recommended Posts

I second the above opinion about this show making me question my own beliefs and ideologies. Almost every episode makes me do some soul searching and how nothing is ever black and white. No wonder the writer had IBR carry a copy of ' To kill a mockingbird ' in the first episode. That has been my favourite book for a long time now and I am a die hard fan of Atticus Finch. 

 

Somehow, while thinking about the book I remembered that IBR gives that book( it seems so) in the flashback to PCOR and possibly that might have been influencial in her deciding to become a judge after all the attrocities that she suffered in her past. Just a wild guess probably but it wouldn't be surprising if that happens.

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess we're all learning to examine ourselves more and not rush into hasty judgement and decisions, thanks to the drama.  :)

 

Regarding O Reum's case, I wonder why the scriptwriter had her character regressed rather than progressed.  He must have known that O Reum will face backlash for being hasty again. Based on all his wisdom shared in the court cases, he doesn't seem the kind to simply let his lead female character do something foolish again without learning from her experience. 

 

I wonder if there's a message that the writer is trying to convey from that regression.  Maybe it's to convey the point that while it's good for change to take place, it's not something that one should effect right away without meticulous consideration of all possible actions and repercussions and that persistent hasty & emotional decisions would not lend credibility to the people who are trying to lead the change.

 

From ep 10 preview, it looks like O Reum is having it bad. Let's hope she has finally learnt her lesson.  

 

As for Im Ba Reun, he's a blessing to O Reum. I'm glad that he's steadfast in his feelings for her all these while. :wub:

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@jl08, from personal experience i think it’s not easy to change oneself. I fail all the time over a short period of time. Sometimes I’m in it before I even realize it. I think it might be the same for OR. She has her own strong sense of justice and her own strong convictions so it will probably take a while for her to find a good compromise or balance rather than reacting so quickly all the time without thinking of the consequences. I’m just glad that IBR is there to offer her a different point of view. 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, bebebisous33 said:

 

I agree with that OR is a controversial character to the extent that she can't be real existing outside the drama. But isn't it the whole point of the drama though? The People's Supreme Court of China (the highest court in PRC) made an exception few days ago by recommending MH, among other legal dramas, for the simple reason of having such emotional, impulsive Park Cha Oh Reum in the drama, because the controversy surrounding her defines the value of the drama.  She is the embodiment of Hammurabi who upholds steadfastly the hard principle of "An Eye for an Eye,  a Tooth for a Tooth."  In many different ways, she is only a "catalyst" that escalates the conflicts and exposes the problems within the legal system of SK.  She propels the change, both internal and external, among the people around her.

 

It's tempting to point finger at OR for her reckless action in episode 9, but she, following the advice of BR, reports to Judge Han first--which is already different from episode 4 and 5 where she just starts a petition without consulting her colleagues.  It is Judge Han who reports to the head, not her, but why is she the one to be blamed?  Is it because she is a woman, a rookie judge who has no seniority and thus she should stay quiet for the superficial cohesion and integrity of an organization? This HAPPENS all the time in all organizations and society. The way I see is that episode 9 poses a question to the audience:  Do we as audience, like those judges in the court, are "socialized," or rather, indoctrinated, to the degree that we will sacrifice our moral principle in the name of the "collective"? The ones in the lowest rung, often women, take the blame and become the scapegoat, even though they are doing what they are supposed to do. I also have the feeling that the judge being reported in episode 9 is a scapegoat. It  is a universal rule that a judge should not use his or her personal connections to influence the ruling. OR is scolded for overstepping in earlier episodes for trying to reopen the trial of the mother who lost her son by finding her a lawyer. In episode 9,  what the other judge has done is even more obviously criminal, violating the codes of conduct in court. That's why Judge Han, despite years of friendship, still reports him.  

 

The only problem though is that PD/writer is always so thrifty with OR's psyche. We are spared of her struggle.  By episode 9, we see that both Judge Han and BR have become much more humane characters. We sympathize with IBR, because he is the only full, real character in the entire drama where the audience is informed of his interior process and struggle, and that's why OR is the most relatable character. OR, in contrast, is all action and all impulse. Even her family background is conveniently written with many cliches. (I mean who can go to law school with what happens to her family, with the huge debt left by her father, a mother with dementia needing medical care? Not in "Hell Joseon" that is the nickname for SK now). In other words, OR is a mythical figure, not a real "character" even in a fictive universe of the drama. 

 

Judge Moon  (the scriptwriter) gave a wonderfully rich interview few days ago. I wish I had time translating the entire interview, which is quintessential to understanding the local context of the entire drama. The domestic reception of the drama, particularly OR, is drastically different. SK audience root for OR and want more OR to exist in their legal system and society under naver news entries. 

