Quantcast
Jump to content
Go Seung Ji

[Drama 2018] My Mister, 나의 아저씨 - Best Drama at 2019 (55th) BaekSang Arts Awards

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, sadiesmith said:

 

@chickfactor, thank you so much for even attempting to partially translate that long article. I am quoting your whole post because some people might have missed this at the top of the page. While the piece as a whole gave me a whiplash, she completely saw through the veiled attempt at non-romance.   LOL at these parts:

 

First, it was clearly the objective (of the drama) to show a romantic relationship between an adult man and a young woman. There are many pitiful factors in the drama, but Dong-Hoon treats only Ji-An with too much deep empathy and his behavior (towards her) is excessive. The drama subverted these “suspicions” in sophisticated ways and provided meaningful pretext.

 

Looking down at Ji-an’s feet in short socks that exposed her ankles and wearing worn-out sneakers Dong-Hoon said, “Why do you wear such short socks in winter? Do you think it’s sexy?” He goes to a bar in which he had a drink with her before, looks around and asks the owner, “Did you see that girl who came with me before, by chance? That pretty girl…” The drama’s PD insisted that he wanted to depict human love rather than man-woman love, but he insisted on referencing “sexiness” and “pretty,” thereby not letting the viewer’s expectations for romance die. He is a skilled hunter who killed two rabbits with one stone: high ratings and silence the critics.

 

Thanks for the article and translation. :) The author is right that PDnim denied the romantic angle although he definitely kept it there. He can be faulted for that. But it cant be denied that PD nim did create a human story and it is his call if he wants it labelled as such. 

 

What's off with the article is how it seems written out of context of the entire drama. Of course patriarchy in modern times is something to be scorned at (e.g., look at office ajhussis in Pretty Noona who you'd like to punch and pummel to death if they come anywhere near you). But if you take into context how the characters are in MA, would you really look at the ajhussis (including DH) and want to raise hell if they look your way? In fact, despite their seeming sexist bantering you know they dont mean harm and they take care of the women. That was how their characters are developed IN THIS drama. At no instance in this drama did I feel icky about any of the dialogues which others might construe as sexist or how much the characters helped each other which author finds excessive. What I got from this drama is something positive. Call it patriarchy or something else (I prefer to call it humanity), but in this drama's context, it was something positive. :) and actually, compared to other recent dramas, the women in MA are strong. Even JA who is physically overpowered many times is mentally strong because she fights. Even the actress and JH, they cry a lot and suffer a lot but strength emanates from how they fight for their love. Women are not diminished in this drama. Maybe in other dramas. Not this one.

  • Like 14
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KPOP HERALD

 

Music

Heartwarming series 'My Mister' tops weekly TV chart

 
Updated : May 29 2018

 

image



"My Mister," a television series about an unlikely friendship between a 20-something woman and her senior colleague in his 40s, has topped the weekly TV chart, data showed Tuesday.

Starring singer-actor Lee Ji-eun, better known by her stage name IU, and Lee Sun-kyun, the heartwarming drama on tvN wrapped up on May 17 with its highest ratings and to audience applause.

Its final episode garnered a score of 249.5 on the weekly Content Power Index (CPI) for May 14-20.

When the 16-episode drama started in March, there were voices critical of what was presumed to be a romance between a young woman and a married man. After all, the singer-songwriter had been embroiled in a controversy of using the Lolita complex for her 2015 EP "Chat-shire."

But the concern turned out to be groundless as the drama unfolded.

Lee Ji-an, played by Lee, has supported her sick grandmother on her own since she was six. She does whatever it takes to make money to repay her debt to Lee Kwang-il, the son of the cruel moneylender she accidentally killed when she was a middle schooler.

In her desperate attempt to escape from the deepening cycle of debt, she approaches Park Dong-hoon, played by Lee, a warm-hearted middle manager at the company she temps at. In spite of herself, she begins to feel sympathy for Park, who suffers the heavy weight of life in his own way.

Besides the main characters, there were not a few relatable, realistic supporting characters who all have a boy-next-door charm, as well as down-to-earth and self-deprecating humor.

Among them are Park's two helpless brothers, who do cleaning services and consider themselves failures -- for now -- but never give up on life. The three brothers, in a way, reflect the ordinary life of the country's middle-aged men or ajeossi in Korean, drawing audience support.

The oldest brother Park Sang-hun says, "How interesting it is that Korea went through so many different things for 50 years, but how I've achieved nothing for half a century."

"It is about someone becoming special to someone else," producer Kim Won-suk, also known for such hit series as "Misaeng" and "Signal," said at a press event in Seoul last month.

"This one is in line with my previous works, in that it also tells about life together and that life changes for the better, if only slightly, by meeting and interacting with others."

The CPI, created by CJ E&M and Nielsen Korea, measures the level of popularity, social media trending and influence on consumer behavior of entertainment TV programs aired on three major terrestrial networks -- MBC, SBS and KBS -- and seven cable channels owned by CJ E&M, including tvN, Mnet and OCN, during prime time. JTBC, another cable network that airs some highly popular entertainment shows and dramas, was not included in the survey. (Yonhap)

 

http://kpopherald.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=201805291338471301961_2

 

Heartwarming series 'My Mister' tops weekly TV chart

2018/05/29

Spoiler

 

By Woo Jae-yeon

SEOUL, May 29 (Yonhap) -- "My Mister," a television series about an unlikely friendship between a 20-something woman and her senior colleague in his 40s, has topped the weekly TV chart, data showed Tuesday.

Starring singer-actor Lee Ji-eun, better known by her stage name IU, and Lee Sun-kyun, the heartwarming drama on tvN wrapped up on May 17 with its highest ratings and to audience applause.

Its final episode garnered a score of 249.5 on the weekly Content Power Index (CPI) for May 14-20.

When the 16-episode drama started in March, there were voices critical of what was presumed to be a romance between a young woman and a married man. After all, the singer-songwriter had been embroiled in a controversy of using the Lolita complex for her 2015 EP "Chat-shire."

   But the concern turned out to be groundless as the drama unfolded.

A poster for "My Mister," provided by tvN (Yonhap)A poster for "My Mister," provided by tvN (Yonhap)

Lee Ji-an, played by Lee, has supported her sick grandmother on her own since she was six. She does whatever it takes to make money to repay her debt to Lee Kwang-il, the son of the cruel moneylender she accidentally killed when she was a middle schooler.

In her desperate attempt to escape from the deepening cycle of debt, she approaches Park Dong-hoon, played by Lee, a warm-hearted middle manager at the company she temps at. In spite of herself, she begins to feel sympathy for Park, who suffers the heavy weight of life in his own way.

Besides the main characters, there were not a few relatable, realistic supporting characters who all have a boy-next-door charm, as well as down-to-earth and self-deprecating humor.

Among them are Park's two helpless brothers, who do cleaning services and consider themselves failures -- for now -- but never give up on life. The three brothers, in a way, reflect the ordinary life of the country's middle-aged men or ajeossi in Korean, drawing audience support.

The oldest brother Park Sang-hun says, "How interesting it is that Korea went through so many different things for 50 years, but how I've achieved nothing for half a century."

  

Four cast members of tvN's "My Mister" pose for photos before a press event in Seoul on April 11, 2018. (Yonhap)Four cast members of tvN's "My Mister" pose for photos before a press event in Seoul on April 11, 2018. (Yonhap)

"It is about someone becoming special to someone else," producer Kim Won-suk, also known for such hit series as "Misaeng" and "Signal," said at a press event in Seoul last month.

"This one is in line with my previous works, in that it also tells about life together and that life changes for the better, if only slightly, by meeting and interacting with others."

   The CPI, created by CJ E&M and Nielsen Korea, measures the level of popularity, social media trending and influence on consumer behavior of entertainment TV programs aired on three major terrestrial networks -- MBC, SBS and KBS -- and seven cable channels owned by CJ E&M, including tvN, Mnet and OCN, during prime time. JTBC, another cable network that airs some highly popular entertainment shows and dramas, was not included in the survey.

 

This photo provided by tvN shows two posters for "My Mister." (Yonhap)This photo provided by tvN shows two posters for "My Mister." (Yonhap)

jaeyeon.woo@yna.co.kr

(END)

 

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/kwave/2018/05/29/3001000000AEN20180529002300315.html

 

 

 

 

 
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone,I’ve been silently lurking here but decided to post something regarding the criticisms of the article.

1. About the romance: they are consenting adults, period.

2. The whole tribalism vs individualism aspect: The author raises valid points but fails to see that the drama does not see the community as always positive( the family/ society who expect DH to be successful by becoming a director, SH pressuring him to keep his job no matter what and stay in his failed marriage, the failure of the marriage itself), all that has made him depressed and downright suicidal.

moreover at the end of the story, many characters are more independent than before: DH starts his own company and separates/ divorces( I wish the PD made it clearer...), SH leaves his mother’s home and KH tries again for his dream of being a director.

To me the story is about balance between individual desires and living in a society, DH starts the story totally consumed by society’s dictates and learns to prioritize himself and JA starts totally cut off from society and learns to form relationships and intergrade.

  • Like 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so a few thoughts.

 

Does everyone still have Ahjussi Fever? I do.

 

I don’t know how to quit this show. I suppose that I will eventually, but until another drama fills this Ahjussi-shaped void in my heart, I’ll just keep thinking about it.

 

I translated an article on page 226:

 

 

 

I don't really agree with the general premise of the article, but I thought it raised some interesting points. I had been typing a post about my afterthoughts of the drama, but hadn't yet posted it because I wasn't quite finished with what I wanted to say. But to build on some of the article's points, I thought I would just go ahead and post my half-baked thoughts:

 

--

 

Evaluating the show as a whole, I will have to conclude that the marriage definitely ended.

 

The factors:

 

1. Ji-Seok

 

They have a young son together who is shown in photos but never mentioned, to the point that the viewers wonder if he is dead. Information about him is revealed in tiny bits until the viewer eventually pieces together that he was sent to study abroad, and also that he has been there for a while.

 

This is a bit surprising, because these study abroad arrangements, while highly coveted opportunities, also don’t last *that* long, I think? Maybe a couple of years. This is mostly because it is so expensive, and also because it usually requires one parent (usually the mother) to go live abroad with the child if he is so young, leaving the father alone with the burden of financing two households and the child’s education. For many families, it’s just not sustainable for a long period of time.

 

Ji-Seok was apparently sent to the U.S. when he was quite young, and apparently plans to stay until he enters/graduates college. This isn’t really study abroad, it’s more like emigration.

 

Anyway, without dwelling on logistics, the point is that the writer chose to place Ji-Seok out of the story for a very long period of time.

 

2. Yoon-Hee

 

The second element is about Yoon-Hee’s affair with Joon-Young. After having seen the entire show now, it’s notable how much singular contempt Dong-Hoon had for Joon-Young. He’s not someone who randomly hates people, and it’s not common for him to feel that vehemently about anyone. But he really, really hated Joon-Young. And even more notably, he expresses that hatred most specifically to Yoon-Hee.

 

When Yoon-Hee mentions that she called Joon-Young, he said, “Don’t talk to him. He has greed coming out of his eyes.” It’s a really severe statement, and he does not talk about anyone else this way. Even when Ji-An (or Park Dong-Woon) asks him about it, he makes it clear that he really dislikes Joon-Young, but doesn’t elaborate why.

 

Anyway, this information shows that (1) Yoon-Hee knows well what Dong-Hoon’s opinion of Joon-Young is, and (2) chose to have an affair with Joon-Young. Not just a one-night-stand, but a pretty committed and deep affair.

 

Let’s also not forget that Joon-Young is Dong-Hoon’s boss at work.

