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RayAmbler7

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@avondale16  ~ did you like daughter seo young? I managed to finish it but somehow I didn't like the drama at all. it was kind of meh for me. maybe it was because I don't remember particularly liking even any of the side characters.

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@cenching, I was having a good time reading the "Is There a German in Canada Here" thread aka "German Abs @Dhakra Edition" thread, when I read this that I wanted to respond to.  I figured I might as well respond to you here, though, since I'm comfortable writing here and it seems as if the other thread has died down.

 

On 2/20/2019 at 5:43 PM, cenching said:

Talking about addressing family members, Chinese got the most detailed ones.....We addressed our family from mother's and father's side differently.....Grandparent from mother's and father's side specifically and differently addressed including uncles and aunties. For uncles or aunties who are older or younger than our parent, we addressed them differently too not to mentioned another bunch of uncles or aunties by marriages....Usually in Filipino or English when someone said, "He is my uncle", we will ask, "From which side?". But in Chinese when you said, "二叔" or "Er Shu", all Chinese will know that the person is your Second uncle from father's side who is younger than your father.....:mrgreen:

 

Koreans have a title for every relation that one might have, and differentiates from which side of the family the relationship is. So, examples:

 

Mother's side of the family is "wae" family. 

Maternal uncle is wae samchoon.

Maternal aunt is ee-mo. Older maternal aunt is kun ee-mo (literally "big maternal aunt". Younger maternal aunt is ja-gun ee-mo (literally small maternal aunt).

Maternal grandfather is wae haraboji.

Maternal grandmother is wae harmoni.

 

Father's side of the family is "chin" family.

Paternal uncle older than one's father is kun abeoji (literally big father)

Paternal uncle younger than one's father is ja-gun abeoji (literally small father)

Paternal aunt is go-mo. Older paternal aunt is kun go-mo. Younger maternal aunt is ja-gun go-mo.

Paternal grandfather is haraboji.

Paternal grandmother is wae haraboji.

 

And, then there are the terms for the siblings and cousins, of course, which includes a differentiator depending on the gender of the speaker as well. Then there is another set of terms for the various in-law relationships. That's also not including the different levels of honorific endings to denote respect or familiarity.

 

So, by the title used, one can define the exact relation between you and the one you're speaking to and the respect and responsibility due or owed.

 

I get the sense that Chinese familial titles may be as complicated as this from your post? Or do you think Chinese titles are even more complicated?

 

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30 minutes ago, stroppyse said:

I was having a good time reading the "Is There a German in Canada Here" thread aka "German Abs @Dhakra Edition" thread, when I read this that I wanted to respond to.  I figured I might as well respond to you here, though, since I'm comfortable writing here and it seems as if the other thread has died down.

Oh gosh how we hijacked that thread..poor guy could not even respond...:joy:

734

 

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Is it funny that it confuses me on both paternal and maternal that I would ended up calling both side the same thing. (Like I gave up and just call them the same thing. Haha)

 

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@stroppyse

I would say the details are almost the same and I noticed some similarities between Korean and TeoChew as well from your list....

 

Mother's side of the family is "Gua" family,

Maternal uncle is Ah Gu or Ku, and we address him depend upon his birth order. TuaKu = First/Oldest Uncle, JieKu = Second Uncle and so on with youngest being calls SoiKu, Soi means small/young..

Maternal aunt is Ah Ee/Ie, and the same with Uncle also being address by birth order.

Maternal grandfather is Gua Kong/Gong, Gua means outside literally

Maternal grandmother is Gua Ma

 

Father's side of the family is "Chin" family.

Paternal uncle older than one's father is A Pek, with birth order in front..

Paternal uncle younger than one's father is A Cek, with birth order in front..

Paternal aunt is Gou/Kou, with birth order as well.

Paternal grandfather is Chin Kong/Gong or Lai Kong/Gong, with Lai literally means inside

Paternal grandmother is Chin Ma or Lai Ma

 

Beside the Uncles and Aunties by marriages should be addressed with different title too....

The wives of Ah Gu/Ku are Ah Kim with the husband's birth order. Ex. TuaKu's wife will be TuaKim

The wives of Ah Pek are Ah Em with the husband's birth order. The same with above

The wives of Ah Cek are Ah Sim with the husband's birth order. The same with above

 

The husbands of Ah Gou/Kou are Kou Tio with the wife's birth order. The same with above

The husbands of A Ee/Ie are Ee/Ie Tio with the wife's birth order. The same with above

 

Dizzy yet?? :crazy::lol:

 

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@sushilicious

You will be corrected if you called them all the same in my family....Us Chinese take it as biggie about the birth order in the family...Maternal side is considered less important than paternal side....That's how patriarch is Chinese....

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, sushilicious said:

Is it funny that it confuses me on both paternal and maternal that I would ended up calling both side the same thing.

 

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For the Hainanese , that is the case...so I called both my granddad and grandma - "gong-gong" and "por-por"...not for the cantonese ...

Love your signature :joy:

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Edited by triplem
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@triplem

I noticed in most Chinese dialects how the way we addressed our grandparents are almost the same.

Gong Gong, Por Por

Gong Gong, Ama

Gung Gung, Por Por

Ye Ye, Por Por

We switch it around.....:lol:

 

742

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, cenching said:

@triplem

I noticed in most Chinese dialects how the way we addressed our grandparents are almost the same.

Gong Gong, Por Por

Gong Gong, Ama

Gung Gung, Por Por

Ye Ye, Por Por

We switch it around.....:lol:

 

742

lmao...i know rite. I have Hainanese paternal grandparents and Cantonese maternal grandma..so I was always confused. It was worst calling all the uncle and aunties. Nevertheless it is a nice tradition and it has this sense or respect to it. My husband is Portuguese Eurasian , so my boy just calls everyone aunty and uncle..no need to think. 

:joy:

 

746

Edited by triplem
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@triplem @sushilicious

Unfortunately even though both my Paternal and Maternal grandparents are Cantonese they spoke non Cantonese...:lol: Maternal side speak Hakka and Paternal side speak TeoChew....So I have been switching languages since the moment I uttered my first word..Poor me....:crazy: Not to mentioned the Indonesian/Malay as well.....Now is my children turn to get confuse. Hubs isn't a Chinese so no problem on his side but every time we "balik kampung" my children need me to whispered on their ear each title of my extended family especially the oldies who feel entitled to be addressed properly....:lol:

 

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I was watching Battle of ChangSa when I heard this song but can never found it since have no idea what is the title what so ever....Finally....:)

 

Chinese Twilight or Trails of Angels.....

 

 

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Pengsan @cenching with that a pek, a cek etc lol haha.... :scream: the Korean bloodline shared by @stroppyse sounds easier.

 

@Lmangla @avondale16 i watch some of Daughter Seoyoung and in beginning was interesting and couple have good chemistry. But like all those 50 series type, its going in circle :sweatingbullets: and i dropped it.

 

756

 

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