 

In the interview, when asked about the casting, Judge Moon first mentions Sung Dung-il. He says that he thought about Sung Dung-il from Reply Series when penning Judge Han, and therefore there is no need to elaborate more. Then he mentions Go Ara. He says Go Ara's personality is also very straightforward, just like OR. However,  Go Ara asked Judge Moon why OR is angry all the time, because she herself isn't this type of person. Judge Moon then sheds an important light here:  “Park Cha Oh Reum is a character created in the aftermath of Sewol Ferry Tragedy. She represents the pain, the rage South Koreans felt at the time.” When she challenges Judge Han and BR for stopping her for petition in episode 5, She speaks for the people's outcry at the time: "You want me to stay indifferent and do nothing? The people around me are drowning in water and you want me to watch them (drowning?)" Judge Moon emphasizes that “OR is a figure remembering the pain and rage, not towards a particular incident.She represents a feeling of discontent towards the systematic failure in the world. ”

 

(I don't know if anyone here has read about the entire fiasco of Sewol Ferry. PGH regime delayed the rescue, almost on purpose, and even punished those who tried to use their private boats to rescue the kids.)

 

Another key issue Judge Moon brings up is a pointed critique on the internalized gender bias within Korean TV shows and movies, as well as among audience. This passage has been retweeted 25K on among SK twitter users https://twitter.com/Yeong21016/status/1008513875463925760/photo/1

 

I will translate the passage and leave food for thoughts: 

 

  Question: "Isn't Park Cha Oh Reum too emotional, with her tearing up in the court and getting overtly-involved in other people's business? How do you respond to such a criticism?" 

 Judge Moon: " Yes. You are right. She does have this side to her, and this defines her personality (note: the name isn't a real name. It means "brimming with emotions" and "spurring actions").  But she will continue to grow, right?  However, I want to raise this question. Isn't Judge Han emotional too? Beyond tearing up in court, he yelled in the court room and got angry at his two junior judges indiscriminately. Why isn't there accusation against him? In the TV shows and films of our country (i.e. SK),  there are so many  "tough guys" who explode like a bomb whenever their male ego is triggered. Why are we (as audience) so tolerant for certain emotion, but so uncomfortable towards others? This is something worth pondering  upon. 

 

Judge Moon has been a vocal critique on sexism in SK.  Here is another translated entry on Male Rage and Male Rage:

http://femik.tistory.com/28?platform=hootsuite

 

Everybody is entitled to his or her take on the drama. I am here offering some local perspectives, specifically the authorial intention. We don't have to like OR. Contrary to the popular view, I am relieved to see how she hasn't changed much because she continues to challenge the system, even the method isn't agreeable for some. I don't want her to become cast into a narrow spectrum of family and romance like in episode 6-8.

 

 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ohani

Quote

I agree with that OR is a controversial character to the extent that she can't be real existing outside the drama. But isn't it the whole point of the drama though? The People's Supreme Court of China (the highest court in PRC) made an exception few days ago by recommending MH, among other legal dramas, for the simple reason of having such emotional, impulsive Park Cha Oh Reum in the drama, because the controversy surrounding her defines the value of the drama.  She is the embodiment of Miss Hammurabi who upholds steadfastly the hard principle of "An Eye for an Eye,  a Tooth for a Tooth."  In many different ways, she is only a "catalyst" that escalates the conflicts and exposes the problems within the legal system of SK.  She propels the change, both internal and external, among the people around her.

 

It's tempting to point finger at OR for her reckless action in episode 9, but she, following the advice of BR, reports to Judge Han first--which is already different from episode 4 and 5 where she just starts a petition without consulting her colleagues.  It is Judge Han who reports to the head, not her, but why is she the one to be blamed? Is it because she is a woman, a rookie judge who has no seniority and thus she should stay quiet?  Do we as audience, like those judges in the court, are "socialized," or rather, indoctrinated, to the degree to accept such a problematic social convention? This HAPPENS all the time in all organizations and society. The ones in the lowest rung, often women, has to take the blame, even though they are doing what they are supposed to do. It  is a universal rule that a judge should not use his or her personal connections to influence the ruling. OR is scolded for overstepping in earlier episodes for trying to reopen the trial of the mother who lost her son by finding her a lawyer. In episode 9,  what the other judge has done is even more obviously criminal, violating the codes of conduct in court. That's why Judge Han, despite years of friendship, still reports him.  