 

The last thing worth mentioning is what we know about Yoon-Hee’s character. While she is unhappy in her marriage, she doesn’t seem like some lonely wife who got carried away by someone who wooed her. She seems very smart and deliberate about her life, someone who considers the consequences of her actions. So we can conclude that this wasn’t some impulsive affair for her.

 

The other thing we learned about Yoon-Hee is also that she is very observant about people’s characters. When she broke up with Joon-Young, she clearly knew enough about his personality and his insecurities to verbally shank him, to really hit him where it hurts. She knows how to evaluate people pretty accurately, and she knows Dong-Hoon well. So there is no way we can conclude that she didn’t understand what she was doing.

 

Dong-Hoon exposited this himself: “When you had an affair with that guy, you passed a death sentence on me.” She knew what would hurt Dong-Hoon the most. She did to him what she did to Joon-Young when they broke up - she purposefully did the most devastating thing she could to both of them.

 

Anyway, my conclusion is that the writer and PD chose to include these elements in the story to show the decks are *stacked* against this marriage surviving:

 

- A child who effectively does not exist in the show’s world, or at least plays no factor in any of Dong-Hoon or Yoon-Hee’s decisions. Ji-Seok never becomes more than a plot device to lay the groundwork for Yoon-Hee’s leaving Korea.

- A wife who has mentally exited the marriage a while ago. By choosing to have an affair with someone who has such an unusually hostile relationship with her husband, and also had the power to professionally damage him - she made a choice to leave her husband behind.

 

So these elements were put in the story for a reason, and pretty clearly spelled out. Dong-Hoon is married with a child, but the show went out of its way to essentially neutralize them as factors in his life, at least in terms of whether he can have a relationship with another woman.


3. Ji-An

 

They really upped the ante when it came to creating her character.

 

She’s not just a penniless orphan, she is drowning in debt, and routinely physically tortured by her debtor. Not only does she have to take care of her grandmother alone, the grandmother is also disabled. She cannot afford socks. She literally has to eat trash. She’s so exhausted that she falls asleep sitting up. After one of her beatings, she faints at work the next day. She walks around with bruises on her face and broken fingers.

 

On paper, she is almost baroquely pitiful, on level with the Little Match Girl or Oliver Twist. She is so pitiful that Dong-Hoon describes her as “the most pitiful child in the world.” After he hears her full story, tears stream down his face. The PD himself can’t stop himself from crying while talking about her character in a press conference.

 

So on paper, Ji-An is almost too pitiful. But on screen, she is ridiculously smart and resourceful, and so dignified and cool that she is practically regal. She is so strong that her terrible circumstances never make her seem pathetic. It will take a superhero to break down that wall she’s built around her. And the superhero arrives just in time.

 

The writer really went out of her way to create Ji-An to be a character who was in very desperate circumstances, making almost anything she does seem understandable, and when Dong-Hoon reaches out to her, it will seem heartwarming and not weird.

 

--

 

Anyway, the conclusion of what I was trying to say is that I feel like the entire story structure was designed in order to have DH and JA fall in love and end up together.

 

The Inchon Business article that I translated essentially affirms that, but ultimately has a problem with it because they feel that it served the patriarchal point of view and reinforces some old-fashioned ideal of sacrifice... and okay, um, I guess I didn't perceive any of that? I just enjoyed this drama as a story. And it's a little frustrating if people expect a drama to, like, try change society, or complain when it doesn't have the social message that they want. Sometimes people just want to tell a story. Like, this drama is not saying all 45-year-old ahjussis need to go find themselves some 20-year-old young girl to fall in love with. Because? People who want to do that are already doing that. And people who are not interested in that are not changing their minds because they watched this drama.

 

I think this drama did have a social message. It was like, I don't know, be kind to each other? I really felt that message was very strongly conveyed. No? Was it to serve my husband like a master serves a slave in the good old Joseon days? Did I miss that message?

 

I don't know, I guess what I have to say is just - to enjoy a drama as a story. Don't try to ascribe some social significance to everything. Sometimes people just want to tell a story, and sometimes that story is good.

 

And this is a love story. The end.

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sadiesmith said:

Simply amazing. Mydramalist score is currently at 9.3 and I believe it's sitting at number one spot. Which three Korean dramas sit higher on the Chinese site?

@sadiesmith

 

SS credit Ira @ira_uaenastar

4XBYezo.jpg

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, mylovelystar said:

KPOP HERALD

 

Music

Heartwarming series 'My Mister' tops weekly TV chart

 
Updated : May 29 2018



"My Mister," a television series about an unlikely friendship between a 20-something woman and her senior colleague in his 40s, has topped the weekly TV chart, data showed Tuesday.

Starring singer-actor Lee Ji-eun, better known by her stage name IU, and Lee Sun-kyun, the heartwarming drama on tvN wrapped up on May 17 with its highest ratings and to audience applause.

Its final episode garnered a score of 249.5 on the weekly Content Power Index (CPI) for May 14-20.

When the 16-episode drama started in March, there were voices critical of what was presumed to be a romance between a young woman and a married man. After all, the singer-songwriter had been embroiled in a controversy of using the Lolita complex for her 2015 EP "Chat-shire."

But the concern turned out to be groundless as the drama unfolded.

Lee Ji-an, played by Lee, has supported her sick grandmother on her own since she was six. She does whatever it takes to make money to repay her debt to Lee Kwang-il, the son of the cruel moneylender she accidentally killed when she was a middle schooler.

In her desperate attempt to escape from the deepening cycle of debt, she approaches Park Dong-hoon, played by Lee, a warm-hearted middle manager at the company she temps at. In spite of herself, she begins to feel sympathy for Park, who suffers the heavy weight of life in his own way.

Besides the main characters, there were not a few relatable, realistic supporting characters who all have a boy-next-door charm, as well as down-to-earth and self-deprecating humor.

Among them are Park's two helpless brothers, who do cleaning services and consider themselves failures -- for now -- but never give up on life. The three brothers, in a way, reflect the ordinary life of the country's middle-aged men or ajeossi in Korean, drawing audience support.

The oldest brother Park Sang-hun says, "How interesting it is that Korea went through so many different things for 50 years, but how I've achieved nothing for half a century."

"It is about someone becoming special to someone else," producer Kim Won-suk, also known for such hit series as "Misaeng" and "Signal," said at a press event in Seoul last month.

"This one is in line with my previous works, in that it also tells about life together and that life changes for the better, if only slightly, by meeting and interacting with others."

The CPI, created by CJ E&M and Nielsen Korea, measures the level of popularity, social media trending and influence on consumer behavior of entertainment TV programs aired on three major terrestrial networks -- MBC, SBS and KBS -- and seven cable channels owned by CJ E&M, including tvN, Mnet and OCN, during prime time. JTBC, another cable network that airs some highly popular entertainment shows and dramas, was not included in the survey. (Yonhap)

 

http://kpopherald.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=201805291338471301961_2

 

Heartwarming series 'My Mister' tops weekly TV chart

2018/05/29

  Hide contents

 

By Woo Jae-yeon

SEOUL, May 29 (Yonhap) -- "My Mister," a television series about an unlikely friendship between a 20-something woman and her senior colleague in his 40s, has topped the weekly TV chart, data showed Tuesday.

Starring singer-actor Lee Ji-eun, better known by her stage name IU, and Lee Sun-kyun, the heartwarming drama on tvN wrapped up on May 17 with its highest ratings and to audience applause.

Its final episode garnered a score of 249.5 on the weekly Content Power Index (CPI) for May 14-20.

When the 16-episode drama started in March, there were voices critical of what was presumed to be a romance between a young woman and a married man. After all, the singer-songwriter had been embroiled in a controversy of using the Lolita complex for her 2015 EP "Chat-shire."

   But the concern turned out to be groundless as the drama unfolded.

A poster for "My Mister," provided by tvN (Yonhap)

Lee Ji-an, played by Lee, has supported her sick grandmother on her own since she was six. She does whatever it takes to make money to repay her debt to Lee Kwang-il, the son of the cruel moneylender she accidentally killed when she was a middle schooler.

In her desperate attempt to escape from the deepening cycle of debt, she approaches Park Dong-hoon, played by Lee, a warm-hearted middle manager at the company she temps at. In spite of herself, she begins to feel sympathy for Park, who suffers the heavy weight of life in his own way.

Besides the main characters, there were not a few relatable, realistic supporting characters who all have a boy-next-door charm, as well as down-to-earth and self-deprecating humor.

Among them are Park's two helpless brothers, who do cleaning services and consider themselves failures -- for now -- but never give up on life. The three brothers, in a way, reflect the ordinary life of the country's middle-aged men or ajeossi in Korean, drawing audience support.

The oldest brother Park Sang-hun says, "How interesting it is that Korea went through so many different things for 50 years, but how I've achieved nothing for half a century."

Four cast members of tvN's "My Mister" pose for photos before a press event in Seoul on April 11, 2018. (Yonhap)

"It is about someone becoming special to someone else," producer Kim Won-suk, also known for such hit series as "Misaeng" and "Signal," said at a press event in Seoul last month.

"This one is in line with my previous works, in that it also tells about life together and that life changes for the better, if only slightly, by meeting and interacting with others."

   The CPI, created by CJ E&M and Nielsen Korea, measures the level of popularity, social media trending and influence on consumer behavior of entertainment TV programs aired on three major terrestrial networks -- MBC, SBS and KBS -- and seven cable channels owned by CJ E&M, including tvN, Mnet and OCN, during prime time. JTBC, another cable network that airs some highly popular entertainment shows and dramas, was not included in the survey.

 

This photo provided by tvN shows two posters for "My Mister." (Yonhap)

jaeyeon.woo@yna.co.kr

(END)

 

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/kwave/2018/05/29/3001000000AEN20180529002300315.html

 

 

Hi, I am just curious, the drama ended a while back, why is it still topping the TV charts? Or this refers to the last episode?

 

What are 2 other korean dramas that scored higher in the ratings chart in China (i recognize reply 1988 only)

Thanks! :)

Edited by Jillia
Please do not quote pics! Thanks! :)
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, kdramafanlsk said:

 

Hi, I am just curious, the drama ended a while back, why is it still topping the TV charts? Or this refers to the last episode?

 

What are 2 other korean dramas that scored higher in the ratings chart in China (i recognize reply 1988 only)

Thanks! :)

 

1st one is "Reply 1988"

2nd - Dear My Friends

3rd - High Kick!

 

Just want to point out that #8 is "I Live on Cheongdam-dong" which finished airing a pretty long time ago, so it's amazing that it is so high on this list.

 

Also, Park Hae-Young (writer of "My Ahjussi") was one of the writers on that show.

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, kdramafanlsk said:

 

Hi, I am just curious, the drama ended a while back, why is it still topping the TV charts? Or this refers to the last episode?

 

What are 2 other korean dramas that scored higher in the ratings chart in China (i recognize reply 1988 only)

Thanks! :)

 

Per the report, it's for weekly Content Power Index (CPI) for May 14-20

 

 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@chickfactor Thank you for translating that article.  As others have expressed their thoughts on this article (and so well), I'd like to add my 2 cents.  Um, more like 1 cent, because I'm tackling only part of the article.

 

- "Adult man and a young woman"

Me:  How about "adult man and adult woman"?  She's younger, it is true, but she's also an adult already.

 

- "...many pitiful situations...but DH treats only Ji An with too much deep empathy and his behavior (towards her) is excessive.  

Me:  Too much empathy?  Well, the more pitiable the situation, the more empathy it deserves, I think.  And what exactly was this "excessive behavior"?

