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[Upcoming Drama 2019-2021] Kingdom, 킹덤 - Joo Ji Hoon, Bae Doo Na - Netflix - One-Episode-Special to premiere in 2021


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It is no exaggeration to say that I approached S2 with as much anticipation as trepidation - excited that the 14-month wait is finally over; terrified that it would not live up to the standard and hype of its predecessor. And yet I should have known better. After all, this is Kim Eun Hee whose brilliantly conceived finale in Signal allayed similar fears that I had leading up to it. And true to form, she once again showed me just how unwarranted my lack of faith was. Kingdom S2 is everything that I hoped for and more, with an amalgamation of stellar performances across the board, heart-stopping action and breathtaking cinematography, interwoven by an excellent script that delivered on all fronts - cerebral and emotional. 

 

What a resounding testament to the intricacy and attention to detail in the script for both seasons, that having watched S2, we realise that answers to questions were actually already hinted at earlier, if we knew where to look. Case in point being all the way back in Ep3 of S1, circa 18:43min mark, and even later at the end of S2 Ep2, with the close-up to Ahn Hyeon's face. Those deliberately transformed in S1 as an experiment to see how the plague works, are revisited once more, and would play a decisive role in the carnage that ensues down the road. It is gratifying to note how carefully KEH has plotted out the rules of this universe, and there is no random event, and any apparent aberration is consciously and deliberately addressed down the road, either with a convincing explanation, or a reiteration of that same question, to be answered in future installments. Once again, KEH shows herself to be totally in control of the script, and it is this assurance that makes the incredibly wild ride even more unforgettable, knowing that narrative wise, we are in good hands. And do I even need to mention the twist after twist that gets thrown in our faces with each episode, and what I had assumed would be the fate or at least the longevity of certain characters end up totally blown apart, in true KEH fashion. 


One of my greatest gripes about S1 had been my emotional detachment towards the characters. Not any more. This time, it swept me along an emotional tide that saw me with my heart in my mouth more often than not, aching, tearing up as character after character meets their brutal fates under KEH's ruthless pen. Main characters, side characters, even just those who appear for a brief few moments on screen - it matters not. Their desperation, desolation, courage and self-sacrifice all move me in varying degrees and I hurt as one after another must surely fall in the face of such terrible odds. This was what I have been looking for but eluded me in the previous season. This time round, S2 delivers emotional resonance with subtle finesse - the aching "Royal Father" called out to a parent who no longer knows him; a rabid glare from a beloved teacher who is himself no more; the shattered look of a man who had just taken the life of the innocent for the perceived sake of the greater good; a lonely wounded figure collapsed against the tree awaiting the man he pledged his loyalty to then betrayed; a little girl's cries as she looks for her father in vain in the streets; a dismayed gasp at the sight of bite marks on the infant she fought so hard to protect. The list goes on. And I remain just as emotionally invested, if not more with each rewatch.

 

Yi Chang's final decision and fate is a controversial one, and has incurred criticism over how that part of the narrative is handled. It certainly took me by surprise, but I really appreciate how neatly the backstory and narrative over two seasons builds up to that inevitable conclusion, one that ticks all boxes - the only solution to the political situation, his acceptance of the inconsequence of bloodline, royal or otherwise, and ensuring ultimate security for the one he has determined to protect. It also lends itself to free Yi Chang in more ways than one - a salve to the guilt he carries for what he did to his own father, and empowering him to protect this land and its people in his own way - covert yet unrelenting to the last.

 

The finale is a perfect resolution to the arc and its incredible journey, tying up most of the loose ends, while raising further questions of its own. As with life, there is always an element of mystery and the unknown, and the final scene is like a teaser to what lies beyond the curtain - a mystery we may never solve if a next installment does not materialise. Nonetheless, as an avid fan of this universe, I can safely say that like Signal before this, S2 ends on the right note, leaving the doors open for a new season, but still serving as a highly convincing conclusion to a spectacular series. And to think that when I first heard about its premise several years ago, I could hardly wrap my mind around the idea of a zombie outbreak in the Joseon era, and was only on board solely on the strength of KEH's participation in this project. Now, I cannot imagine a time when this universe did not exist, how vividly it has come to life in the hands of the immensely talented cast and crew, all of whom deserve a standing ovation. Well done!