1. And that's exactly my problem. I don't agree with that principle "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" as it is too simple and archaic. A judge should be impartial. OR might have compassion and feel empathy for others, yet she lacks impartiality which is exactly what she reproached to the other judge. She considers herself better and superior, nonetheless she is just the product of her environment (lower social class). But she is not really different, it is just that she defends different kind of people. While the judge has been influenced by the people from Gangnam, she is influenced by people living in poverty. She has the preconception that "poor people" are good people who got tricked and abused by rich and powerful persons. But let just face it: even poor people are not a synonym for good people.

Moreover, the media can have a negative influence on people. I am French and each time I come home, I am so bothered by the news on TV because they lack objectivity. The news are too focused on France, they lack deep analysis and self-reflection/criticism. The problem is that nowadays people tend to judge people very quickly due to the new technology. In the last episode, it was clearly pointed out how a single person can manipulate others (protests) or the media can manipulate people's opinion. And that's a dangerous thing to do: react on emotions... Before any action, people should try to get more info and analyze. That's why it is important not to let the new media and technology influence you, take your time and think things through before judging anything.

 

2. OR was hurt, when she saw the judge arrested as she didn't expect him to be arrested. Nonetheless he had committed a crime. OR is now an outcast because she revealed the "rotten apple". Yes, judge Han was the one who reported him, yet she is blamed because she had made that statement earlier about the rotten apple. Han had told her that the judge would never forget her speech. The other judges will avoid her as she is seen as a betrayer and whistle-blower. We shouldn't forget what happened to other whistle-blowers. Some were condemned or had to flee their country. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bebebisous33 said:

@ohani

1. And that's exactly my problem. I don't agree with that principle "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" as it is too simple and archaic. A judge should be impartial. OR might have compassion and feel empathy for others, yet she lacks impartiality which is exactly what she reproached to the other judge. She considers herself better and superior, nonetheless she is just the product of her environment (lower social class). But she is not really different, it is just that she defends different kind of people. While the judge has been influenced by the people from Gangnam, she is influenced by people living in poverty. She has the preconception that "poor people" are good people who got tricked and abused by rich and powerful persons. But let just face it: even poor people are not a synonym for good people.

Moreover, the media can have a negative influence on people. I am French and each time I come home, I am so bothered by the news on TV because they lack objectivity. The news are too focused on France, they lack deep analysis and self-reflection/criticism. The problem is that nowadays people tend to judge people very quickly due to the new technology. In the last episode, it was clearly pointed out how a single person can manipulate others (protests) or the media can manipulate people's opinion. And that's a dangerous thing to do: react on emotions... Before any action, people should try to get more info and analyze. That's why it is important not to let the new media and technology influence you, take your time and think things through before judging anything.

 

2. OR was hurt, when she saw the judge arrested as she didn't expect him to be arrested. Nonetheless he had committed a crime. OR is now an outcast because she revealed the "rotten apple". Yes, judge Han was the one who reported him, yet she is blamed because she had made that statement earlier about the rotten apple. Han had told her that the judge would never forget her speech. The other judges will avoid her as she is seen as a betrayer and whistle-blower. We shouldn't forget what happened to other whistle-blowers. Some were condemned or had to flee their country. 

 

 It is the scriptwriter's intention to use her character to show how each person is limited in his and her perspective. It is NOT only her character though. Let's face it. The ER room incident also forces BR to compromise his principle and recognize his own limit. He has to resort to his personal connection to get his mother preferential treatment, and yet he comes to realize that there are worse-off patients than his mother. He is reprimanded by the doctor for using his privilege. The next day when he went to work, he for the first time comes to sympathize and understand the predicament of those who protest in the front gate. Rich people, like represented by OR rich oppa, are naturally embedded and protected by the law because they implant their people in the court or have connections --they don't even need to bribe the judges, while the disadvantaged ones can only petition in the most seemingly ineffective way to let their voice heard--they do not have money to hire lawyers, or pay "law brokers" to find decent, qualified lawyers. That's why this episode begins by portraying the" law brokers" talking with a potential customer about pricing. 

 

I am with you that the approach " an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" is problematic,  and the poor people are not necessarily good people, but the message of episode 9 is  WHO has access to the law and who doesn't, who gets protected and who is excluded. OR challenges the other Judge in the cafeteria because he only takes care of people who are as privileged as him, while neglecting those 30000 workers toiling away in the factory. OR's action this time is a more daring one, because she tries to expose the complicit structure between the government, the law, and the rich in SK. I live in the States, so this phenomenon is too close to home.

