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[Drama 2019] Different Dreams, 이몽

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20 hours ago, MidnightRain said:

Young Jin seems to have an awkward relationship with her adoptive father, their scenes together have this very unsettling, tense feeling. :unsure:

 

It does feel tense, especially in the car and when Young Jin talking about leaving to Shanghai.  He seems strict.  I think the Hina Doll is a metaphor that she can't mess up anything that could affect him.

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1 hour ago, QSD said:

 

It does feel tense, especially in the car and when Young Jin talking about leaving to Shanghai.  He seems strict.  I think the Hana Doll is a metaphor that she can't mess up anything that could affect him.

Agree, there some tense between them but despite what QSD says i rather felt, YJ relationship is a kind of healer with a patience,i guess the Japanese man loss her own daughter in tragic accidents but somehow they saved by Joseon native/or someone has relationship with YJ.

As high officials military he should strict in values and discipline however he brought korean values to rise YJ it's means he don't want YJ forgotten to her roots, in other words YJ adoptive fathers have empathy towards Joseon and the independent movement.and respect or even he himself nurture the patriotic practice in YJ up bringing.

(somehow i'm not surprised YJ is the real bluebird)

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I haven't yet the chance to watch the eps but I'm really in this just for the FuJin ship.  I don't feel too warm and fuzzy about the main guy nor the subject matter.  I know my ship is already in dangerous water and I need some kind of miracle for it to sail.  Can someone clue me in as to what was said during the confession?

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@Shinobu

 

Young Jin leaving to Shanghai so Fukuda says he will wait for her return after things settle down.  She was astonished by what he said.  He acknowledges they have barely met.  I must seem foolish, he says.  She then starts laughing saying but you’re so… and walking away.  So he stops her and asking what is it?  She asks him you’ve never confessed to a woman, have you?  Does it show, he asks.  She replies, "A lot." 

 

You should watch it, Shinobu.  It’s so cute and beautifully shot of their easy going.  The scene is in the second hour at 39:10 mark.  Or you can watch this one without subs.

 

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Humans are mysterious creatures. 

After the deaths of the sorcerers, humans can’t see properly. 

Furthermore...they don’t even suspect...they can’t see.

 

Has anyone thought about these monologues at the end?  Somehow I feel she’s implying even KWB didn’t suspect her is a spy.  Perhaps coz of what he said to her in the end on that ship in the clip below, “I’ve no need to see a woman like you.”

 

 

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Do you think YJ will make use of or try to get close to Fukuda on purpose of her spy duty?

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4 hours ago, 12blbl said:

Do you think YJ will make use of or try to get close to Fukuda on purpose of her spy duty?

 

Perhaps not intentionally.  That's a big dilemma.  One thing she needs the intel, but not hurting him in the process is how she could possibly avoid it.  It's really intriguing to see.

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15 hours ago, 12blbl said:

Do you think YJ will make use of or try to get close to Fukuda on purpose of her spy duty?

 

I think she'll use him too, she probably doesn't want to but she's shouldering a lot of responsibilities so it's beyond what she feels and more of what she has to do in order to achieve her goals.

 

~

I like Fukuda, he seems like a decent man, I'm hoping he doesn't go raving mad like Gaksital's Shunji because yikes. Although it'd be interesting to see Im Joo-Hwan in such a role because he has such a gentle image and I can't imagine him going full out villainous. 

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YJ is now registered as a Japanese citizen.  I wonder if she will ever change it back to her origin. 

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May 7, 2019

 

Spy thriller tells story of independence fighters 

 

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Scenes from MBC drama "Different Dreams" / Courtesy of MBC

 

By Park Jin-hai The Korea Times

 

MBC's new blockbuster period spy thriller "Different Dreams," focused on the life of legendary independence fighter Kim Won-bong, kicked off on Saturday. 

 

The 20 billion won-budget spy action series is designed to commemorate the centennial of the March 1 Independence Movement and establishment of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea in Shanghai. The drama revolves around Kim, who organized a group of Korean independence fighters, called Uiyeoldan, at the age of 22 and led an armed resistance against the Japanese imperialists. 

 

The drama, starring Yoo Ji-tae as Kim Won-bong and Lee Yo-won as Lee Young-jin, debuted receiving fairly good ratings of over 7 percent. The first four episodes, each 30-minutes long, aired Saturday and the drama's fast-paced plot successfully encompassed various walks of life in the history of independence movement under Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945). 

 

The young, militant, patriotic members of Uiyeoldan, led by Kim Won-bong, in a secret meeting recite the Declaration of Joseon Revolution, written by Sin Chae-ho in 1923, and swear to sacrifice themselves for the independence of the country. 