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In case anyone is wondering, the untranslated words Yi Chang wrote with water in his message to Seo Bi in Ep2, were 安炫 "Ahn Hyeon". Unfortunately, the rest of what he wrote are not really legible, which perhaps could have been deliberate, so as to keep viewers wondering what Yi Chang is trying to tell her with regards to Ahn Hyeon.

Image

 

As an aside, I must applaud Yi Chang for being able to write Hanja upside down though - no mean feat! :D 

Can I also just note how in awe I am that he manages to keep his nails so beautifully maintained through all the grueling, vicious battles? Joseon manicures are no joke! :P

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@stella77 Some thoughts re points/questions you raised:

Spoiler

 

Those two zombies in the cells were originally created back in Ep5 of S1, at the 31:38min mark when Cho Hak Ju deliberately fed one of them the flesh of the infected to confirm this is the method which through which the transformation occurs. The 2nd prisoner was then attacked, died and himself transformed. I love how the scene was not just random to show how Cho Hak Ju figured out the transformation process, but rather ties in with the next season to bring about the bloodbath in the palace in the end which effectively destroyed all that he had painstakingly worked so hard to achieve.

 

From what I see, infection due to bites from type 2 zombies do not cause transformation until the victims die. If so, this would explain why our heroes survived since they were plunged into the lake, which purged their bodies of the worms while they were still alive, thus clearing them of the infection.

 

In the case of the infant, it is notable that Seo bi only submerged his hands and feet in water. Perhaps a full body submersion like Cho Hak Ju's in the tub, and Yi Chang and the rest in the lake, is necessary to ensure all the worms were removed. And since his brain was not developed yet, the remaining worms laid dormant until such time when he has matured enough for the infection to take place. Still, seeing he was bitten by type 2 zombies, does this mean he will have to die before any infection takes effect? Or the fact that they were dormant in his body for 7 years means they have mutated to now be able to survive and infect a living host? Questions questions.

 

 

 

@Sejabin I think this is a very accurate reflection of history. In a society that places so much emphasis on the legitimacy of bloodlines, particularly the royal bloodline, there is a stigma in usurping the throne except for extenuating circumstances. More often than not, the throne is bolstered by immensely powerful clans whom the king would be loathe to cross, particularly if he owes his throne to their support, and realises that they can just as easily depose him if they so wish. These clans then consolidate and cement their power even more through marriage alliances with the royal family. This is true in the history of China throughout its many dynasties as well... weak or puppet kings controlled by ruling factions.

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Soundtrack composer has also changed for season 2.

 

Season 1 was helmed by 목영진 Mok Young Jin whose works are predominantly movie soundtracks - Tunnel, The Witness, A Hard Day etc.

 

The musical director for Season 2 is 달파란 Dalpalan who composed the scores for movies including The Wailing, Assassination and Secretly, Greatly.

 

Unfortunately, still no sign of any official soundtrack for either season, though someone did kindly post the ending theme from S1:

 

and the new opening theme for S2:

 

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5 hours ago, liddi said:

Soundtrack composer has also changed for season 2.

 

Season 1 was helmed by 목영진 Mok Young Jin whose works are predominantly movie soundtracks - Tunnel, The Witness, A Hard Day etc.

 

The musical director for Season 2 is 달파란 Dalpalan who composed the scores for movies including The Wailing, Assassination and Secretly, Greatly.

 

Unfortunately, still no sign of any official soundtrack for either season, though someone did kindly post the ending theme from S1:

and the new opening theme for S2:

 

 

They should release the complete OST for S1.

 

I don't know about S2 as I haven't watched it yet, but the opening credits score is just meh?..

 

S1 was ace start to finish.

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Just stumbled across this Kim Eun Hee interview from a year ago...