 

Yes. The scriptwriter makes OR a whistle-blower, an "individual" who defies conformity and seniority preferential culture (like the ordering in the restaurant, which totally cracks me up). In the preview of episode 10,  she told the big boss with smiles in a calm voice, "If there will be bloodshed, I will shed the blood." My sense is that OR is willing to take the responsibility for being a whistleblower. She even refuses OR's involvement with the case first when she wants to report the case directly to the head. Anyway.  It's really a bummer that JTBC switched the schedule, since episode 9 and 10 should be a unit. 

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MH is really a thought provoking drama which  poses so many philosophical questions.

 

 

On 6/21/2018 at 12:50 PM, bebebisous33 said:

@ohani

1. And that's exactly my problem. I don't agree with that principle "An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" as it is too simple and archaic. A judge should be impartial. OR might have compassion and feel empathy for others, yet she lacks impartiality which is exactly what she reproached to the other judge. She considers herself better and superior, nonetheless she is just the product of her environment (lower social class). But she is not really different, it is just that she defends different kind of people. While the judge has been influenced by the people from Gangnam, she is influenced by people living in poverty. She has the preconception that "poor people" are good people who got tricked and abused by rich and powerful persons. But let just face it: even poor people are not a synonym for good people.

Moreover, the media can have a negative influence on people. I am French and each time I come home, I am so bothered by the news on TV because they lack objectivity. The news are too focused on France, they lack deep analysis and self-reflection/criticism. The problem is that nowadays people tend to judge people very quickly due to the new technology. In the last episode, it was clearly pointed out how a single person can manipulate others (protests) or the media can manipulate people's opinion. And that's a dangerous thing to do: react on emotions... Before any action, people should try to get more info and analyze. That's why it is important not to let the new media and technology influence you, take your time and think things through before judging anything.

 

 

 

@bebebisous33

I would like to defend the author, Judge Moon, and OR for the role of emotions in legal reasoning.

 

To most of the general public, we should treats law as a science, legal reasoning as a purely deductive process, and emotion as the enemy of reason. Thus, emotions are individual, arbitrary, unanalyzable, and ultimately a threat to the proper functioning of the legal system. The traditional assumption that those trained in the law should not traffic in emotion; hence judges, and lawyers, are viewed as emotionless practitioners of pure reason. However, with the limited exposure to legal reasonings (mostly US constitutional law) that i have got over the years, i feel that judges are not always impartial, in fact their rulings are mostly in line with their personal/culture/political/religious beliefs. If we should treat law as a science and judges should be impartial, then we would have only one conclusion to a case regardless who is a judge. Nevertheless, it is hard to have an unanimous rulings because different judges have different emotions and ideologies to interpret the laws.

Thus, It’s hard to act according to law without emotion. It’s easy said than done.

 

As @mojobobo said, justice/law without compassion/emotion is tyranny. I would like to use the current refugee situation in the States as an example. What the Trump’s administration does is not illegal. They found a loophole and took full advantage of it. However, they acted without compassion for those young children, and now it is a mess; it is inhuman way to treat human beings. If we follow the traditional legal reasoning that we should not mix emotion with law, then why are there so many people protest about this? The law has been there for long time, the Obama’s administration faced the same challenges in 2014, one may or may not agree with how the previous administration execute the law, at least they put on enough emotions and compassion into the issue that they did not separate young children from their parents and they did not put children in cages. I agree that emotion alone with not solve the problem. Nonetheless, those emotions are a trigger point that make people try to find solutions. If we do not express our angers, people would assume that we are fine with the status quo. Hence, nothing will change.

 

 

===========

@ohani

About OR as a mythical figure, i would like to think that she is IBR’s alter ego. OR is what BR wants to be but can not. He has the same opinions about most issues like OR but unlike her, he has never taken any actions; hence he creates her to fill in his inaction. From the first ep, when he wanted to help the old lady whose son died during the surgery, but he did not because he reasoned that it would result in nothing. It is OR who steps in and helps the old lady. He is angry about PJ plagiarized his idea, but he does nothing until OR pushes him to report it to the chief. Then it is OR again and again tell him about the value of family and how women feel about sexual harassment.

If we think that OR’s is alter ego, it is easier to accept that a young woman who has financial hardship can be an ace in her class and even smarter than IBR. I just hope that we would not get the ending where everything happens in 16 eps is IBR’s dream.

It is so interesting that Judge Moon challenges the sexism, but i think this is true anywhere. I remember how the media praised a male politician when he cried, but criticized a female politician when she did the same thing. When a male lawmaker cries, he shows humility. When a female lawmaker cries, she is not tough enough to be a leader.