 

- "Glamorization of violence and crime" 

Me:  I don't think the true depiction of families and friends gathering to protect others should be construed as glamorizing violence and crime.  These are family members - through blood, through beloved neighborhood associations, etc. - family members that "got your back" in times of need. They are not going around in packs terrorizing people for no reason.

 

- "Glamorization of Ji An's phone-tapping"

Me: Again, the misuse of the word "glamorization."  The phone-tapping was clearly wrong, and she knew it, but after the purpose for which she did it expired, it came to be a life-line for her, one that caused her to have an even deeper bond with him, one that strengthened her, one that she couldn't easily let go of because it was almost as if he was always there with her.  Sure, it's still an invasion of privacy, but the writer of the article made it seem like it was the evil of all evils.  

 

- Yoon Hee, the "perfect criminal"

Me:  Not quite perfect enough for me.  I've seen dramas where the adulteress is downright evil, with all kinds of scheming going on against the hubby and his love interest.  I had room in my heart for some sympathy for her because, despite the effort she put forth to fit in, it just wasn't happening.  She and hubby were drifting further and further apart.  I didn't hate her, and neither could DH, I think, but like DH, I wouldn't stick around. She done blew it!

 

More later...hopefully.  :) 

  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, maddymappo said:
 
Spoiler

 

 

  @chickfactor    Thank you for the translation of the article.  It is very profound and philosophical as you say, but I found myself nodding in agreement.  I made several comments about YH, as being the perfect bad wife, that no one could sympathize with. The only characteristics DH displayed which could irk her was his devotion and attentions to his family to the neglect of her, and also his lack of ambition.   That does not seem like enough to justify her having a affair with his worst enemy.   (the writer never lets us see anymore about that relationship. Did they sleep together?  Jian could hear everything going on but we never hear in on what happened in the bedroom).  Then at the end Jian asks YH how she could betray such a perfect guy? and YH says there are 100, 1000 reasons. Really?  Well we can't sympathize if we do not know what they are. We are purposely kept in the dark.  (and of course the little boy being in the USA - kept us from hoping the family would stay together, and not hurt the child).  Even the actress who played the role of YH, said that she does not miss playing this part because she was such a difficult character. I think JH was someone who must have deep reasons for her actions but it is never seen.

 

 The writer of this article also picks up on how both of DH's brothers were kidding DH and playful at the idea of DH meeting up with a young girl in a bar, yet of course horrified that YH would cheat on DH.  The double standard in a patriarchal conservative world. ( I mentioned about the brothers attitude toward the flirting with JiAn on this thread too.)   I think the article writer is delving very deep but she/he has come up with some pearls here. Ultimately the collective conservative elements won. 

 

I just want to add that I really enjoyed this drama, it was so well done. All around great acting, no one performance let us down. But cannot ignore the sociological angle that the writer of the article points out, because I felt the same way, that I was being played.

 

EDIT:  Just wanted to add that his article writer also brought out the idea of tribalism, collectivism. I think I missed that because I live in a big city in USA, but it is more felt in Korea.  I noted how they would all walk each other home in a pack. And then they absorbed JiAn into the pack.  She was protected by them The alpha dog (DH) had introduced her to the pack and so she was accepted, even grandma's funeral.   Interesting YH was never seen united with the pack. For whatever reason DH kept her out, or made her apart, or perhaps she was a modern woman who didn't feel comfortable that way. We will never know what was in her mind and experience (can you imagine having to act out her character, and not know why she does what she does or how she feels?).    

 

Yes there is right and wrong.  But even the wrong of murder is justified in JiAn's case because we know the circumstances, background, why she did what she did. We never know this about YH.

 

 

 

 

The article's writer brought up some good points, which came out of watching MA. Did the show's writer had all this in mind as she wrote MA? I absolutely think so. 

 

If I'm not mistaken, during the press conference, one of them said: These things happen in real life. What would you do it it happens to you? To me, this shows that the team behind MA meant to raise/address these issues pointed by the article's writer, and they wanted the audience to kick-start conversations within their circle. 

 

On YH: 

We don't know her exact reasons for having the affair, but we've seen many 'little' things that could lead to an unhappy marriage. Whether or not the audience sympathize with her lies within the audience's personal view: if this was you, and your husband keeps spending his time with his friends, how would you feel? If your husband, who's essentially being bullied by his boss, refuses to do anything about it, how would you feel many years down the line? If your husband always seem to look for something to make him happy, how would you feel? If deep down you know you can't make him happy, how would you feel? If  you don't feel any sympathy towards YH, what does that say about you? Is it wrong not to sympathize with YH?  

 

When DH said there's no point in coming back early as no one's home anyway, YH asked which came first? Him coming back late from the bar because she's always late? Or her coming back late from the office because he's always late?


We can use the same kinda question to find out why YH was never accepted into the tribe. Was she treated differently from the beginning because she seemed different than them? Did this then affect how she behaved around them? OR did she treat them differently from the beginning because they seemed different? Did this then affect how they behaved around her? 

 

There's something that's been lingering on my mind, why does DH hate JY so much? Yeah ok JY is a social climber, but what's wrong with that? Seems like something happened between the  three of them back in their uni days... 


On SH & KH:

I think it was only/mostly SH who teased DH about JA. When both brothers realised this is something else, the teasing stopped. Why? I don't think they'd condone him having an affair. So, not knowing how to react, they don't say anything anymore about JA (save for KH at the end), leaving it up to DH to make his choice. BUT, they're always there to support him. You've invited your cheating wife to celebrate with us? Ok man. We're going to your mistress' grandma's funeral? Ok man. 

 

Also note that KH almost always defended YH, and put forth the idea of 'Hey, we should celebrate YH's success & strength' around his mom, SH & DH. It was only natural for him to be horrified that this person he looks up to had an affair.

 

On 5/28/2018 at 2:02 PM, timidjock0819 said:

My apologies for cutting your post short. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions and that's fine. However, I will never see "hero worship" as a valid argument about Jian's feelings for DH. She knows what she wants and never backs down on it. Jian is written as a strong female character. It is quite insulting to minimize her love for DH as platonic or fatherly figure. Women find true love at different stages of life during childhood, high school, and older adult years. For Jian, she found that right person for her at the age of 21. She is not that young anymore compared to all other literary heroines in the last 20th century. Some people say that she will find another person after DH. I say not likely. DH is her other half. She waited 30,000 years for him. Do we still  think that she will move on and stay away from him permanently after the time jump? Pfft! one full year is such a short time:) for someone like Jian.

 

To add more on JA knowing what she wants and being a strong female character... 

 

Not too sure about Korean dramas, as this is the first time I'm over-analysing one (LOL), but Western movies & shows tend to depict women as being emotionally erratic, unsure of her feelings until  the men make their move. 

 

JA & JH are 100% sure of their feelings, and they always make the first move. In the case of YH, it is she who left DH (I imagine she knows she's worth more than merely functioning as his wife)

 

Jumping from one point to another, it may not seem so at a glance, but in MA, all the women are strong in their own way. 

 

A female pharmacist reached out to JA when she thought KB was the one who hurt her. Don't even get me started on AR. She's a championlah. 

  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chickfactor said:

Like, this drama is not saying all 45-year-old ahjussis need to go find themselves some 20-year-old young girl to fall in love with

Exactly. I can't believe a leading newspaper journalist can act so dumb. I felt like the writer probably have multiple personality disorder while reading that news. At one moment he's praising it and next he's criticizing. 

I really loved your post. The writer indeed created the drama as if it was meant to focus on two people's love against all odds. 

People keep forgetting that Yoon hee didn't even leave JY or had any qualms about it when she got to know that he imposed that bribery case on dong hoon. Her only issue was him not being serious about marrying her. And then she blamed him for harming dong hoon only after Ji An told her that JY has no plan of marrying her. So it's not like that takes away her part in the whole fraudery business. She knew all along what's happening. So deep in dong hoon's mind that's the reason for the divorce. And that's why like you said he asked JY if she knows about the bribe. Even if you forgive someone for cheating on you I think it would be hard to live with a partner who knew you were in danger but didn't do everything in their power to save you.  

Again upsetting to see that a major newspaper is publishing this kind of stupid silly and utterly misleading article.

 

1 hour ago, ccl82 said:

If your husband, who's being bullied by his boss, refuses to do anything about it, how would you feel many years down the line

That's the thing. She knows he's being bullied but still decides to love the same man who's  bullying him.  One thing is being unhappy in a marriage and next thing is to take it a step further and do something outright displeasing. 

I have a little bit of objection with @maddymappo's comment on Yoon hee being a perfect bad wife that no one could sympathize with. I think a lot of viewers could see where she's coming from. But then she did cross a line in their marriage which she shouldn't have since it's something way greater in scale than what dong hoon did by staying passive imo. Also I feel like the writer stayed true to real life events by showing her the way she was. Sometimes people in real life 'do' things which are incorrigible, beyond repair, so I think it's not  bad writing that we struggled to sympathize with Yoon Hee. In dramaland's perspective it's also refreshing since we always get characters either pure good or pure evil, and , yoon hee is just someone in between. She's not a bad person. And in marriages expectations and not being able to meet the expectation is a common problem, miscommunication is the major issue in case of dong Hoon and Yoon hee.

Also tbh Yoon Hee was never happy in that neighborhood like she says repetitively so I don't solely blame dong hoon. It's just that he has a larger support system, a lot of people he needs to stay in touch with, and it's just not the case for Yoon Hee. While I can see why she doesn't like so much mingling , to take it away from him or expect him to stop hang out with them, that's also cruelty. I guess we already talked about it a lot, but in marriage sometimes both party have to compromise and still love each other and respect each other's boundary. Somehow it didn't work out in this case.

Edited by Jillia
Please do not post consecutively, edit you previous post instead. Thanks! :)
  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am on episode 9 and just came across a line from DH that puzzles me. When JA said she hates JY because ajhussi hates him, DH replied "dont call me mister, call me manager". What does that mean? Was it correctly translated? Seems DH was establishing their relationship as a professional one?

 

(Btw, on ep 9 it was clearly established that DH likes JA. It was JY who said that if DH eats and drinks with a woman it meant he likes that woman. That is why in the following scene when he waited for JA when she missed her stop and JA emerged from the subway looking for him and their eyes met and stayed in contact the entire time he was crossing the street, it totally took a more romantic undertone. =) gosh, i can rewatch that scene again and again. :wub:)

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, chickfactor said:

 

 

Inchon Business

If It's Love, than even Phone-Tapping is ok? "My Ahjussi" should have been rated Age 19

[TV Review] Thoughts after Drama is Over

Kim, Sun-Hee

5/28/2018

Spoiler

 

I want to think over "My Ahjussi" once more, which has already finished airing. It is a masterwork that follows the pedigree of "Misaeng" and "Reply 1988" so it is difficult to escape its 'imagery' and compared to the viewer ratings, it has inspired a great deal of fondness, so I have a feeling it will have a long, lingering impact. On the other hand, there is never-ending controversy calling attention to the twisted "sexual consciousness" of men who desire relationships with young women. Despite that, this drama was “can’t miss” for me, and I enjoyed it. “My Ahjussi” had the deep, human scent of “Misaeng” and “Reply 1988” and filled the empty space that those dramas had left, enveloping me in an inescapable [__] of sympathy.

 

These are the reasons I determine that this drama is a masterpiece.

 

First, it depicted reality in such shudder-inducing detail that it inspired deep introspection about the recovery of humanity, and in the lives of these plain people, the savory flavors of philosophy and aesthetics were inherent.