 

Meanwhile, Park Hyuk (played by Heo Ji-won), a long-time Uiyeoldan member, turns his back and tries to buy his future in Japan by passing critical information about a Korean spy to the Japanese police. Faced with Kim, who came to kill the betrayer, Park asks back, "Do we have a nation? What has the country given to me? It only gave me starvation and oppression. The King brought in foreign armies to kill its own people, while high ranking officials only care about fattening their own pockets. What kind of a nation is this?" he retorts. 

 

Kim Nam-ok (Cho Bok-rae), another Uiyeoldan member on his mission to kill his former comrade and betrayer Park, hesitates and fails to kill his target.

 

The drama also featured freedom fighters with different ideologies and values but the same goal of achieving independence. The female lead character Lee Young-jin, played by actress Lee, is a Korean who was adopted by a Japanese couple and grew up to be a doctor. She later turned out to be a spy for the Provisional Government, working under the code name of "Blue Bird." 

 

On a ferry heading to Shanghai, Lee meets Kim Won-bong. Regarding the death of her close friend and fellow doctor Esther Park, who gets shot after her failed attempt to inject poison into the Japanese officer responsible for killing her entire village including her parents, Kim Won-bong says, "What she has done, whether it was personal revenge or by order of the Provisional Government, was the right decision."

 

But Lee retorted, "Is 'blood for blood' right?" 

 

The key points of the upcoming episodes will be how Kim and Lee, both with different visions, can cooperate in Shanghai and work towards independence. Also anticipated are more adrenaline-pumping action scenes in the spy period drama. 

 

The drama's first episode ended, showing black-and-white photos of the real patriotic figures who inspired the TV series, including Esther Park, the first female Korean physician and independence fighter; Ji Cheong-cheon, superintendent of the Sinheung Military Academy where new leaders of the Korean forces were being trained; and Ji's second daughter and freedom fighter Ji Bok-young.

 

No one denies Kim Won-bong's selfless and relentless fight for national independence before liberation in 1945. Along with Uiyeoldan, he also organized the Korean Volunteers Army in 1938 and later served as the deputy commander of the Korean Liberation Army. 

 

However Kim Won-bong's patriotic deeds have mostly been ignored, because he went to the North in 1948 and is alleged to have become a statesman who contributed to establishment of the regime there. But Kim Il-sung purged him in 1958.

 

Viewers left mixed comments like "Seeing the ending photos, I wanted to get to know more about those real-life patriotic figures, in particular Esther Park," and "Now we have the right drama to show Kim Won-bong's life and explain what forced him to go to the North," while conservative viewers said "Don't beautify the communist."


jinhai@koreatimes.co.kr 

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May 8, 2019

 

HanCinema's News

"Different Dreams" Comes Under Scrutiny
 

By William Schwartz HanCinema.net

 

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With a huge budget of 200 billion won (~17 million US dollars) expectations have been high for "Different Dreams". But a lot of the reaction to the drama has been muted. With a first weekend of ratings hovering in the range of 5-7%, the drama's long term viability is an open question.


One major issue in Korean discussions has been Yoo Ji-tae's portrayal of Korean freedom fighter Kim Won-bong. The main point of criticism is that Yoo Ji-tae is making Kim Won-bong seem too pretty and glamorous. Kim Won-bong was known for getting his hands dirty, yet the drama's core concept is romantic in execution.

 

The use of a real-life freedom fighter is also problematic. The real world Kim Won-bong eventually joined the North Korean government when the peninsula was partitioned. While this has no bearing on the plot of "Different Dreams", which takes place long before the partition took place, the potential political problems of such a portrayal are obvious.

 

Not that "Different Dreams" is the first time Kim Won-bong has appeared on film. Cho Seung-woo briefly played Kim Won-bong in a cameo appearance in "The Assassination"- but as a cameo appearance, it was not necessary for the action-oriented movie to go into detail about his motivation.

 

The degree to which this really matters to "Different Dreams" either critically or commercially is at this point ambiguous. At a press conference for "Different Dreams" that was held on May 2nd Yoo Ji-tae stated that he was portraying Kim Won-bong symbolically rather than literally. This kind of attitude is normal for historical adaptations.

 

Written by William Schwartz

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FuJin is in Shanghai.  Cheers shippers.

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On 5/8/2019 at 1:35 AM, MidnightRain said:

I like Fukuda, he seems like a decent man, I'm hoping he doesn't go raving mad like Gaksital's Shunji because yikes. Although it'd be interesting to see Im Joo-Hwan in such a role because he has such a gentle image and I can't imagine him going full out villainous. 

It is possible that he too can become a Shunji if it involves the loss of pride in losing to the conquered country and losing the woman he loves. It would be good to see how Im Joo Hwan will interpret the character of Fukuda although in this beginning episodes Fukuda does seem to be a gentle man. However, in Gaksital, Shunji also seemed like a good and decent guy who turned villain. Here though, Fukuda character is older than the Shunji character in Gaksital so maybe Fukuda will be less volatile. 

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