Quantcast
Jump to content
Kaizen68

[Drama 2017] Saimdang, Light's Diary 사임당, 빛의 일기

Recommended Posts

@liddi

"Gyeom spoke to the Crown Prince about Silla and Goryeo dynasties traded with other countries. He goes on to name Guilin 桂林 and Byeokrando 碧瀾渡 as the hub for Arab traders. I know that Byeokrando was a thriving port during the Goryeo dynasty, but I could not find any indication of 桂林 being associated with the Silla dynasty (I thought it was in China). Do you have any idea if there is any potential place called 桂林? I did manage to find Gyerim 鷄林, which was the old Silla kingdom palace site, but the name is not exactly the same, nor did I read anything about it being a center of commerce."

I do know Gyerim (presently Gyeongju - a port city) was a reference name for the Silla Kingdom was part of the Silk Road trading route known as the Marine Silk Road (boom in the late Tang Dynasty later continue to Song & Yuan Dynasty) especially that lead to Japan & will be the centre of commercial trade. Byeokrando (碧瀾渡) in Goryeo Dynasty was also part of the Marine Silk Road

It is the same with Korean in Joseon Dynasty will refer Beijing as Yeon Gyeong (Yanjing, 燕京).

I will put my bet on Gyerim than Guilin

History had it that Suro of Geumgwan Gaya married his Queen from India

There was a Persian poem "Kush Nama."  which shed new light on Silla's cultural exchanges with various other ancient nations hence evidence of a commercial trading & it contains the love story of a Silla princess and a Persian prince. 

http://m.korea.net/english/NewsFocus/Culture/view?articleId=141022

Currently there is a cultural show in Gyeongju depicting this persian poem

http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/ATR/SI_EN_3_2_2.jsp?cid=1992747

 

 

"2. The food served to the beggars were rice soup, kimchi and 賣飯. What is 賣飯 supposed to be, or is this yet another typo?"

Rice Soup will be Gukbap (국밥 literally hot soup with rice similar to 泡飯).....as for "賣飯" (mai fan) I suspect it is a multi grain & a poor man substitute for rice e.g. millet (Mae Jo Bap 메조밥 - an alternative grain to rice) although I can't find the nearest equivalent to the Chinese translation.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

Good reading...Thank you

"Gyeom did not reply. In the painting, the lotus flowers were awash with elegant colours, while a pair of mandarin ducks played leisurely nearby. The tip of Gyeom's brush breathed life to the leaves and stems with each stroke. After that, his brush dipped with thick ink, he added a verse in fine print at a corner of the painting.
      香遠益清 The further the distance, the purer the fragrance

* This is a verse from Sung Dynasty poem 愛蓮說 On the Love of Lotus

"香遠益清?" Having not seen his uncle draw for so long, Hoo was captivated by the verse in the painting.
"The further the fragrance is scattered, the clearer it is..." Gyeom's expression was obscure and abstruse.
The sounds of the geomungo finally died out and the lights in the courtyard dimmed. Only the clear fragrance of the lotus flowers in the painting remained, gradually growing stronger just like Gyeom's longing."

 

33586749040_0bab14f6fc.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

""I went to Ming, then Khmer (current day Cambodia), Tianzhu (current day India), before coming home."
"You are still as free-spirited as ever, traveling the world so freely whenever the urge strikes you.... only such is the life of a true man!"

The novel didn't mentioned the his adventure in Malacca where he met blue eyed Portuguese or the Straits Chinese (Baba & Nyonya) as depicted in the drama

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 Thank you for the fascinating read on the Silk Road trading route. I will take your word for it and change 桂林 to Gyerim accordingly - thank you! Thank you as well for sharing the video and write-up regarding Kush Nama. Do you have any intention on catching the performance during your forthcoming trip? In lieu of being physically there, I will definitely sit down and watch the video in its entirety. It is also interesting to learn that the Suro of Geumgwan Gaya's queen was an Indian princess, which would indicate that interracial marriages were not unheard of two thousand years ago in Korea. 

As for 賣飯, I wondered if it could actually be a typo for 麥飯. Is that even a proper term for Mae Jo Bap? In any case, i will change it to millet, since it sounds like the most plausible translation. Thank you!

I love the description in the novel of Gyeom's painting which was very evocative and poignant at the same time. However, on a visual level, I prefer the painting in the drama... to my novice eye, the addition of mandarin ducks somehow would have detracted from the verse which it was meant to depict.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

" Thank you for the fascinating read on the Silk Road trading route. I will take your word for it and change 桂林 to Gyerim accordingly - thank you! Thank you as well for sharing the video and write-up regarding Kush Nama. Do you have any intention on catching the performance during your forthcoming trip? In lieu of being physically there, I will definitely sit down and watch the video in its entirety. 