Also, thanks so much for providing the reaction from SK viewers

 

 

============

Regarding the situation in ep 9, i feel it normal for OR to feel bad about that nice judge. She is angry about his action but not him as a person. Also, i do not think the OR expects a big outcome. Like what happened in ep 5, she may think that the chief may ask the nice presiding judge to stop but not a public punishment. This sentiment is also the theme of ep 9. Not all the poor are underprivileged, and the only one who struggle with life/work. Yet their voices and opinions are mostly overlooked, more than the middle working class. Those who protest against Judge Han and BR do not expect the rosy outcome, all they want to have is to express their grievances. Similarly, OR must be surprised that the chief takes action into the corruption. As @ohani said that judge Moon created OR as a character after the Sewol Accident, OR is a character that expresses the anger of society to people in power, yet at the same time, OR like majority of Korean public do not expect rosy, disney-like ending, because like OR, most people believe that those who are in power would do anything to protect themselves.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@ohani @star2010 First of all, I am not criticizing the author nor I am disliking OR. Actually, he is illustrating the reality of the justice system. Then I would like to point out that I am well aware that the impartiality I mentioned is difficult to achieve. However,  I wanted to indicate that OR is not different from the other judge she harshly criticized. Like I said, she is the product of her environment, just like he is. Sure, the latter represent the rich ones hence his ruling reinforces the inequity. Since I am living in Europe (France/Germany), I can only say that the middle class is usually often overlooked by government, hence the middle class contributes the most to the social system (health care, unemployment insurance, ...), while the high society can escape from paying excessive taxes by committing tax evasion. However the middle class is little by little suffocating from the number of taxes, especially in France which results in this:  the middle class is getting smaller, the gap between rich and poor is widening.     

Our actual justice system shouldn't be perceived as a synonym for real justice because laws are not connected to emotions and empathy. The wife cheated on her husband, yet she had the children custody because it is often connected to the idea that children should be raised by their mother. Since he spent little time with his daughters, he had no idea what his children wanted. If the mother hadn't received the custody in the first place, maybe this wouldn't have happened... Right now, my own brother is fighting for custody and I can tell, even if the children express that they want to live with their father, even with evidence that the mother is not taking care properly of the children (noticed by the social workers), the children are still with their mother. Emotions and even reason have nothing to do with ruling and laws. 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, celebrianna said:

@bebebisous33, I agree.  I think it would be quite scary to be judged in a court of law by emotional points of view. It’s a double-edged sword. 

Well, during the middle-age (in Europe) the populace was quite easily overwhelmed so that lynch justice often happened. F. ex. during the pest (1347-1348), in many european cities jews got persecuted and executed because they were seen as responsible for the pest. Christian thought that they had poisoned the wells because jews were less affected by the pest. Emotions are quite dangerous.

We were shown that IBR can lose control of his emotions, he is not a robot and due to his emotions, he committed a wrongdoing which he realized afterwards. OR had a good impact on IBR and Han as she forced them to pay more attention to the emotional aspect, hence they have started getting closer to the cases they are dealing. Yet, they are able to keep a certain distance. OR is still lacking in that aspect.  

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@bebebisous33, even with paying more attention to the emotional aspect, that can also lead to opposing opinions based on an individual’s belief. It’s like how the US Supreme Court judges clearly have differing values and many times those values affect their judgment. I find it quite scary even then because right and wrong are affected by people’s beliefs and objective truth is hard to get at nowadays since the judges ignore it quite a bit. I say follow the law.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Real-life judge behind ‘Miss Hammurabi’

source: http://www.koreaherald.com

 

Judge Moon Yoo-seok’s first attempt at script writing has so far been well-received by local viewers for its fresh perspective.

Moon, a senior judge of the Seoul Central District Court, wrote the script of the drama series “Miss Hammurabi,” which airs Mondays and Tuesdays on JTBC. Rather than dealing with large corporate cases or gruesome murders, the series features stories of desperate ordinary people, from the perspectives of three different judges.

Despite being a late-night series on a cable channel, the pre-produced series has seen an average viewership rating of 4.5 percent. 
 
20180618000865_0.jpg
A poster for “Miss Hammurabi” (JTBC)

The script is an adaptation of a best-selling novel of the same title originally published as a serial novel in a local newspaper. Moon, who wrote the original serial novel, is widely known for his written works, but this was his script writing effort.

“I was sorry that I couldn’t sufficiently tell the characters’ stories due to the limited space (when writing for the newspaper). Talking about making the series into a drama in spring last year, I decided to write a longer version of the story in a script format, regardless of whether it would be used or not,” Moon said, in a statement released by the drama‘s agency.

