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[Movie 2017] The Fortress 남한산성 Namhansanseong

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October 5, 2017

 

'The Fortress' becomes fastest Chuseok movie to surpass 1 million in attendance

 

SEOUL, Oct. 5 (Yonhap) -- "The Fortress," a South Korean film depicting King Injo of the Joseon Dynasty taking refuge from a Chinese invasion, has become the fastest movie released during the Chuseok holiday to surpass 1 million in attendance, its distributor said Thursday.

 

CJ Entertainment said "The Fortress" got over the 1 million mark with 552,747 viewers Wednesday. The film premiered Tuesday, with 444,527 watching it on the opening day.

 

It puts "The Fortress" one day ahead of the pace set by "The Face Reader," which then went on to draw 9.13 million viewers in 2013.

 

"Gwanghae: the Man Who Became the King" remains the most successful film to be released during the Chuseok holiday, attracting 12.31 million viewers following its 2012 release. That film reached 1 million in four days.

 

Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuck and adapted from a best-selling novel, "The Fortress" follows the embattled king's 47 days of hiding from an invasion by the Qing Dynasty, which ultimately ended in him surrendering to a conquering Chinese general.

 

This image, provided by CJ Entertainment, shows the promotional poster for the film "The Fortress." (Yonhap)

This image, provided by CJ Entertainment, shows the promotional poster for the film "The Fortress." (Yonhap)

 

jeeho@yna.co.kr

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Actor Lee Byung Hun talks about THE FORTRESS in this Showbiz Korea interview, with English subs.

 

Published on October 5, 2017 by ARIRANG K-POP

 

 

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Photo: CJ Entertainment USA @cjent_usa

 

Check out #THEFORTRESS, a record-breaking Korean film, at CGV Cinemas LA/Buena Park!
#Nowplaying #LeeByungHun #KimYoonSeok #ParkHaeIl #GoSoo

 

22277666_1245281365575780_5967093262282915840_n.jpg

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October 6, 2017

 

'The Fortress' gathers audience of 2 million in 4 days

 

AEN20171006002800320_01_i.jpg

 

SEOUL, Oct. 6 (Yonhap) -- "The Fortress," a South Korean film depicting King Injo of the Joseon Dynasty taking refuge from a Chinese invasion, gathered an audience of 2 million people in the four days after its release, its distributor said Friday.

 

CJ Entertainment said earlier that "The Fortress," released Tuesday, became the fastest movie released during the Chuseok holiday to surpass 1 million viewers, which it did in only two days.

 

The latest figure also sets a new record for movies released over the Chuseok holiday.

 

Directed by Hwang Dong-hyuck and adapted from a best-selling novel, "The Fortress" follows the embattled king's 47 days of hiding from an invasion of the Qing Dynasty, which ultimately ended in him surrendering to a conquering Chinese general.

 

colin@yna.co.kr

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October 8, 2017

 

‘The Fortress’ dominates box office over Chuseok

Historical drama “The Fortress” topped the Korean box office by a wide margin over the Chuseok holiday.

 

The film amassed 424,409 viewers across the country Saturday, according to the Korean Film Council’s statistics, ranking first place daily for five consecutive days since Tuesday. 

 

The film directed by Hwang Dong-hyuk tells the story of the 1636 Chinese invasion of Joseon and stars Lee Byung-hun, Kim Yoon-seok and Park Hae-il. It has sold over 2.6 million tickets since its opening Tuesday. 

 

Ranking second on Saturday was “The Outlaws,” an action thriller directed by Kang Yoon-sung and starring Ma Dong-seok and Yoon Kye-sang, which sold 369,758 tickets. 

 

“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” came in third with 226,913 tickets. 

 

Matthew Vaughn’s “Kingsman,” starring Taron Egerton and Colin Firth, has sold over 4.1 million tickets since its opening in local theaters on Sept. 27. 

 

“Kingsman” surpassed the 4 million-viewer mark Friday, setting the record for attracting the most number of viewers in the shortest time among films rated for audiences over 19. 

 

(doo@heraldcorp.com)

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October 8, 2017

 

[Herald Interview] Why Park Hae-il is called a ‘blank sheet’

 

Hailed as one of Korea’s most versatile actors, Park takes on role of struggling Joseon king

 

Directors have called Park Hae-il a “blank sheet,” an actor who completely transforms through his roles. With boyish features and a difficult-to-fathom aura about him, Korean film fans say he possesses a Janus-like charm, similar to the Roman god of duplicity -- you can’t quite tell whether he embodies good or evil.

 

Park says he’s familiar with the description. “Director Yim Soon-rye told me I was like a white canvas that could become any color, after filming ‘Waikiki Brothers,’” he said at an interview Thursday at a cafe in Palpan-dong, Seoul, referring to his first film.

 

Park debuted as a musical actor in 1995, then crossed over to film in 2001.

 

His filmography is diverse. He played an ambiguous murder suspect in Bong Joon-ho’s mystery drama “Memories of Murder” (2003), and a shameless womanizer in the romantic comedy “Rules of Dating” (2005). In “A Muse” (2012), a 30-something Park played a 70-year-old poet attracted to a high school student. In 2013, Park played a slacker film director who moves back in with his mother.

 

image
Park Hae-il (CJ Entertainment)

 

In the historical drama “The Fortress,” which hit local theaters Tuesday, Park takes on the daunting task of portraying Joseon’s King Injo at his most vulnerable. The film is set during the 1636 Chinese invasion of Joseon, when the king is forced to retreat to

 

Namhansanseong, a mountain fortress southeast of Seoul. Under siege, King Injo is faced with the choice of either preserving the lives of his people by surrendering or resisting at the risk of being wiped out by an incomparably powerful army. 

 

“He’s a very suspecting and anxious character,” Park said of his rendition of King Injo.

 

Park says he’s not an actor who can slip comfortably into his roles. “I’m not agile enough to be joking at one point and then suddenly begin shooting. I tried to maintain (Injo’s) anxiety off-screen as well.”

 

image
Park Hae-il (CJ Entertainment)

 

The strain is palpable throughout the film. The camera frequently closes in on Park’s nervous face as King Injo tries to make the right decision amid a sea of diverging arguments raised by his advisers -- choosing between survival and dignity.

 

The story of King Injo’s eventual surrender is a well-known but distressing episode in Korean history. “It’s a sad part of history and perhaps one that we don’t really want to show the world. … But it’s not every day that as an actor, you come across a script that has this serious an approach to history, which is why I decided to take on the role,” Park said.

 

By Rumy Doo (doo@heraldcorp.com)

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