 

KIM Eun-hee, screenwriter of KINGDOM

Mar 11, 2019
  • Writerby SONG Soon-jin
 
“I want to address politics through the zombies”
 
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Netflix Original Series Kingdom is now available on the VOD service. This is the first period piece, as well as the first zombie story, from screenwriter KIM Eun-hee who has made her name in genre TV series with Sign, Phantom, and Signal. The much-anticipated first season having been successfully released, KIM Eun-hee explained that the story was inspired by the Annals of King Sunjo which are part of the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty (an extended corpus of official records that were kept daily from 1413 to 1865). The premise is that people living under the oppression of the authorities with nothing but hunger are turning into zombies. KIM Eun-hee’s own vivid descriptions of real life and the social critique that comes with it shine again in Kingdom. We met her to learn more about the emergence of zombies in the Joseon Era.
 
You must have heard various reactions to Kingdom.
Netflix doesn’t disclose its viewing figures, so I have no idea when I should be happy and when I should feel ashamed. (laughs) Someone asked me, “Why are you nervous? You can determine the success of a Netflix Original series by whether or not it is getting renewed for a second season, and season 2 has already been greenlit”. For now, I’m simply thrilled just from the fact that we completed Kingdom.
 
Associating zombies to the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty is an original idea. How did you come up with it?
I like zombie stories and tried to find plenty of shows and movies, but after watching them I would often find the sight of zombies moving in flocks somewhat sadder than at first glance. They are a form of life full of hunger, living beings that only have appetite! After that, as I was reading books on the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty and the great famines, I started wondering what would happen if we incorporated zombies to the most disastrous period, when the hunger was at its worst.
 
I heard that Kingdom had long been a troubled project.
I had nothing more than this interesting idea, but when I looked at the state of the Korean TV series industry, I thought it wouldn’t be easy to actually film it. The same could have been said in the film industry. It wasn’t really until TRAIN TO BUSAN (2016) that what we call “zombie films” became possible. Before that, there was a lot of pessimistic reactions. I tried several times to tell people in the industry that I had this project, but they were lukewarm. (laughs) So I just kept dreaming alone, but one day, after the end of TV series Signal, I was contacted by Netflix asking me if I was interested in working with them. It was only then that I felt like I could make the zombie series I had dreamed.
 
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You personally brought KIM Seong-hun (films A Hard Day and Tunnel) on board to direct the first season. How was your collaboration?
It was the first period drama for both of us so I figured we could help each other. As I wanted to show a lot of unique settings in Kingdom, having good communication and being on the same wavelength was more important than having experience in period dramas. Both of us are talkative. We also know well each other’s style. Generally, once a series starts, there is almost no time to communicate with the director. This time, though, the pre-production was perfect, so I had a lot of time to discuss with the director.
 
You stressed a few times already that Kingdom is a story about hunger, but what is it you wanted to express with this motif?
The first thing I wrote on the white board of the studio when we started was, “What is called politics?”. I wanted to show more than a few aspects of politics, not only irresponsibility and corruption among the ruling powers. What I mean is, in Dongnae we can see an incompetent and irresponsible ruling class, while in Sangju we see a ruling elite that has a sense of duty. There have been great leaders comparable to Crown Prince (JU Ji-hoon) and Lord Ahn Hyeon (HUH Joon-ho) in history too. I wanted to show several of such characters in all their diversity.
 
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Whereas TRAIN TO BUSAN follows the characters from Seoul to Busan, the main characters in Kingdom travel from Dongnae, the former name of Busan region, to Hanyang, known today as Seoul.
It is the story of a Crown Prince who left home and is now going back, but he has to face extreme odds on the way. That’s why I thought it would be better to send him to the location that is the furthest in distance, and strangely enough it’s Dongnae that came to my mind at that time. Having thus decided which path the characters would take, they would naturally have to cross the Baekdu-daegan and so we could have natural landscapes. Personally, I wanted Kingdom to have all the antiqueness of Korean traditional houses, and as it became the story of a journey to Hanyang along the Nakdong River, it allowed us to show beautiful vistas.
 
How were the zombies of Kingdom conceived?
The way some foreign series depict zombies as a virus was extremely impressive, and I like reading books on diseases like Ebola or on epidemiological investigation. So even though the zombies in Kingdom are made of several kinds of hungers, the characters in the story are put in a situation where they see it as a plague. What would have happened had there been an outbreak of disease like cholera or typhoid in Joseon? This was the fundamental idea.
 