To Moon’s surprise, the production company suggested going with his script, without a co-writer or a sub-writer. Moon recalled, “I guess the company understood the ‘story’ that the script wanted to tell, despite its crudeness,” he said.

Through “Miss Hammurabi,” Moon is learning the joy of cooperation.

“The ideas and individualities of the director, the production company, the actors and the staff members make my insufficient writing much more abundant and lively,” he said.

As it was his first time writing for a production, Moon was not aware of the technical details of script writing.

“It is hard to use pop songs or jazz tracks as music royalty is very expensive. Not being aware of the fact, I included a lot of songs to express characters’ emotions and some scenes that connect with music. But it was hard to use them in reality. Thankfully, the music director wrote great original songs,” he said.

While working as a judge for some 20 years, Moon has been writing consistently, publishing best-sellers such as “Individualist Declaration” in 2015.

“I am a story addict, who imagines absurd stories even while walking. I have liked comics, novels and films since I was young. I sometimes forget to get off at my stop on the subway, imagining stories,” he said.

“For me, writing is play and leisure. I frankly write stories because I like to read what I wrote. Whether it’s corny or boring, what I write is to my taste.”

The judge also acknowledged the hard work that goes into writing.

“I am sorry when I think of many writers and would-be writers putting in a great amount of effort. In my case, I am being favored for having a profession that the story deals with,” he said.
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dear fellow Soompiers,

Thank you all for all the scintillating discussions we have here.  The debates we have here testifies that Miss Hammurabi is one-of-the-kind drama. At first, I thought this drama is the legal version of Misaeng , which is my perennial favorite, but this drama cuts deeper and wider into the established gender, cultural, social and political structures while refusing to provide a finite, correct answer--because there is none in reality. (It is not to say that this drama surpasses Misaeng--they have different purposes). 

 

DDOBOJA has translated the responses from the latest episode.  https://ddoboja.blogspot.com/2018/06/spoilersmiss-hammurabi-roundup-episode_21.html

 

It's obvious that episode 9 has sent a shock wave to the audience and forced them, (like us), to reflect upon why we feel uncomfortable about OR's actions. And this self-awareness of this particular discomfort is the purpose of this drama. How many TV shows are there today, American dramas included, that invite you to think? Most of the shows or movies just stop at "revealing" or "exposing" the problems, but this drama treats its audience as intelligent people who can think and empathize. This is the reason why I find MH a standout, even though the show isn't perfect with its own issues. 

 

1. [+946, -16] Today's episode was really crazy. Seeing Park Cha Oh Reum after she reported the department head for soliciting, I saw myself thinking: "But he was still a nice person, did you have to go that far.. she did the right thing but weirdly, I hate her" and I felt quite odd. And also, it doesn't seem like there are people who are completely good and who are completely bad,,,, This is a drama where you learn a lot of things 
 
2. [+563, -11] The only thing Oh Reum-ie did was doing the right thing but in reality, the stinging looks treat her as if she did something wrong 
 
3. [+542, -6] Im Ba Reun is just a reflection of us. With every case, take a step back and think rationally because it's not our problem, but if it approaches me, I'll be like Park Cha Oh Reum and be like the corrupted judge, and it feels like doing even more is what makes you human. I hope you think more about what Im Ba Reun did at the hospital. The emotions of a human are so complex and on top of that, there's reason. There can be one answer and conclusion or you can say it was an accident caused by a dichotomy. 
 
4. [+393, -10] She did what she had to do but my heart hurts... I really like this drama
 
5. [+173, -11] I wish there were a lot of judges like Park Cha Oh Reum     

 

@star2010

I LOVE how you treat OR as BR's alter ego. Your analysis of the dynamics between OR and BR is so spot-on that I want to hug you! :wub:  This also explains his affection towards her.  Compared to the earlier episodes, BR really likes OR in her present state than the one living in his memory. To add to your analysis, in episode 8, he just completed a case on how collective conformity and parental pressure force an introvert worker to commit suicide. Then, when they went out together with their coworkers to dine in an Italian restaurant, their seniors still decide for the entire group on what to order, resonating to the case. Again, it is OR's bluntness that breaks away from such a suffocating collective pressure and asserts her individuality. Go Ara really has a knack for comedy. The way she nonchalantly "sings" the dish's name is so hilarious and adorable that brings a big smile to L/ BR's face.  Then, he follows suit and asks for the menu himself. LOL. (Compared to the elevator scene in episode 4, he disallows her from existing the elevator). For me, such a moment, made up by ab-lib performance and reaction, is GOLDEN It also speaks for BR's becoming more like OR in expressing himself. (To use a Freudian psychoanalytic term, OR might also be his id, which he suppresses for a long time). 