 

Second, Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the main characters, their match was truly amazing. You could not even imagine either of them played by anyone else. They were not the Lee Sun-Kyun and Lee Ji-Eun we had been watching before. It was to the point that if we watched them in their previous works (in other mediums) it felt unfamiliar and you wanted to turn your head. It made you wonder if half the work of a drama is about finding the right actors for the parts, that was how perfectly these roles fitted them.

 

Third, even the small roles and their rough characters seemed so alive, and had so much charisma and gravity that the lines between the main characters and supporting characters blurred.

 

But there are still many problems that we close our eyes to. On top of the age difference between the main character, there is excessive violence, glamorization of crime, inequality in education level, etc. - it became the subject of endless controversies. But despite all that, everyone's story was told with gravity. In the end, everything was wrapped up in the larger meaning, and left a beautiful and strong message, so the show concluded amidst a storm of applause. In the hearts of the modern audience who live repressed lives due to the hard lines of our society, they felt the existence of strong sympathy and humanity and (the drama) left them a warm, healing message.

 

Watching this drama, I felt like I was watching a swindler with his hand on my money pouch strapped to my waist. The drama’s problematic factors were clear, but when I watched without paying attention, it felt like the swindler’s hand reached inside my money pouch. No, at some points, I preferred to be deceived.

 

The Problem Elements of “My Ahjussi” that I Observed

 

These are the problem elements I discovered.

 

First, it was clearly the objective (of the drama) to show a romantic relationship between an adult man and a young woman. There are many pitiful situations in the drama, but Dong-Hoon treats only Ji-An with too much deep empathy and his behavior (towards her) is excessive. The drama subverted these “suspicions” in sophisticated ways and provided meaningful pretext.

 

Looking down at Ji-an’s feet in short socks that exposed her ankles and wearing worn-out sneakers Dong-Hoon said, “Why do you wear such short socks in winter? Do you think it’s sexy?” He goes to a bar in which he had a drink with her before, looks around and asks the owner, “Did you see that girl who came with me before, by chance? That pretty girl…” The drama’s PD insisted that he wanted to depict human love rather than man-woman love, but he insisted on referencing “sexiness” and “pretty,” thereby not letting the viewer’s expectations for romance die. He is a skilled hunter who killed two rabbits with one stone: get high ratings and silence the critics.

 

The second is the glamorization of violence and crime. In the drama, the “victim mentality” is handled with violence. Especially, there is a “solidarity conscience” in which familial or tribal rules govern their actions (rather than government rules), in which people determine for themselves what is right despite being adults, and to assume all consequences (in proportion to) how difficult their lives are. The main character who is in his mid-40s and his family have each failed to achieve independence from such existence and continue to surround each other, and band together in a “sticky” bond and straddle the line between warm human love and collectivism.

 

The most serious thing is the glamorization of Ji-An’s phone-tapping. She begins tapping Dong-Hoon’s phone with the purpose of committing a crime, but through it, she feels compassion and love. But even after she becomes “on his side” and no longer his enemy, the tapping continues. After she is on his side, she feels more compassion and supports him more through the phone-tapping.

 

Through the hot tears of the viewers, many excellent scenes are shown that involve the phone-tapping. If someone comes to truly love you and you become precious to them, then is it okay to be phone-tapped? In this world, would anyone ever feel okay to be phone-tapped? Even if I think about this 100, 1000 times, and it is still appalling.

 

This drama is a genius alchemist, able to draw out the emotions of the viewers. Especially, the phone-tapping becomes the alchemist’s most effective and novel tool. That this feels beautiful actually makes me fearful. So this drama should have been rated Age 19, at least.

 

Third, the biggest, most unpleasant element is that it is centered on one cuckolded man. Dong-Hoon’s wife, Yoon-Hee is having an affair. Her partner happens to be an old foe of her good-hearted husband. Thus, Yoon-Hee’s purpose becomes a "perfect criminal" than no one can sympathize with. None of the character nor any viewer has any reason to sympathize with her.

 

Yoon-Hee is successful in her career, with a kind husband and treated like a queen by her humane (thoughtful) in-laws. But she was lonely. Even after her husband became a father, he regarded his mother and brothers first in his heart and did not give affection to Yoon-Hee. Without missing a day, he hung out with his brothers and neighborhood friends, leaving the spot next her empty.

 

He married, but his heart could not become independent, and he found social satisfaction with his parent, brothers, and friends, so it was a chilly marriage. The drama made sure that Yoon-Hee could not receive sympathy and emphasizes Dong-Hoon’s loneliness. Not only that, Yoon-Hee reproaches herself harshly and determines that she will accept any punishment that Dong-Hoon gives her. She even atones by taking Ji-An’s side, the woman who now fully occupies Dong-Hoon’s heart and helps him sincerely. It cannot be denied that the story is weighted towards the man’s perspective to the point of cruelty.

 

On the other hand, Sang-Hoon (older bro) and Ki-Hoon (younger bro) were excited the moment they became aware of Ji-An’s existence. They wondered if a flirtation had begun between a young woman and their brother, Dong-Hoon, and they became happy and envious. And when they found out about Yoon-Hee’s affair, they became even more enraged and sad than Dong-Hoon did. To show these scenes side-by-side in the same drama feels so shameless that I cannot suppress my feelings of displeasure. In the final episode when Dong-Hoon sobs in his empty house while thinking of Ji-An did we finally have the “space” to properly see the relationship between Dong-Hoon and Ji-An.

 

After being wounded by the perfect criminal Yoon-Hee, Dong-Hoon, who did not have to recover easily, that is this ahjussi’s victory. And for the pursuit of his personal nirvana, Kyum-Duk left Jung-Hee, leaving her with lifelong regret. So for “the greater cause” (of their men) were Yoon-Hee and Jung-Hee sacrificed? It’s hard not to jeer at the excuse that people use, this concept of “the greater cause.”

 

In the end, the loves depicted in this drama are not healthy. Many characters have focused too much of the needs of their original family and never became independent even after their marriage. And the very concept of their family is too biased towards the man’s blood relatives. Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the man and woman couple is buried in their excessive compassion.

 

It speaks of endlessly warm humanity, but...

 

This drama speaks of endlessly warm humanity. But it is all based on someone’s assumed unconditional sacrifice and devotion. In the end, it skillfully and sophisticatedly indoctrinates a very old-fashioned patriarchal perspective that is dream of by men. But after absorbing its lingering imagery and the many varied opinions, I discovered an even greater monster. More than I expected, I witnessed many people saying, “This is the type of adult I would like to become.”

 

What other drama can so easily transform men and woman of all ages to kind and innocent children, in just one instant? I had a terrifying thought that even the patriarchy was a sacrificial lamb to the needs of this society. (???)

 

The many strifes in this drama was always left to be solved by an individual. Dong-Hoon, who felt deep compassion for Ji-An goes alone to the feisty loan shark in his 20s, Kwang-Il and fights a life-and-death battle with him. Ji-An is left alone to care for her old, infirm grandmother who is also deaf. Seeing her situation, Dong-Hoon tells her to seek government assistance, and Ji-An begins to be saved by Dong-Hoon.

 

Two unemployed brothers in their 40s live with their mother, eating her warm food. When they learn that Dong-Hoon was beaten by Kwang-Il, Hoo-Gye-dong’s residents ran out prepared for battle. When Ji-An’s penniless grandmother dies, Sang-Hoon gives all his hard-earned money he earned by cleaning so that Ji-An can have a grand funeral for her.

 

A mother’s endless sacrifice, a head-of-household who cannot collapse due to his family’s expectations, the wife who endures everything in order for one man to achieve his fulfillment, and the granddaughter, the neighbor… perhaps the irresponsible desires of society are hidden in these “beautiful customs?” We are being given a lifestyle with a different shape. And therefore, time has come for us to acknowledge and protect individual wants and needs in our society rather than sacrifice for the greater good. Thinking about it, this drama's language is too familiar and suits our tastes too well.

 

When our days are bound to be busy and difficult to conquer, it comforts and appeases us so skillfully. Suddenly we have become gentle sheep, making us chant, "Yes, those were the good old days." But we have come to cross a pond that we cannot turn back from. To achieve our current society in which eating and living has not become so difficult, many individuals had to sacrifice so much. Our lives are so that we barely have enough space to save ourselves. Haven't we all experienced so many times in which the most important thing was so protect ourselves?

 

Now that we solved the problem of how to make a living, and now demand protection from society, "My Ahjussi" tells us this. "The old days were good, that is the true way to live," it tells us warmly and beautifully. When I get to this point, in my heart, "My Ahjussi" transforms into "Just an Old Fogey." This is the limit of the swindler's fancy hand tricks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

@chickfactorThanks so much for getting to the rest of it, I was struggling! Great translation. This was such a thought provoking piece.

 

헤어 나올 수 없는 공감의 장으로 나를 끌어 들였다 ==  "I was drawn into an inescapable position of empathy?"

 

The gist of her essay is, "I should be hating this show! Why do I love it so much??"

 

She says that we have progressed so much as a society that we can move beyond our basic needs. But instead of becoming more progressive, this show is regressive. It pushes for an atavistic "return to the good old days".

 

I think the problem is she expects too much from the story. It is true that many conservative points of view are embedded in the story. Dong Hoon is a conservative old fogey. He's an engineer!!! He is the main character whom we all come to empathise with. 

 

I can see the conundrum here. Life is already so difficult for women, especially in a conservative, patriarchal society like South Korea. Yet in such a deeply redemptive, moving healing story, they choose to present it from the mind of a staid, conservative man. Could they not have pushed forward a more progressive agenda?

 

But here's where I think of Barack Obama again. What he said about black fathers. That to solve the problem of African Americans, we need to first understand what's wrong with black fathers.

 

I see the same thing at work here: in order to solve the problem of patriarchal, conservative Korean society, we have to first come to understand how the mind of a conservative, traditional Korean man works first. I.e. The Ahjussi which has become a word with such negative connotations. Perhaps it may be naive of me, but I think, just as with black fathers--it is only when we understand the problem, that we can move forward together.

 

This makes me think of Misty. In Go Hye Ran we had arguably the strongest, toughest, most badass female character in a Korean Drama. I was pumping my fist for her throughout the show as she took down all the bad guys. Yet what sort of message did the ending leave us with? (spoilers below)

 

Spoiler

 

That being a strong, tough, woman will only lead to your downfall and ruin. That in my opinion is a far more anti-feminist message than the one in My Ahjussi

 

 

 

 

Not being Korean, I didn't have such expectations.

 

I went into the show not knowing anything about it beforehand and expected a thriller/mystery. I came out at the end of it discovering one of the greatest love stories of all time.

 

The fact that it's between a much older man and a younger woman? I thought it was so sensitively and subtly portrayed that it never felt icky or wrong. It felt like the most natural thing in the world.

 

The thing is, and I may be simplifying things here, but it never came across as a "Lolita complex" to me because Dong Hoon clearly never desired a sexual affair with a younger woman. In fact, it was his fear of being perceived as the predator that made his behavior towards her so restrained. This is where things get meta: Sang Hoon, Ki Hoon and Gwang Il, who all made sweeping generalisations about Dong Hoon and Ji An at first, all end up protecting their relationship in the end. 

 

Exactly like us, the audience!

 

Here are a few other bits I liked about her essay (my translation) :

 

첫째, 기성인 남성과 어린 여성 대한 이성 관계구도는 엄연히 의도된 것이다. 드라마 에는 수많은 연민 대상들 있지만 동훈은 유독 지안(이지은 분)에게 너무나 깊게 이입하 과하게 행동한다. 드라마 이러한 의혹을 세련되게 따돌리면서도 의미 있는 빌미를 제공하기도 한다. 