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Did you notice any difference between working on a Korean series and working on a Netflix series?
With Netflix, I was given the recommendation not to make the episodes too long. While a Korean series would have required around 45 A4 pages, for Kingdom I was told that 27-28 pages per episode would be more appropriate. At first, adjusting to this constrain was difficult because it was a strong habit. For the second season, however, I’ve got quite used to it so the writing was much easier.
 
Speaking of which, please tell us more about the plot of Season 2.
The story of the second season will start in winter, and the characters will have to deal with greater emotional hardships and events. Personally, there are more stories I would like to tell about these characters. That’s why I would like to pen a third season.
 
There are great expectations for your next project.
I’ve started working on the script for Signal 2, but it’s still in an early stage. And after that, I would like to venture into science-fiction. What I would like to do is not just writing another story set in space, but a very Korean take on SF.

 

 

 

cr. koreanfilm.or.kr

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Kingdom season 2 press conference on 5 March, 2020

The production presentation of the original Netflix series "Kingdom Season 2" was held on the morning of July 5. The scene was attended by actors Ju Ji-hoon, Ryu Seung-ryong, Bae Doo-na, Kim Sang-ho, Kim Sung-kyu, Jeon Suk-ho, Kim Hye-joon, director Kim Sung-hoon, director Park In-jae and scriptwriter Kim Eun-hee. The event was broadcast live online to prevent the spread of Corona19.(Video courtesy = Netflix 'Kingdom')

 

 

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I really anticipated the season 2. Wait from last year. However the night of the release in Netflix, i watched at midnight.... I was shocked with the zombies and everything. It creeps me up watching late at nite, alone. So, i just I go through with a speed of light to all of the episodes. I'll wait when I have courage to go through all of them in full. 

What a scaredy cat of me :lol::sweatingbullets:

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On 3/18/2020 at 12:36 AM, liddi said:

In case anyone is wondering, the untranslated words Yi Chang wrote with water in his message to Seo Bi in Ep2, were 安炫 "Ahn Hyeon". Unfortunately, the rest of what he wrote are not really legible, which perhaps could have been deliberate, so as to keep viewers wondering what Yi Chang is trying to tell her with regards to Ahn Hyeon.

 

I think obviously, he means to bring 安炫 "Ahn Hyeon" back to life.

Edited by Jillia
Please do not quote pics! Thanks!
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@tenor889 Thank you for sharing the actual footage of the press conference. It is times like these that I wish I could understand the language. Guess the best I can hope for is that someone will sub it one day. 

 

What I meant to say about the writing in water is that it is probably deliberate on the part of production to not show the rest of the words that were written apart from 安炫. So even if there are viewers who could read Hanja, the plot is not immediately revealed ahead of time, thus making the impact of Ahn Hyeon's reemergence later that much more powerful. Of course it meant nothing to those who could not read Hanja in the first place, and I remember watching several reaction videos where people were asking "What did he write?  Why didn't they translate it?", hence the reason for my post in the first place.

 

The performances are all spot on across the board, veteran and younger actors alike, including the child actors, and sweeps me along with them through their individual journeys. Is there any indication how S2 is received domestically? Has the dissatisfaction towards BDN's diction and KHJ's acting changed this season? I cannot speak for BDN's diction but I love her understated portrayal of Seo Bi's level-headedness in the midst of the turmoil, and her desperation as she protects the infant, first from the hoard, then from the prince. I remember amidst the criticism leveled at KHJ's portrayal of the young Queen last season, RSR specifically asked people to wait and see her performance in S2. Sure enough, she absolutely nailed the terrifying, quiet menace of a queen whose cold, calculating plans outstrip even her own father's, and no one is safe from her, not even her own father who himself instills so much dread to those around him. Bravo to all. 

 

My woeful lack of understanding for the language notwithstanding, these videos give me so much joy just watching them (subs please??) Had a good laugh in particular at their artistic impressions of each other - RSR's drawing of Seo-Bi is hilarious!

 

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A very interesting perspective of S2 from the lens of a Korean viewer, who is able to identify the nuances that may be lost on non-Korean viewers like myself:

 

 

S2 cast with a challenge to answer questions pertaining to S1 correctly - those with wrong answers get attacked by zombies :D I love how RSR snarls back at the zombie at the 2:26min mark :lol:

 

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More news about a potential S3! 