Not going to Gyeongju where the show is currently playing, besides you can watch the whole show on youtube. I knew of this show from an Arirang News segment

When I went to Gyeongju, the National Museum of Gyeongju had many foreign & silk road artifact excavated in Gyeongju.  There was a sunken Chinese trading ship discovered in 1975, near Sinan, Jeollanam-do Province. The ship, carrying trade goods produced on orders from the Kyoto area, sank on its way to Japan from Ningbo in Zhejiang Province, China in 1323. They excavated 30,000 maritime Silk Roads objects including celadon wears, coins, metal artifacts, medical artifacts & many other types of objects.

"As for 賣飯, I wondered if it could actually be a typo for 麥飯. Is that even a proper term for Mae Jo Bap? In any case, i will change it to millet, since it sounds like the most plausible translation. Thank you!"

I remember in Dae Jang Geum, a palace lady in the Seamstress department tries to steal Jang Geum's flour to make mandu for her soon to depart Sang-gung & fought over the flour because it was precious. In the end Jang Geum made the mandu for her after her sob story & in her competition she use Nappa cabbage leaves to make her mandu

I will put my money on Millet & if it is wheat (麥), it will be an expensive grain available only to the rich, flour for noodles in Joseon was made from rice or especially buckwheat or even mung bean

http://gwangjublog.com/millet-koreas-ancient-grain/

"It is also interesting to learn that the Suro of Geumgwan Gaya was an Indian princess, which would indicate that interracial marriages were not unheard of two thousand years ago in Korea. "

There is a 2010 MBC drama "Kim Su Ro - the Iron King" depicts Suro of Geumgwan Gaya & of course his Queen, the Indian Princess

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 Yes. The drama also had him going to Bangladesh, while the novel only sent him off to India :tongue: It was a shame they did not include Malacca as well, since the novel did specify that he retraced Zheng He's expedition route, which would definitely have seen him among the Peranakans and Portuguese.

Snuck a peek at the writeaup for "Kim Su Ro - the Iron King" - 32 episodes! The good thing is that it has Ji Sung and is available on Youtube so I might try it sometime.

Millet sounds right.... which then makes me wonder if I translated the grain Saimdang used to cook for the drifters during their first meeting wrongly, calling it wheatmeal, when it might have been millet after all. The novel calls the ingredient 米麥 and the meal 麥粥, which could perhaps refer to millet, and millet porridge? Does that then mean the meal for the beggars should be millet rice? Does that sound like a proper term?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

"Millet sounds right.... which then makes me wonder if I translated the grain Saimdang used to cook for the drifters during their first meeting wrongly, calling it wheatmeal, when it might have been millet after all. The novel calls the ingredient 米麥 and the meal 麥粥, which could perhaps refer to millet, and millet porridge? Does that then mean the meal for the beggars should be millet rice? Does that sound like a proper term?"

In the drama, I remember it was barley rice (bori ssal,보리쌀) for the drifters (page 32)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 Ahh... okay. It could be barley too I think... though I guess it would be barley porridge rather than rice, if I were to go by what the novel described.

It just occurred to me that the author has her dates confused. The opening datestamp of Chapter 24 says "1540, 35th year of Jungjong's reign". Yet in Jungjong's discussion with Gyeom, Jungjong was saying it would be 40 years next year since he ascended the throne. Since historically, he reigned from 1506 to 1544, there was no way to justify the 40-year statement. Hmm... 

However, I am glad that so far there is no Rubens' "Man in Korean Costume" thrown into the mix, since the year it was painted threw all logic out the window, making it almost impossible to have been depicting Gyeom, unless a supernatural explanation was provided. As it is, the lack of RADE activity makes me wonder if we will ever see that play out as well. 6 more chapters left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

"It just occurred to me that the author has her dates confused. The opening datestamp of Chapter 24 says "1540, 35th year of Jungjong's reign". Yet in Jungjong's discussion with Gyeom, Jungjong was saying it would be 40 years next year since he ascended the throne. Since historically, he reigned from 1506 to 1544, there was no way to justify the 40-year statement. Hmm... "

In the drama it was circa 1542 after Yi Gyeom travels.....We do know that Yi Gyeom will be in Goa in 1542 to witness St Francis Xavier's miracles & immortalise in Peter Paul Rubens painting 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 True that... though I am still hard pressed to see how Rubens could have depicted Gyeom so accurately that Saimdang would recognise him, since Rubens could not have seen him personally. 

And if the dialogue was accurate, which come to think of it, should be, seeing Gyeom travelled for 3 years, after being reunited with Saimdang following a 20-year separation. In which case, the year 1542-43 would have made sense, 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

"...... True that... though I am still hard pressed to see how Rubens could have depicted Gyeom so accurately that Saimdang would recognise him, since Rubens could not have seen him personally. "

that is just the penship of the scriptwriter.....remember,.....Yi Gyeom is a fictional character

As for Jungjong mentioning his reign as 40 years, maybe it is just a roundup figure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 Agreed about creative license. I don't mind as long as she ties everything together neatly in the end.