 

First, it is obvious that the intent was to show the relationship between a grown man and a young woman. Although there were many things to pity in the show,  it is only towards Ji An that Dong Hoon so deeply and excessively overreacts. In this way the drama not only diverted our suspicions, it provided meaningful excuses.

 

Me: Yes, that confirms what we've said all along :lol:

 

도청을 통해 그 누군가가 나를 진심으로 사랑하고 아끼게 된다면 도청을 당해도 좋을까?

 

If someone were to truly fall in love, treasure and cherish me by eavesdropping on me, is that okay?

 

Me: That's the main reason I did not expect them to form a romantic relationship in the first 14 episodes. It was a deeply unbalanced relationship. It's only when the wiretapping stops that they're back on equal ground. Then and only then does their relationship truly begin.

 

Does it have hints of Stockholm's syndrome (where the captive falls in love with the captor)? Yes. I agree with her. It's complicated. But Dong Hoon is not always the passive actor he seems. We're not in his head, but he is pretty consistent in his actions. He is fully aware of Ji An's transgressions. But he decides, "it's nothing". Why? Because:

 

"You saw my pathetic life. And instead you fell in love with me." (paraphrasing, can't remember exact phrase) 

 

Ji An thinks he might hate her because of the wiretapping. What does he say?

 

"When you know someone, it doesn't matter what they do. And I know you."


That's when I knew we were headed for one of the greatest love stories of all time.

 

드라마는 그런 윤희가 동정 받을 수 없는 단단한 장치를 마련해두고 동훈의 외로움을 부각시킨다. 더군다나 윤희 자신마저도 스스로를 맹렬히 비난하고 동훈의 어떠한 처분에도 순응하리라 결심한다. 동훈의 마음을 지배하고 있는 지안의 편에 서서 진심으로 돕는 것으로 속죄하기도 한다. 잔인할 만큼 남성의 입장에 편중되어 있다는 느낌을 지울 수가 없다.

 

The drama emphasizes Dong Hoon's loneliness by making Yeon Hee a character we are able to empathise with.

 

Me: I think most of us could empathise with Yeon Hee? This was an interesting perspective because I thought Dong Hoon's own culpability in the marriage breaking down was conveyed just as well.

 

As penitence, she even takes the side of Ji-An who owns Dong Hoon's heart.

 

Me: :wub:

 

 

결국 마지막 회에서 보여 빈집에 홀로 남아 지안 떠올리며 오열하는 동훈 모습 통해 내심 동훈과 지안 관계를 지지하는 여지 남겼다고 생각한다. 

 

In the final episode, we are given the space to consider their relationship when Dong Hoon, left alone in the empty house, breaks down while thinking of Ji An.

 

Me: Gosh, this was a mouthful to translate. And really deep. But this writer saw exactly what I saw in that scene: left alone at home, and in his life, Dong Hoon finally has the space to think about the true nature of his relationship with Ji An. And it's open to multiple interpretations, but mine is:

 

Dong Hoon: I promised her I will be happy. But what the xxx am I still doing with my life?

 

and

 

Dong Hoon: I miss her so much.

 

Conclusion: Is this show morally ambiguous? Yes. There are multiple moral dilemmas, and the choices the characters make are not straightforward. 

 

That's why it's a masterpiece.

  • Like 11
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, chickfactor said:

 

 

인천경기

사랑하면 도청도 ok? '나의 아저씨'는 19금이어야 했다

[TV 리뷰] 뒤끝 있는 드라마 후기 <나의 아저씨>

김선희(good77)

18.05.28

 

If It's Love, than even Phone-Tapping is ok? "My Ahjussi" should have been rated Age 19

[TV Review] Thoughts after Drama is Over

Kim, Sun-Hee

5/28/2018

 

이미 지난 5월 17일에 종영한 tvN 수목드라마 <나의 아저씨>를 다시 한 번 곱씹고 싶다. <미생> <응답하라 1998>의 계보를 잇는 수작이기에 그 여운에서 쉽게 빠져나올 수가 없었고 시청률에 비해 많은 애호가를 남긴 작품이기에 두고두고 파장을 남기리라는 예측이 들기도 한다. 한편, 어린 여성과의 이성교제를 로망 하는 남성들의 삐뚤어진 성의식을 비롯한 각종 논란도 끊임이 없었다. 그럼에도 불구하고 나는 이 드라마를 한 회도 빠짐없이 본방사수로 즐겼다. <나의 아저씨>는 진한 사람 냄새를 풍긴 <미생>과 <응팔>의 빈자리를 메꾸어 주며 헤어 나올 수 없는 공감의 장으로 나를 끌어 들였다.

 

I want to think over "My Ahjussi" once more, which has already finished airing. It is a masterwork that follows the pedigree of "Misaeng" and "Reply 1988" so it is difficult to escape its 'imagery' and compared to the viewer ratings, it has inspired a great deal of fondness, so I have a feeling it will have a long, lingering impact. On the other hand, there is never-ending controversy calling attention to the twisted "sexual consciousness" of men who desire relationships with young women. Despite that, this drama was “can’t miss” for me, and I enjoyed it. “My Ahjussi” had the deep, human scent of “Misaeng” and “Reply 1988” and filled the empty space that those dramas had left, enveloping me in an inescapable [__] of sympathy.

 

이 드라마를 수작으로 꼽는 이유는 다음과 같다.

 

These are the reasons I determine that this drama is a masterpiece.

 

첫째, 소름 끼치게 섬세한 현실묘사를 통해 인간성 회복에의 깊은 성찰을 이끌어 냈으며 평범한 이들의 삶 속에 내재한 철학과 미학이 깊이 있는 감칠맛을 더했다.

 

First, it depicted reality in such shudder-inducing detail that it inspired deep introspection about the recovery of humanity, and in the lives of these plain people, the savory flavors of philosophy and aesthetics were inherent.

 

둘째, 동훈과 지안이라는 주인공들의 캐릭터 매칭이 그야말로 기가 막혔다. 동훈을, 그리고 지안을 더는 다른 인물로 상상하기조차 어렵게 했다. 그들은 그간 보아온 이선균과 이지은이 아니었다. 그들 본래의 모습이 다른 매체를 통해 나올 때면 오히려 낯설어 고개를 돌리고 싶을 지경이었다. 두 인물과 배역의 매칭이 드라마의 중반에서 후반으로 갈수록 드라마 완성도의 반은 차지하는 게 아닐까 싶을 정도로 꼭 맞는 옷이었다.

 

Second, Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the main characters, their match was truly amazing. You could not imagine either of them played by anyone else. They were not the Lee Sun-Kyun and Lee Ji-Eun we had been watching before. It was to the point that if we watched them in their previous works (in other mediums) it felt unfamiliar and you wanted to turn your head. It made you wonder if half the work of a drama is about finding the right actors for the parts, that was how perfectly it fitted them.

 

셋째, 다소 낯선 조역들의 거칠거칠한 연기마저도 흡인력 있는 연출로 녹여내어 주인공과 조역의 구분이 모호할 정도로 살아있는 묵직한 캐릭터들을 완성시켜 나갔다.

 

Third, even the small roles and their rough characters showed so much charisma and gravity that the lines between the main characters and supporting characters blurred.

 

그러나 끝내 눈 감아 주기 어려운 문제가 남아있다. 드라마는 남녀 주인공의 나이 격차를 비롯하여 과도한 폭력, 범죄의 미화, 양성 불평등 시각 등에 대한 끊임없는 논란의 대상이 되었다. 그럼에도 불구하고 자신들의 이야기를 우직하게 이어 나갔다. 결국 그 모든 것이 더 크고 중요한 의미로 귀결됨으로써 아름답고 강렬한 메시지를 남기며 박수갈채 속에서 마무리 되었다. 첨예한 경계들에 치여 잔뜩 움츠린 채 살아가는 현대인들의 가슴 속에 깊은 연민과 뜨거운 인간애의 존재를 확인시키며 따뜻한 치유의 메시지를 남긴 것이다.

 

But there are still many problems that we close our eyes to. On top of the age difference between the main character, there is excessive violence, glamorization of crime, inequality in education level, etc. - it became the subject of endless controversies. But everyone was wrapped up in the larger meaning, and left a beautiful and strong message, so it concluded amidst a storm of applause. In the hearts of the modern audience who live repressed lives due to the hard lines of our society, they felt the existence of strong sympathy and humanity and (the drama) left them a warm, healing message.

 

이 드라마를 보면서 나는 내내 허리춤에 찬 전대에 손을 대고 야바위꾼의 놀음을 지켜보는 심정이었다. 드라마가 가진 문제적 요소들이 선명한데, 뭔가 정신 줄 놓고 구경하다보면 내 전대의 돈이 다 야바위꾼의 호주머니로 들어갈 것만 같았다. 아니, 어느 지점에서는 차라리 속아버리고도 싶었다.

 

Watching this drama, I felt like I was watching a swindler with his hand on my money pouch strapped to my waist. The drama’s problematic factors were clear, but when I watched without paying attention, it felt like the swindler’s hand reached inside my money pouch. No, at some points, I preferred to be deceived.

 

내가 목격한 <나의 아저씨> 속 문제적 요소들

 

The Problem Elements of “My Ahjussi” that I Observed

 

내가 발견한 문제적 요소는 다음과 같다.

 

These are the problem elements I discovered.

 

첫째, 기성인 남성과 어린 여성에 대한 이성 관계구도는 엄연히 의도된 것이다. 드라마 안에는 수많은 연민의 대상들이 있지만 동훈은 유독 지안(이지은 분)에게 너무나 깊게 이입하고 과하게 행동한다. 드라마는 이러한 의혹을 세련되게 따돌리면서도 의미 있는 빌미를 제공하기도 한다.

 

First, it was clearly the objective (of the drama) to show a romantic relationship between an adult man and a young woman. There are many pitiful factors in the drama, but Dong-Hoon treats only Ji-An with too much deep empathy and his behavior (towards her) is excessive. The drama subverted these “suspicions” in sophisticated ways and provided meaningful pretext.

 

발목이 드러난 짧은 양말에 낡은 운동화를 신은 지안의 발을 내려다보며 동훈(이선균 분)은 말한다. "추운 겨울에 발목이 드러나는 양말을 신는 건 왜지? 섹시하다고 생각하나?" 동훈이 지안과 술 한 잔 하던 술집에 들어서서 지안을 찾는 듯 두리번거리다가 술집 주인에게 묻는다. "전에 저랑 같이 왔던 그 애 혹시 안 왔나요? 왜 그 예쁜 애..." 드라마 감독은 남성과 여성이 아닌 인간애를 그리고 싶다고 밝히면서도 굳이 '섹시함', '예쁜 애' 등을 언급함으로써 굳이 남녀관계에 대한 시청자들의 기대감을 잠재우지 않는다. 시청률과 비판여론 잠재우기의 두 마리 토끼를 잡는 노련한 사냥꾼이다.

 

Looking down at Ji-an’s feet in short socks that exposed her ankles and wearing worn-out sneakers Dong-Hoon said, “Why do you wear such short socks in winter? Do you think it’s sexy?” He goes to a bar in which he had a drink with her before, looks around and asks the owner, “Did you see that girl who came with me before, by chance? That pretty girl…” The drama’s PD insisted that he wanted to depict human love rather than man-woman love, but he insisted on referencing “sexiness” and “pretty,” thereby not letting the viewer’s expectations for romance die. He is a skilled hunter who killed two rabbits with one stone: high ratings and silence the critics.