 

 

cr. BillyRocks_13 twitter translation of Naver article

 

 

And some regarding Beom Pal and Seo Bi's potential interaction and relationship. KEH thinks it is questionable whether Seo Bi can accept his feelings as she has a lot of work to do. I remember BDN herself said in an interview, having Beom Pal forever hiding behind her character is exhausting :D :

cr. BillyRocks_13 twitter translation of Daum article

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Looks like S3 will be centered around the origins of the plague with resentment as a theme, which I guess is the reason the plague was deliberately spread to Joseon in the first place:

 

Screenwriter Kim Eun Hee Talks About The Potential For Jun Ji Hyun’s Lead Role In “Kingdom” Season 3

Screenwriter Kim Eun Hee Talks About The Potential For Jun Ji Hyun’s Lead Role In “Kingdom” Season 3

Mar 21, 2020
by S. Cho
 

The screenwriter of “Kingdom” has dropped some hints regarding a potential third season!

On March 20, Kim Eun Hee, the screenwriter of “Kingdom,” took part in an interview about the show’s second season. Season two of this mystery thriller is a zombie sageuk taking place in the Joseon dynasty, where crown prince Lee Chang (Joo Ji Hoon) must help his people amidst the growing greed of his own family over the throne.

This season is especially garnering attention for its similarities to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Kim Eun Hee shared, “‘Kingdom’ is a project that has been in the works since 2011. I based the origin of the plague spreading from Sangju in North Gyeongsang Province off of the Baekdudaegan mountain range, because when you look at a map of Korea, it naturally creates a divide.”

She continued, “During this pandemic, there is no one who is taking it lightly. I hope this will quickly calm down. Although ‘Kingdom’ is open to interpretation, I hope by spring that this nightmare will be over and we will all be able to return to where we belong.”

Following the release of season two, “Kingdom” scored an average rating of 8.9 on the film database site IMDB, ranking higher than Academy Award winning film “Parasite” at 8.6 and season one of “Kingdom” at 8.3.

Kim Eun Hee also discussed the potential for a third season. She explained, “While working on season two, I wanted to portray a much larger universe. Those who have watched will know, but people like Lee Chang, Seo Bi, and Young Shin are all people who chase the plague, wishing it never arose. I’ve thought that having season three tell the story of chasing the origin of the plague would be good, so we’re thinking of doing that.”

She added, “Season one told the story of hunger and season two told the story of blood. If Netflix agrees, I want season three to tell the story of resentment. Season two brought attention to the concept of ‘temperature’ and I think if the story were to travel north, the different ecosystem in the North would act as a hint.”

Jun Ji Hyun, who appeared at the end of season two, is also a large possibility for season three. Kim Eun Hee explained, “I think Jun Ji Hyun will become a central role alongside the main characters from season one and two.”

The screenwriter concluded by saying, “I think we’ll have to have a good discussion with Netflix for season three. Since all our actors are good people, we will have to match well with their schedules. Since this is a series that I’ve wanted to do for so long, quickly creating season three is a personal wish of mine. I will work hard.”

 

 

cr. Soompi

 

 

 

JJH brings up a good point too about why he prefers Yi Chang's fate in S2, which in turn allows him to continue with the series. Love how emotional JJH is over S2, and the close friendships formed over the course of the two years of filming. 

 

 

Joo Ji Hoon Shares Opinion On His “Kingdom” Character’s Fate, Concerns About COVID-19, And More

Mar 21, 2020
by S. Cho
 

Joo Ji Hoon recently sat down to chat about his hit drama “Kingdom”!

In zombie sageuk “Kingdom,” Joo Ji Hoon plays crown prince Lee Chang, who stops at nothing to protect his citizens from the plague, even if it means going against his own family.

Season two of the series, which dropped on March 13, is already accumulating numerous positive reviews. Joo Ji Hoon commented, “Movies count moviegoers and dramas have viewership ratings, but it’s fun to look for the responses to ‘Kingdom’ firsthand. I’m currently looking at reviews through social media and I feel happy and thankful that viewers seem to be enjoying it.” He added, “I do my best regardless of what project I’m filming, but what would make an actor happier than hearing positive feedback?”