 

On the side note, the scriptwriter Judge Moon said at the very beginning of the interview, he thought the rating will only be 1.8 %, but it turns up to be double. He said it is the cast's performance that makes up for his mediocre script (really? Judge Moon--you are being too humble). He said that the key to success from episode 1 is Go Ara's ab-lib performance of imitating dog-barking sounds in the subway scene. LOL (It's true though. The novel reads a tad boring to be honest).

 

Anyway. I have confidence in Judge Moon's script. If MH continues its winning streak like this, it will be definitely one of the best dramas in 2018. The drama will certainly become a turning point for all three leads. L finally proves himself to be an actor, not an idol, with a lot of potential, and Go Ara, after a long slump, reaches another new height after the success of Reply 1994,  but with a big step forward to a more mature career through taking upon a controversial role like BR. Contrary to the popular bias against her, I never found her terrible to begin with. She certainly has limits, but she can shine with a good project--and she certainly shines brightly in this drama. I am just so relieved that she left SM and entered Artist Company. Lastly but not the least importantly, it is Sung Dong-il who holds the gravitas of the entire drama. I LOVE him to pieces. His impeccable comic timing, the way he emotes in episode 8 towards his daughters, and how he yells at the other judge for mistreating his pregnant worker in episode 5.... Sung Appa is simply the BEST.  The only complaint I have up to now is that Ryu Deok Hwan is seriously underutilized in recent episodes. He's such a tremendous actor, and he is obviously Judge Moon's favorite from the interview. Hopefully, Judge Jung will join the revolution of department 44 in later episodes like in episode 4-5. 

 

Miss Hammurabi, department 44, fighting!

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New bts... :D

 

 

@ohani

Thanks for sharing Go Ara's ad-lib scenes. I wasn't aware of it. I agree that she has a knack for comedy. With regards to the background of why the writer created her character, after the Sewol tragedy, it helps me to understand her pain and anger better, and why she is so protective over the weaker ones. She is a voice that they could identify with and turn to, for help.

 

Perhaps if there were some thoughts or time taken to show some conflicting emotions that O Reum faced before she brought up the case to Judge Han or even after she confided in Ba Reun, the audience might resonate with her better even if the outcome had been the same.  Just like O Reum empathizes more with the poor and weak ones, people want to see her empathy for the judge because he's a nice person and has helped her. If only she was shown to be regretful and not defiant and in a hurry to report him, I think we can better accept her character. We will not associate her with being hasty and heartless, even if she had done the right thing. I'm not sure if it was due to the time constraint that it wasn't explored further, 

 

I like both O Reum's feisty character and Ba Reun's cool logic mode. The contrast is so stark yet adorable and necessary. They definitely complement each other beautifully and I look forward to seeing both grow together. I have no problem with ep 9 - maybe a little discomfort that she reacted so strongly yet someone has to be the whistleblower. 

 

The question that is likely to be raised is - why was she so surprised about the outcome? If she wasn't expecting disciplinary action to be taken, then what motivated her to report him? Or did she not expect such a serious outcome at all? Which means that in future, she would need to explore all possible scenarios of her actions so that she's not shocked at the end.

 

In effecting change and being the catalyst for change, she has also to change herself to cope with her emotions better and like Ba Reun said, to be selective about the underprivileged as not all are good. She needs to know that she can't protect every one of them or she'll burn out soon. That's why I'm glad that she has Ba Reun there for her to slow her down and change her as well, just like she's changing him. Isn't that wonderful? We need this scenario badly in reality. How often do we get colleagues changing each other for the better?  :)

 

This drama is awesome and I believe too, that it's a breakthrough for the 3 leads, especially for L. He is not only charismatic but has immersed himself so well in his role that he brought it to life even in Knowing Brothers.  Coupled with his voice change as a result of the drama and his awesome acting, it's a bonus that he's cast as Im Ba Reun. As for Go Ara, I've known her from "Who are you" and have liked her since then. I've seen her sing and dance in "Papa" and she not only dances well, she has the voice of an angel. I was also pleasantly surprised by her playing the piano in MH. L playing the guitar was also nice. These 2 beings are talented and beautiful.