 

둘째, 폭력과 범죄의 미화이다. 드라마 속 피해의식은 주로 폭력으로 대처된다. 특히, 혈연이나 지연으로 맺어진 연대의식은 과한 감정이입으로 갈등의 주체가 성인임에도 불구하고 스스로의 판단으로 대처해나가기 어려울 만큼 온통 뒤얽히기 일쑤이다. 40대 중반의 주인공과 그 가족들은 각각의 삶 속에서 독립하지 못하고 서로에게 매몰되어 있으며 끈끈한 지역사회의 연대 또한 따뜻한 인간애과 집단이기주의의 경계를 수도 없이 넘나든다.

 

The second is the glamorization of violence and crime. In the drama, the “victim mentality” is handled with violence. Especially, there is a “solidarity conscience” in which familial or tribal rules govern their actions (rather than government rules), in which people determine for themselves what is right despite being adults, and to assume all consequences (in proportion to) how difficult their lives are. The main character who is in his mid-40s and his family have each failed to achieve independence from such existence and continue to surround each other, and band together in a “sticky” bond and straddle the line between warm human love and collectivism.

 

무엇보다 가장 심각한 점은 지안의 도청에 대한 미화이다. 지안은 범죄를 목적으로 동훈의 휴대폰에 도청 프로그램을 심고 도청을 하게 되지만 그 과정에서 동훈에게 연민과 사랑을 느낀다. 그러나 동훈이 더 이상 적이 아닌 같은 편이 된 이후에도 도청은 계속된다. 동훈의 편에 선 지안은 도청을 통해 그를 더욱 더 연민하고 지지한다.

 

The most serious thing is the glamorization of Ji-An’s phone-tapping. She begins tapping Dong-Hoon’s phone with the purpose of committing a crime, but through it, she feels compassion and love. But even after she becomes “on his side” and no longer his enemy, the tapping continues. After she is on his side, she feels more compassion and supports him more through the phone-tapping.

 

많은 시청자들이 뜨거운 눈물로 함께한 명장면 중 많은 장면들이 도청 상황에서 벌어진다. 도청을 통해 그 누군가가 나를 진심으로 사랑하고 아끼게 된다면 도청을 당해도 좋을까? 이 세상 그 누가 나를 도청해도 상관이 없을 수 있을까? 백 번 천 번 생각해봐도 끔찍한 일이다.

 

Through the hot tears of the viewers, many excellent scenes are shown that involve the phone-tapping. If someone comes to truly love you and you become precious to them, then is it okay to be phone-tapped? In this world, is it ever okay to be phone-tapped? I think about this 100, 1000 times, and it is still appalling.

 

이 드라마는 등장인물, 또는 시청자들의 공감을 이끌어내는 가히 천재적인 연금술사이다. 특히, 도청은 연금술사의 가장 효과적이고 참신한 도구로 사용된다. 그것이 너무나 아름답게 그려져 있다는 점은 심지어 두려운 마음까지 들게 한다. 그래서 이 드라마는 최소한 19금이었어야 한다.

 

This drama is a genius alchemist, able to draw out the emotions of the viewers. Especially, the phone-tapping becomes the alchemist’s most effective and novel tool. That this feels beautiful actually makes me fearful. So this drama should have been rated Age 19.

 

셋째, 드라마의 인물, 이야기, 주제 그 모든 것을 한 코에 꿰고 있는 남성 중심 구조가 가장 불쾌한 문제적 요소이다. 동훈의 아내, 윤희(이지아 분)는 바람을 피운다. 상대는 하필이면 세상 착한 동훈의 숙적인 도준영(김영민 분)이다. 그럼으로써 윤희의 외도는 그 누구도 연민할 수 없는 완벽범죄가 되고 만다. 극중 인물들도 시청자들도 그녀를 연민할 이유가 전혀 없다.

 

Third, the biggest, most unpleasant element is that it is centered on one cuckolded man. Dong-Hoon’s wife, Yoon-Hee is having an affair. Her partner happens to be an old foe of her good-hearted husband. Thus, Yoon-Hee’s purpose becomes a "perfect criminal" than no one can sympathize with. None of the character nor any viewer has any reason to sympathize with her.

 

윤희는 직업적으로 성공한 여성이고 착한 남편과 인간미 넘치는 시댁 가족들에게 떠받들어지는 여왕 같은 존재이다. 그러나 그녀는 외로웠다. 남편은 결혼 후 한 아이의 아빠가 되어서도 어머니와 형제들만을 최우선으로 인식하며 윤희에게 정을 주지 않았다. 거의 하루도 빠짐없이 형제들이나 동네 친구들과 어울려 윤희의 곁을 비우기 일쑤였다.

 

Yoon-Hee is successful in her career, with a kind husband and treated like a queen by her humane in-laws. But she was lonely. Even after her husband became a father, he regarded his mother and brothers first in his heart and did not give affection to Yoon-Hee. Without missing a day, he hung out with his brothers and neighborhood friends, leaving the spot next her empty.

 

결혼은 했지만 마음은 독립하지 못한 채 부모형제, 친구들의 대리 만족을 채우기에만 급급한 서늘한 결혼생활이었다. 드라마는 그런 윤희가 동정 받을 수 없는 단단한 장치를 마련해두고 동훈의 외로움을 부각시킨다. 더군다나 윤희 자신마저도 스스로를 맹렬히 비난하고 동훈의 어떠한 처분에도 순응하리라 결심한다. 동훈의 마음을 지배하고 있는 지안의 편에 서서 진심으로 돕는 것으로 속죄하기도 한다. 잔인할 만큼 남성의 입장에 편중되어 있다는 느낌을 지울 수가 없다.

 

He married, but his heart could not become independent, and he found social satisfaction with his parent, brothers, and friends, so it was a chilly marriage. The drama made sure that Yoon-Hee could not receive sympathy and emphasizes Dong-Hoon’s loneliness. Not only that, Yoon-Hee herself reproaches herself harshly and determines that she will accept any punishment that Dong-Hoon gives her. She even atones by taking Ji-An’s side, the woman who now fully occupies Dong-Hoon’s heart and helps him sincerely. It cannot be denied that the story is weighted towards the man’s perspective to the point of cruelty.

 

한편, 동훈의 형 상훈(박호산 분)과 동생 기훈(송새벽 분)은 지안의 존재를 의식했을 때 분명 들떠 있었다. 젊은 여자애와 동훈 사이에서 뭔가 썸이 생기나보다 즐거워하고 부러워했다. 그랬던 그들이 윤희의 외도를 알게 되자 동훈보다 더한 분노와 슬픔을 드러냈다. 적어도 한 드라마에서 나란히 표현하기에는 너무도 염치없는 장면이 아닌가 하는 불쾌감을 누를 길이 없었다. 결국 마지막 회에서 보여준 빈집에 홀로 남아 지안을 떠올리며 오열하는 동훈의 모습을 통해 내심 동훈과 지안의 관계를 지지하는 여지를 남겼다고 생각한다.

 

On the other hand, Sang-Hoon (older bro) and Ki-Hoon (younger bro) were excited the moment they became aware of Ji-An’s existence. They wondered if a flirtation had begun between a young woman and their brother, Dong-Hoon, and they became happy and envious. And when they found out about Yoon-Hee’s affair, they became even more enraged and sad than Dong-Hoon did. To show these scenes side-by-side in the same drama feels so shameless that I cannot suppress my feelings of displeasure. In the final episode when Dong-Hoon sobs in his empty house while thinking of Ji-An did we finally have the “space” to properly see the relationship between Dong-Hoon and Ji-An.

 

완벽한 범죄자 윤희에게 상처받고 회복이 결코 쉽지 않아도 되는 동훈, 그 아저씨의 승리이다. 동훈은, 그리고 자신의 성불을 위해 일방적으로 정희를 떠나 정희에게 있어 평생의 한으로 남은 겸덕(박해준 분)은 소위 말하는 대의명분을 위해 윤희를, 그리고 정희(오나라 분)를 희생시킨 것일까? 이 지점에서 소위 큰일 한다는 사람들의 변명거리로 남용되는 '대의명분'이라는 표현에 대해 조소가 번지는 것을 멈추기 어려웠다.

 

After being wounded by the perfect criminal Yoon-Hee who cannot recover easily, that is this ahjussi’s victory. And for the pursuit of his personal nirvana, Kyum-Duk left Jung-Hee, leaving her with lifelong regret. So for “the greater cause” (of their men) were Yoon-Hee and Jung-Hee sacrificed? It’s hard not to jeer at the excuse that people make for “the greater cause.”

 

결론적으로 이 드라마에서 다뤄진 사랑은 그다지 건강하지 않았다. 여러 인물들이 결혼을 통해 독립한 이후에도 원가족의 욕구에 지나치게 이입하고, 정신적으로 독립하지 못했다. 게다가 그 가족이라는 개념마저도 남성의 혈육 중심으로 편향되어 있었다. 동훈과 지안, 두 남녀의 서로에 대한 사랑 또한 자기연민에 의한 과도한 감정의 매몰에 불과했다.

 

In the end, the love(s) depicted in this drama is not a healthy one. Many characters have focused too much of the needs of their original family and never became independent even after their marriage. And the very concept of their family is too biased towards the man’s blood relatives. Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the man and woman couple is based originally on excessive compassion.

 

끊임없이 따뜻하고 깊은 인간애를 말하지만...

 

It speaks of endlessly warm humanity, but...

 

드라마는 끊임없이 따뜻하고 깊은 인간애를 말한다. 그러나 그 모든 것은 누군가의 무조건적인 희생과 헌신을 전제로 한다. 결국 과거의 남성중심 사회로의 회기를 꿈꾸는 기성세대 남성의 욕망이 너무나 잘 만들어진 드라마적 기술 속에서 세련되게 주입되고 있다. 그러나 긴 여운만큼이나 다양한 감상평을 남긴 후기를 접하면서 나는 더 큰 괴물을 발견하게 되었다. 생각보다 많은 사람들이 이 드라마를 통해 "나도 이런 어른이 되고 싶다"고 말하는 것을 보게 된 것이다.

 

This drama speaks of endlessly warm humanity. But it is based on someone’s assumed unconditional sacrifice and devotion. It skillfully and sophisticatedly indoctrinates a very old-fashioned patriarchal perspective. But after absorbing its lingering imagery and the many varied opinions, I discovered an even greater monster. More than I expected, I witnessned many people saying, “This is the type of adult I would like to become.”

 

그 어떤 드라마가 이렇게 손쉽게 수많은 남녀노소를 한 순간 착하고 순수한 어린이로 만들 수 있다는 말인가. 이 지점에서 기성세대 남성의 욕망마저도 이 사회가 품은 욕망을 위해 바쳐진 희생양에 불과하다는 섬뜩한 기분이 들었다.

 

What other drama can so easily transform men and woman of all ages to kind and innocent children, in just one instant? I had a terrifying thought that even the patriarchy was a sacrificial lamb to the needs of this society. (???)

 

이 드라마 속 수많은 갈등의 해결자는 모두 개인의 몫이었다. 지안에게 깊은 연민을 느낀 동훈은 홀로 혈기 왕성한 20대 사채업자, 광일(장기용 분)을 찾아가 목숨을 건 몸 싸움을 벌인다. 청각장애에 노환까지 겹친 노조모(손숙 분)를 어린 지안이 책임진다. 그 처지를 알고 기관의 도움을 받도록 알려주는 것으로 지안은 동훈에게 구원받기 시작한다.

 

The many strifes in this drama was always solved by an individual. Dong-Hoon, who felt deep compassion for Ji-An goes alone to the feisty loan shark in his 20s, Kwang-Il and fights a life-and-death fight with him. Ji-An alone is left to care for her old, infirm grandmother who is also deaf. Seeing her situation, Dong-Hoon tells her to seek government assistance, and Ji-An begins to be saved by Dong-Hoon.