Joo-Ji-Hoon-1.jpg

The global response to Lee Chang’s fate has seen quite the divide, but Joo Ji Hoon shared, “I like the ending as it is. If I didn’t make that choice, I think I would’ve had to leave the series. I didn’t want to do that.”

He also revealed that he read the script for season two on the plane to a conference in Singapore. While sitting beside and reading with co-star Ryu Seung Ryong, he shared that they both kept exclaiming, “Huh? What do we do next?” adding, “We were constantly shocked while reading.”

Joo Ji Hoon also spoke about the relationship he has with his other co-stars, including Bae Doona and Kim Sung Kyu. He commented, “If you combine it all, we’ve spent over two years together and we’ve consistently maintained positive relationships, frequently meeting up.”

The-Kingdown-S2-Review-10.jpg

He continued, “When season one ended, season two was not confirmed, but we were all looking forward to it as if it was. Recently, I watched all of season two by myself and I was so overwhelmed by emotions. I was so caught up in my late-night emotions that I texted all the actors. I regretted it the day after but I had told them that I was thankful. Although I don’t consider season two to be the end, it felt like our long two years together had concluded and I felt a void. It was a fascinating feeling.”

Regarding Jun Ji Hyun, who made a cameo appearance in the finale of season two, Joo Ji Hoon shared, “I’ve been a fan of Jun Ji Hyun since I was young.” He also explained that he heard the news of her appearance late, saying, “I heard of her addition way later. After hearing it, I said, ‘Jun Ji Hyun is making a cameo?’ I was so shocked. I was so excited to work with her but I wasn’t even able to meet her on set. I didn’t even get to hear her voice.”

“Kingdom” has also garnered a lot of attention for its similarities to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Joo Ji Hoon shared his concerns regarding the virus, saying, “It’s quite ironic. We completed this project in August of last year, but it really hurts my heart that this story sees parallels with our world, because this is our reality and not a drama.”

Spoiler

Joo-Ji-Hoon-3.jpg

The actor continued, “My parents and family members are currently struggling to find masks. As an actor, I have my own car to ride, but most citizens have no choice but to take the bus or subway even when we should not be in packed areas. Situations like this are so regrettable. Since we’re adults, we can put up with it, but how can children contain their energy, especially when the weather is getting nicer? Looking at families around me with young children makes me wish that much more for this situation to settle down, so I’ve been praying every day.”

Regarding the potential for “Kingdom” season three, he shared, “I’m looking forward to it too. Although nothing has been confirmed yet, the entire cast including myself have expectations for a third season. From what I’ve heard, it’s going to be an even larger spectacle. Since season two had a lot of physical action, I hope season three has a lot of strategical action.” He added, “I wonder if I’ll be able to meet Jun Ji Hyun for season three. Since nothing’s been confirmed, our viewers need to encourage it so Netflix begins to take action. Please encourage it lots.”

 

 

cr. Soompi

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On 3/15/2020 at 8:05 PM, kboramint said:

Wait... if the worms/virus still exist in the young King, then do the worms/virus still exist in the people that survived the ice lake. Weren't they all bitten? Including the Prince.  

 

Also, on a different topic... was that Kim Hye-Jun as Zombie Queen?

 

I don't think they still exist in the people who fell in the water because they escaped out. However, there must be a reason they didn't attack the baby. It will be interesting to see how the baby and the worms "merge"/co-exist as one. Will the king become a flesh eater? So many unknowns.  

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*SPOILER ALERT*

There better be a third season. I binge watched the second season today and while I know that zombie stories never have full closures, I could have lived with LC leaving the throne/palace and the kid becoming King.

 

But then the plot thickens in the finale's last minutes with one worm still living inside the King, the appearance of JJH as supposedly the story's final villain as well as the suspicious looking eunuch (is it Ahn Jae Hong?)... 

 

They just can't leave us hanging like this.

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  • Guest changed the title to [Upcoming Drama 2019-2021] Kingdom, 킹덤 - Joo Ji Hoon, Bae Doo Na - Netflix - One-Episode-Special to premiere in 2021

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