 

Judge Han - Sung Dong-il, well, he's the pillar in this drama and he's like a gem in MH. I'm so glad to see him getting along so well with his juniors and they respecting him totally. He and Ara would be perfect in a comedy together. It's the awesome dynamics of the 3 judges, onscreen and offscreen, that brings to life, the cases and court actions. They are the reason why I can't wait for Mondays and Tuesdays. I can't resist saying that I'm attracted most by the inexplicably beautiful chemistry between L and Ara, which I never thought it would be possible.   :D

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jl08 said:

 

Perhaps if there were some thoughts or time taken to show some conflicting emotions that O Reum faced before she brought up the case to Judge Han or even after she confided in Ba Reun, the audience might resonate with her better even if the outcome had been the same.  Just like O Reum empathizes more with the poor and weak ones, people want to see her empathy for the judge because he's a nice person and has helped her. If only she was shown to be regretful and not defiant and in a hurry to report him, I think we can better accept her character. We will not associate her with being hasty and heartless, even if she had done the right thing. I'm not sure if it was due to the time constraint that it wasn't explored further, 

 

The question that is likely to be raised is - why was she so surprised about the outcome? If she wasn't expecting disciplinary action to be taken, then what motivated her to report him? Or did she not expect such a serious outcome at all? Which means that in future, she would need to explore all possible scenarios of her actions so that she's not shocked at the end.

 

 

 

This is what happens when you adapt a case-based "novel" to a drama.  Each chapter of the novel discusses a civil court case while the three characters represent the three perspectives.  So the novel is rather dry--it's definitely not Dickens or Austin's novel that draws you in. It's more like a philosophical treatise. When adapted to a drama form, the writer needs to flesh out each character more. As I say it before, the only real "complete" character is BR, who is more like you and me , "a reflection of us," as Korean netizens comment.  We know how he perceives, processes, interprets, and feel every minute happening in the drama. (Therefore, this definitely will be a life character for L since it's so well-written).  The show though have problems in uneven character developments and pacing. For instance, Bo Wang's character is completely pushed to the background while he used to serve great function of providing much-needed insider information (Bo Wang means "intelligence")  and share camaraderie, and OR's heart-warming makeshift family also disappears. I find it strange though because her "new" family is what gives her strength and optimistic outlook in life. 

 

But then, the promotion of  Miss Hammurabi describes Miss Hammurabi ( OR's character ) as a "a judge that can't be found in this world.":D  She embodies the writer's ideal that can't be realized. That's why I hesitate to analyze her motives too much.

 

With regard to why she is so surprised, I think that's because normally a judge should have received internal disciplinary action and investigation first.  However, remember Ahn Nae-sang character made a phone call?  This is not a correct procedure. He should have gone consulted with Chief Judge first (Chief Judge is the one who insists on letting OR speak in front of the assembly) My guess is that Ahn Nae-sang's character used Judge Gan as a scapegoat to distract the real, bigger corruption in the court. That's why in the preview the real conflict escalates between OR and Ahn Nae-Sang's character. I was so excited when OR says to Ahn Nae-Sang,  "If there will be bloodshed, I will shed the blood." Finally, the problems left unresolved in episode 5 have to be dealt with. 

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished ep. 9 and somehow I think OR shouldn't be Miss Hammurabi, but Miss Whistleblower instead :D *jk

 

 

200.gif?w=320&h=180&zoom=2

Edited by butterflysaga
oh yeah it should be 9.. I'm confused about their scheduling due to cancellation last week.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@butterflysaga

I think you meant ep 9?  

 

Yes, O Reum is a very controversial whistleblower. She makes us crack our brain to justify her emotions and actions and where we can't find justifications,  we let it out here and see if somebody else can do the job of justifying.  :D

 

  • LOL 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/21/2018 at 6:05 AM, celebrianna said:

OR being surprised about the logical conclusion of her complaint against the judge in episode 9 showed me that she might not have thought this through. I thought she was prepared to face the consequences but it seemed she really didn’t realize this was how it would end. 

I was surprised that she didn't realize the consequences of her actions. She was right in reporting the judge but she clearly didn't think it through. She has a tendency to run around like a bull in a china shop, just doing what she feels is right. There's nothing wrong W/her views, it's just that she has to realize people will not change if you are always in their face demanding that they change. That no matter what her views are, she has to follow the laws that are in place. She's not in the right profession to actively work to change the law.   I have a feeling her helping that poor lady that lost her son in the beginning episodes is going to get her in trouble because she did ask Yong Joon to help her. That was clearly tampering by a judge for a case she presided over. Her hearts in the right place but her methods are not going to get her very far.   

 

@bebebisous33 She is really blind to BR's situation, she does not try to understand or even see what he's going through in his life. You are right it seems like she only thinks injustice can only happen to the poor. I agree that the Gangnam judge was just as corrupt as the judge that took a bribe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...