 

40이 넘은 두 실업자 아들은 노모의 집에 얹혀 따신 밥을 먹고 산다. 동훈이 광일에게 맞은 사실을 알고 후계동 주민들은 전투태세로 가해자를 찾아 나선다. 무일푼 지안의 할머니가 돌아가시자 동훈의 형, 상훈은 청소해서 어렵게 모은 돈으로 지안으로 하여금 폼 나는 장례를 치르도록 도와준다.

 

Two unemployed brothers in their 40s live with their mother, eating her warm food. When they learn that Dong-Hoon was beaten by Kwang-Il, Hoo-Gye-dong’s residents ran out prepared for battle. When Ji-An’s penniless grandmother dies, Sang-Hoon gives all his hard-earned (with cleaning) money so that Ji-An can have a grand funeral for her.

 

어머니의 한없는 희생, 가족의 기대 속에서 결코 무너지지 않는 가장의 희생, 한 남자의 뿌듯한 삶을 완성하기까지 모든 걸 감내하는 아내의 희생, 그리고 손녀, 이웃... 이 모든 것의 뒤에 미풍양속으로 둔갑한 무책임한 사회의 욕망이 숨어 있는 것은 아닐까? 이제 우리에게 새로운 형태의 삶이 주어지고 있다. 따라서 사회도 구성원의 인정과 희생에 기댄 교화와 감독의 기능에서 개인의 부족을 채우고 보완하는 보호체제로 달라져야할 지점에 와 있다고 생각한다. 그럼에도 불구하고 오늘을 사는 기성세대에게 있어 익숙한 사회의 기능은 우리의 무지함을 일깨우고 더 힘차게 살아가기를 계도하는 감독자로서의 기능이다. 그러다보니 이 드라마의 어법은 너무나도 친숙하고 구미에 착 감긴다.

 

A mother’s endless sacrifice, a head-of-household who cannot collapse due to his family’s expectations, the wife who endures everything in order for one man to achieve his fulfillment, and the granddaughter, the neighbor… perhaps the irresponsible desires of society are hidden in these “beautiful customs?” We are being given a lifestyle with a different shape. And therefore, time has come for us to acknowledge and protect individual wants and needs in our society.

 

하마터면 만만치 않은 오늘의 나의 삶에 급급할 뻔한 우리를 아주 능숙하게 회유하고 달랜다. 어느새 우리 모두 순한 양이 되어서 "그래, 그때가 좋았어"라고 읊조리게 만든다. 그러나 우리는 돌아갈 수 없는 강을 건너왔다. 먹고 사는데 어려움이 없는 사회를 이룩하기 위해 개인들은 얼마나 많은 희생들을 감내했던가. 우리의 삶은 이미 나 자신을 구원하기에도 버거운 온갖 촘촘한 갈등구조에 둘러싸여 있다. 나를 지키는 것만이 최선인 상황을 얼마나 많이들 경험하고 있는가.

 

먹고사는 문제를 해결했으니 사회의 보호를 받을 차례라고 말하는 개인들에게 <나의 아저씨>는 말하고 있다. '예전이 좋았지 않느냐고, 그게 진짜로 살아가는 맛이라고' 따뜻하고 아름답게 타이르고 있다. 여기까지 느꼈을 때 내 마음 속에서 <나의 아저씨>라는 제목은 <그저 꼰대>로 둔갑한다. 야바위꾼의 화려한 손기술은 딱 여기까지이다.

 

--

 

I got too tired and I'll translate the rest later.

 

My impression:

 

It's too philosophical. It's not really an actual TV review. The conclusion is about how this show promotes old-fashioned values of total sacrifice and that our modern society does not need this kind of message?

 

Ugh, I don't know. This one gave me a headache.

 

There is no real conclusion, just some comments about how people shouldn't sacrifice themselves for others and instead look out for themselves instead, but this show sends the wrong message ... and I'm doubtful that it was written by a staff writer, but looks like some blog post instead? No real conclusion, just a string of observations.

 

Wow. So many words.  I can’t tell if the author is reacting to the drama or giving a treatise on the evils of misogyny and patriarchy.  

 

Glorifying violence? I only see it as such if there was no purpose to what was shown.  And was it really that graphic? The most graphic thing about it were the blood and bruises.  I think Train to Busan would be more violent considering those zombies chomping away at human flesh. Duh.

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rather than glorifying violence didn't the drama try to make the statement that violence is a heinous crime in every aspect? That's why dong hoon went back and shouted and lashed at kwang gil as his behavior with Ji An was totally unacceptable for him. If the writer has a problem with the way dong hoon and his brothers/friends tackle situations, then I have nothing more to say. This is not like the first time we are seeing things like this in a show. I mean there are movies made on bank robberies, there are Spielberg movies where a con artist has been depicted as a hero and these movies get awards for these types of projections. Dong Hoon said from the start if anyone was hurting his mom he would go as far as killing him too. And I think any normal loving and caring person would feel that way so I don't get what the fuss is about. But I am still glad that she thought the drama is more about dong hoon and Ji An, so we don't necessarily disagree on the main subject matter I guess haha. Although I am still scratching my head over whether dong hoon was really crying in his apartment thinking of Ji An, I wish there were some proofs to confirm this lol. 

  • Like 11
  • LOL 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I never saw Yoon Hee as the “perfect criminal” wife that no one can sympathize with, because I honestly felt for her even if I don’t agree with what she did.  She’s not evil, but she was weak and selfish, an intelligent woman who made a huge mistake.  But I understood how lonely and neglected she must have felt in her marriage.  When she told Dong Hoon about the times when she would ask him where he was and he would say he’s eating with his family, i.e. mother and brothers, I believe she was right to feel hurt because as his wife, she should have been part of that family.  (That, to me, was very telling about how Dong Hoon defines his relationships as well as the extent - or lack thereof - of his love for Yoon Hee.)

 

Hence, taking that into consideration, I never for one second had the illusion that Park Dong Hoon is a perfect man.  He’s very flawed and I think he would be the first to say that.  I think he realized that he had a lot of shortcomings insofar as their marriage is concerned, but what really hurt him was Yoon Hee’s infidelity and deliberate attempt to collude with Joon Young in destroying him.  Yoon Hee may have had just cause initially against Dong Hoon, but her subsequent actions effectively weakened her stand and she knew that.

 

However, it also doesn’t change the fact that there is a double standard prevalent here.  For example, Yoon Hee as the wife was expected to be less succesful than her husband.  She was expected to integrate herself into his family but there didn’t seem to be the same expectations with him.  At least, I’m basing this solely on what the drama had depicted about Yoon Hee and her marriage to Dong Hoon.

 

I’m not exactly sure why this author seemed to think that Park Dong Hoon was being shown as a perfect man. He wasn’t.  I’m sure everyone would agree with me. But what makes his character shine is the fact that, despite his flaws, his innate goodness and integrity comes through and in the end, it was that which gave him the courage to finally stand up to those who subjected him and others who relied on him - his team members and Ji An most especially - to injustice.

 

And what’s this about the age gap again being an issue?  I thought we were against double standards here. 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kdramafanlsk said:

 

@kdramafanlsk  said " When JA said she hates JY because ajhussi hates him, DH replied "dont call me mister, call me manager". What does that mean? Was it correctly translated? Seems DH was establishing their relationship as a professional one?"

(Btw, on ep 9 it was clearly established that DH likes JA. It was JY who said that if DH eats and drinks with a woman it meant he likes that woman. That is why in the following scene when he waited for JA when she missed her stop and JA emerged from the subway looking for him and their eyes met and stayed in contact the entire time he was crossing the street, it totally took a more romantic undertone. =) gosh, i can rewatch that scene again and again. :wub:)
 

When Ji-an said that she hates CEO because Ajusshi hates him....it probably struck a cord inside Engineer Dong Hoon.  He doesn't expect this young woman with her hard life where she can barely get by, to fight his battle....  He was very touched, so he warns her to treat him as a manager, and not a personal friend.  He did not want her hurt in his struggle.... after all it is between him and the CEO.

 

Secondly, what she said shows that she care a great deal about him, with very strong feelings for him, so much that he is not prepared to reciprocate, despite his own strong feelings for her.  He is after all, still married with a son who is still trying to put on the façade of a successful happy man.

 

In his way, he is trying in episode 9 to keep a small distance between them, for his comfort and peace of mind....for she represents DANGER...to his self control. In episode 1 when his brothers commented on his scruples, he later whispered to himself  "because I've never been tempted".....

 

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, chickfactor said:

 

 

Inchon Business

If It's Love, than even Phone-Tapping is ok? "My Ahjussi" should have been rated Age 19

[TV Review] Thoughts after Drama is Over

Kim, Sun-Hee

5/28/2018

 

I want to think over "My Ahjussi" once more, which has already finished airing. It is a masterwork that follows the pedigree of "Misaeng" and "Reply 1988" so it is difficult to escape its 'imagery' and compared to the viewer ratings, it has inspired a great deal of fondness, so I have a feeling it will have a long, lingering impact. On the other hand, there is never-ending controversy calling attention to the twisted "sexual consciousness" of men who desire relationships with young women. Despite that, this drama was “can’t miss” for me, and I enjoyed it. “My Ahjussi” had the deep, human scent of “Misaeng” and “Reply 1988” and filled the empty space that those dramas had left, enveloping me in an inescapable [__] of sympathy.

 

These are the reasons I determine that this drama is a masterpiece.

 

First, it depicted reality in such shudder-inducing detail that it inspired deep introspection about the recovery of humanity, and in the lives of these plain people, the savory flavors of philosophy and aesthetics were inherent.

 

Second, Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the main characters, their match was truly amazing. You could not even imagine either of them played by anyone else. They were not the Lee Sun-Kyun and Lee Ji-Eun we had been watching before. It was to the point that if we watched them in their previous works (in other mediums) it felt unfamiliar and you wanted to turn your head. It made you wonder if half the work of a drama is about finding the right actors for the parts, that was how perfectly these roles fitted them.

 

Third, even the small roles and their rough characters seemed so alive, and had so much charisma and gravity that the lines between the main characters and supporting characters blurred.

 

But there are still many problems that we close our eyes to. On top of the age difference between the main character, there is excessive violence, glamorization of crime, inequality in education level, etc. - it became the subject of endless controversies. But despite all that, everyone's story was told with gravity. In the end, everything was wrapped up in the larger meaning, and left a beautiful and strong message, so the show concluded amidst a storm of applause. In the hearts of the modern audience who live repressed lives due to the hard lines of our society, they felt the existence of strong sympathy and humanity and (the drama) left them a warm, healing message.

 

Watching this drama, I felt like I was watching a swindler with his hand on my money pouch strapped to my waist. The drama’s problematic factors were clear, but when I watched without paying attention, it felt like the swindler’s hand reached inside my money pouch. No, at some points, I preferred to be deceived.

 

The Problem Elements of “My Ahjussi” that I Observed

 

These are the problem elements I discovered.

 

First, it was clearly the objective (of the drama) to show a romantic relationship between an adult man and a young woman. There are many pitiful situations in the drama, but Dong-Hoon treats only Ji-An with too much deep empathy and his behavior (towards her) is excessive. The drama subverted these “suspicions” in sophisticated ways and provided meaningful pretext.

 

Looking down at Ji-an’s feet in short socks that exposed her ankles and wearing worn-out sneakers Dong-Hoon said, “Why do you wear such short socks in winter? Do you think it’s sexy?” He goes to a bar in which he had a drink with her before, looks around and asks the owner, “Did you see that girl who came with me before, by chance? That pretty girl…” The drama’s PD insisted that he wanted to depict human love rather than man-woman love, but he insisted on referencing “sexiness” and “pretty,” thereby not letting the viewer’s expectations for romance die. He is a skilled hunter who killed two rabbits with one stone: get high ratings and silence the critics.

 

The second is the glamorization of violence and crime. In the drama, the “victim mentality” is handled with violence. Especially, there is a “solidarity conscience” in which familial or tribal rules govern their actions (rather than government rules), in which people determine for themselves what is right despite being adults, and to assume all consequences (in proportion to) how difficult their lives are. The main character who is in his mid-40s and his family have each failed to achieve independence from such existence and continue to surround each other, and band together in a “sticky” bond and straddle the line between warm human love and collectivism.

 

The most serious thing is the glamorization of Ji-An’s phone-tapping. She begins tapping Dong-Hoon’s phone with the purpose of committing a crime, but through it, she feels compassion and love. But even after she becomes “on his side” and no longer his enemy, the tapping continues. After she is on his side, she feels more compassion and supports him more through the phone-tapping.

 

Through the hot tears of the viewers, many excellent scenes are shown that involve the phone-tapping. If someone comes to truly love you and you become precious to them, then is it okay to be phone-tapped? In this world, would anyone ever feel okay to be phone-tapped? Even if I think about this 100, 1000 times, and it is still appalling.

 

This drama is a genius alchemist, able to draw out the emotions of the viewers. Especially, the phone-tapping becomes the alchemist’s most effective and novel tool. That this feels beautiful actually makes me fearful. So this drama should have been rated Age 19, at least.

 

Third, the biggest, most unpleasant element is that it is centered on one cuckolded man. Dong-Hoon’s wife, Yoon-Hee is having an affair. Her partner happens to be an old foe of her good-hearted husband. Thus, Yoon-Hee’s purpose becomes a "perfect criminal" than no one can sympathize with. None of the character nor any viewer has any reason to sympathize with her.

 

Yoon-Hee is successful in her career, with a kind husband and treated like a queen by her humane (thoughtful) in-laws. But she was lonely. Even after her husband became a father, he regarded his mother and brothers first in his heart and did not give affection to Yoon-Hee. Without missing a day, he hung out with his brothers and neighborhood friends, leaving the spot next her empty.

 

He married, but his heart could not become independent, and he found social satisfaction with his parent, brothers, and friends, so it was a chilly marriage. The drama made sure that Yoon-Hee could not receive sympathy and emphasizes Dong-Hoon’s loneliness. Not only that, Yoon-Hee reproaches herself harshly and determines that she will accept any punishment that Dong-Hoon gives her. She even atones by taking Ji-An’s side, the woman who now fully occupies Dong-Hoon’s heart and helps him sincerely. It cannot be denied that the story is weighted towards the man’s perspective to the point of cruelty.

 

On the other hand, Sang-Hoon (older bro) and Ki-Hoon (younger bro) were excited the moment they became aware of Ji-An’s existence. They wondered if a flirtation had begun between a young woman and their brother, Dong-Hoon, and they became happy and envious. And when they found out about Yoon-Hee’s affair, they became even more enraged and sad than Dong-Hoon did. To show these scenes side-by-side in the same drama feels so shameless that I cannot suppress my feelings of displeasure. In the final episode when Dong-Hoon sobs in his empty house while thinking of Ji-An did we finally have the “space” to properly see the relationship between Dong-Hoon and Ji-An.

 

After being wounded by the perfect criminal Yoon-Hee, Dong-Hoon, who did not have to recover easily, that is this ahjussi’s victory. And for the pursuit of his personal nirvana, Kyum-Duk left Jung-Hee, leaving her with lifelong regret. So for “the greater cause” (of their men) were Yoon-Hee and Jung-Hee sacrificed? It’s hard not to jeer at the excuse that people use, this concept of “the greater cause.”

 

In the end, the loves depicted in this drama are not healthy. Many characters have focused too much of the needs of their original family and never became independent even after their marriage. And the very concept of their family is too biased towards the man’s blood relatives. Dong-Hoon and Ji-An, the man and woman couple is buried in their excessive compassion.

 

It speaks of endlessly warm humanity, but...

 

This drama speaks of endlessly warm humanity. But it is all based on someone’s assumed unconditional sacrifice and devotion. In the end, it skillfully and sophisticatedly indoctrinates a very old-fashioned patriarchal perspective that is dream of by men. But after absorbing its lingering imagery and the many varied opinions, I discovered an even greater monster. More than I expected, I witnessed many people saying, “This is the type of adult I would like to become.”

 

What other drama can so easily transform men and woman of all ages to kind and innocent children, in just one instant? I had a terrifying thought that even the patriarchy was a sacrificial lamb to the needs of this society. (???)

 

The many strifes in this drama was always left to be solved by an individual. Dong-Hoon, who felt deep compassion for Ji-An goes alone to the feisty loan shark in his 20s, Kwang-Il and fights a life-and-death battle with him. Ji-An is left alone to care for her old, infirm grandmother who is also deaf. Seeing her situation, Dong-Hoon tells her to seek government assistance, and Ji-An begins to be saved by Dong-Hoon.

 

Two unemployed brothers in their 40s live with their mother, eating her warm food. When they learn that Dong-Hoon was beaten by Kwang-Il, Hoo-Gye-dong’s residents ran out prepared for battle. When Ji-An’s penniless grandmother dies, Sang-Hoon gives all his hard-earned money he earned by cleaning so that Ji-An can have a grand funeral for her.

 

A mother’s endless sacrifice, a head-of-household who cannot collapse due to his family’s expectations, the wife who endures everything in order for one man to achieve his fulfillment, and the granddaughter, the neighbor… perhaps the irresponsible desires of society are hidden in these “beautiful customs?” We are being given a lifestyle with a different shape. And therefore, time has come for us to acknowledge and protect individual wants and needs in our society rather than sacrifice for the greater good. Thinking about it, this drama's language is too familiar and suits our tastes too well.

 

When our days are bound to be busy and difficult to conquer, it comforts and appeases us so skillfully. Suddenly we have become gentle sheep, making us chant, "Yes, those were the good old days." But we have come to cross a pond that we cannot turn back from. To achieve our current society in which eating and living has not become so difficult, many individuals had to sacrifice so much. Our lives are so that we barely have enough space to save ourselves. Haven't we all experienced so many times in which the most important thing was so protect ourselves?

 

Now that we solved the problem of how to make a living, and now demand protection from society, "My Ahjussi" tells us this. "The old days were good, that is the true way to live," it tells us warmly and beautifully. When I get to this point, in my heart, "My Ahjussi" transforms into "Just an Old Fogey." This is the limit of the swindler's fancy hand tricks.

 

Rather than aprehensive critize those review was sound ambigue pov like some of soompier write here. When we start talking the distinction between Man and women ,i am sure it is impossible for us to make ends meet.

MA could critize in any and each aspect in the point  which edge you most favour to seen.however it would not take much effort or brain  to devise how depth the writer brought such unpleasant issue and mastering in once lenght conclussion at the end,  how beautiful though, unselfness could safe a wandering soul to find her/his own home.this the essential thought i could found to ease my mind to recover the open ending.

Mysoginity,feminist? lolita complex? Patriatrichal? Age gap?lousy writing?

Whatever!?:rolleyes:

Those all stigma no new at all.

Ones i trully apreciated and value this drama the most is the consistency in each character, we earth bound humane we supposed to cry, fragile, sad and  happy but sometime the toughness of life not allowed ourself to do so.seeing how all the character in MA struggle to finding the meaning of their existence could made us take a look our journey as human too, those all the beauty we ever seen in MA.

And of course by all means the heartfelt love line between Jian and DH is the most appealing romance in my dictionary, i still hungry and weeping over their chimestry, goodness can the writer  writing just about them.(i missed their walking talking date so much)

 

lastly this drama would be stand at present with all longlife issue and complexcity attention they draw i belief they are good for next generation.ahead of time.

 

IMG_20180520_141715.jpg

 

Happy wednesday blues..soompier-_-

 

Jianaa miss you girl..

Dong honssi are you call her already..?

Sometime action is more powerfull than a words...take action please.:)

 

 

 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, tiger457_stv said:

@kdramafanlsk  said " When JA said she hates JY because ajhussi hates him, DH replied "dont call me mister, call me manager". What does that mean? Was it correctly translated? Seems DH was establishing their relationship as a professional one?"

(Btw, on ep 9 it was clearly established that DH likes JA. It was JY who said that if DH eats and drinks with a woman it meant he likes that woman. That is why in the following scene when he waited for JA when she missed her stop and JA emerged from the subway looking for him and their eyes met and stayed in contact the entire time he was crossing the street, it totally took a more romantic undertone. =) gosh, i can rewatch that scene again and again. :wub:)
 

When Ji-an said that she hates CEO because Ajusshi hates him....it probably struck a cord inside Engineer Dong Hoon.  He doesn't expect this young woman with her hard life where she can barely get by, to fight his battle....  He was very touched, so he warns her to treat him as a manager, and not a personal friend.  He did not want her hurt in his struggle.... after all it is between him and the CEO.

 

Secondly, what she said shows that she care a great deal about him, with very strong feelings for him, so much that he is not prepared to reciprocate, despite his own strong feelings for her.  He is after all, still married with a son who is still trying to put on the façade of a successful happy man.

 

In his way, he is trying in episode 9 to keep a small distance between them, for his all comfort and peace of mind....for she represents DANGER...to his self control. In episode 1 when his brothers commented on his scruples, he later whispered to himself  "because I've never been tempted".....

 

Thanks @tiger457_stv! Now I get that line, it got lost due to translation for me... What's ironic is by the end of ep 9 he has gotten irrevocably involved in JA's life. He got into a fist fight with Kwang Il.

 

What needs to be pointed out is that after getting info on JA DH chose to help her and confront her tormentor. The same way that JA after learning things about DH thru the bug, chose to help him. They both could have chosen otherwise. Exactly why DH forgave JA about that bug.:)commentaries on MA that put much emphasis on that bug as a breach of confidence have to view it from DH's perspective. 

 

There is a saying, intimate information about you is like a knife, foes are those that use it against you. Friends are those who wont.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if it ever occurred to those who complain about the age gap that there is a purpose to that. It was never intended to pander to the sexual fantasies of middle-aged men.  It was put there because it will make Park Dong Hoon’s moral dilemma about his relationship with Ji An all the more acute and his inner conflict all the more intense. He’s a morally upright man.  I’m sure when he first started helping out Ji An, he thought he was merely being kind to a girl who was little more than a child in age as far as he’s concerned.  The last thing he probably expected was to realize that Ji An was not a child but a woman.  And that she saw him as a man.  And that he would feel such a deep connection to her that she would matter so much to him, almost beyond rhyme or reason.  That probably  drove him up the wall, so to speak.

 

Yet throughout the drama, we can see how steadfast and determined he was to keep a certain distance between them.  You will never see him take advantage of Ji An, even avoiding any physical contact, regardless if the situation calls for it. Take for example how he ran away from her after they brought her grandmother to the living facility and how he made sure to sit somewhere where she won’t have any space to sit near him.  Then when she was crying at the morgue when her grandmother died, he took care to just hold her upper arms to help her up but he still made sure to hold her away from him. And when he finally found her in that shed at the dump, she was so broken and yet he never held herto comfort her, not even a mere touch of the hand.  He just watched her as she cried. And he refused to hug her the first time she asked.  He only allowed it when he knew it would be the last time they would see each other. Even then, you could see how stiffly he held himself, indicating the level of control he was exercising then.

 

So I don’t see how some people think there’s something wrong with their age gap in this drama. Honestly. :huh:

  • Like 13
  • Thanks 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...