And it definitely sounds so much better to say one has seen 4 decade long changes, than 3 decades and 8 years... so much grander :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

Just look up "방갈라" presently Bangladeshi was known as Bengal at 1540-1542 will be under the Sur Empire (1540-1556 known as the period of Bengal Sultanate). In 1534, Portuguese was trading in Chittagong (port city) 

What lesson we still can learn from this drama

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@gerrytan8063 It is pretty amazing indeed - the things we learn sometimes just by picking on one small part of the drama. Truly a joy to still be able to discuss the drama and its details with you and @plainenglish even now!

Perhaps Gyeom saw the blue-eyed people in Bengal, not Malacca after all, though based on the Portuguese occupation timeframe of Malacca (1511 - 1641), Malacca could have well fit the brief as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liddi

"Perhaps Gyeom saw the blue-eyed people in Bengal, not Malacca after all, though based on the Portuguese occupation timeframe of Malacca (1511 - 1641), Malacca could have well fit the brief as well."

In the drama, Baba & Nyonya was mentioned distinctively although eventually Yi Gyeom will have to go to Goa 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_settlement_in_Chittagong

For reading

https://archive.org/details/HistoryOfThePortugueseInBengal

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notes on GMA7 (Philippines) broadcast of “Saimdang, Soulmates Across Time” Monday, August 28:

1. Episode opens with tail-end of Lee Gyeom and Hwieumdang’s confrontation, with Lee Gyeom realizing later on that Hwieumdang is the lowborn Seok Soon.

2. Episode ends with Zanjo and Anna seeing Prof. Min and his minions trying to force their way into the club.

3. Deleted scenes:

- Hu and the Biikdang staff trying to comfort Hyun-ryong as he tries to finish his poem and the painting

- Hwieumdang and Ji-gyoon congratulating each other for winning the contest

- Saimdang meeting Lee Gyeom at Biikdang and starting their search for Hyun-ryong

- Lee Gyeom and Hyun-ryong in a heart-to-heart talk about Hyun-ryong’s dreams for Saimdang

- Jillian preparing breakfast for Jason and her mother-in-law, and later she and Jason skipping school for that day

- Jillian’s mother-in-law finding out that Jason skipped school and arguing with Jillian as she spanks Jason

4. In the meeting between Prof. Min and the members of the committee trying to promote “Mount Geumgang” painting as a national treasure, GMA7 mixes the Filipino dialogues with English dialogues.

5. In two scenes,

(a) Zanjo confronting Prof. Min outside of Jillian’s apartment and quoting Confucius, and

(b) Zanjo reading the poem written on the “Mount Geumgang” painting,

Zanjo recites the original Korean (Chinese?) dialogue and then translates them into Filipino.

6. All the deleted scenes will jar anyone who has seen SLD (whether SBS or international version). But for someone who has not seen SLD, GMA7 does present a version that connects one scene to another:

For example, here’s one sequence:

Woo tells Saimdang about the “sound sticks,” and she finds lots of mulberry trees in the barren place.

Saimdang, Hyang, and Man Deuk (the paper artisan) have gathered mulberry tree branches and are returning to their workplace. Saimdang tells Hyang how she found Man Deuk.

Saimdang, Hyang, and Man Deuk finish their first batch of paper, and Saimdang’s children arrive with the dried persimmons from deposed Queen Shin.

Another sequence:

Hwieumdang drills Tae-ryong on the correct answer to the competition question.

Lee Gyeom finds out from a nervous Tae-ryong about the leakage.

Hyun-ryong and Tae-ryong refuse to pull the drawer. When Lee Gyeom asks why, they both tell about each other’s reason for wanting to enter Jungbu School.

Hyun-ryong prepares to go to school in his uniform, but the mothers arrive.

When Saimdang learns about Lee Gyeom’s involvement, she confronts him at Jungbu School.

And so, someone who watches GMA7’s broadcasts will have a basic understanding of what the story is all about.

But due to all the deleted scenes, the drama’s soul has disappeared, and the person who watches GMA7’s broadcasts will fail (intellectually and emotionally) to have a deep understanding of what this drama is all about.

GMA7’s chopped-up “Saimdang” broadcast is like “pandesal," the kind of ordinary bread that Filipinos eat for breakfast. Compared to GMA7’s broadcast, there’s the full-version SLD (whether SBS version or international) that’s like Black Forest cake with dozens of cherries on it or an overloaded Hawaiian pizza the size of a truck tire.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@plainenglish That is a lot of missing scenes... but am glad that GMA7 managed to maintain continuity despite all the slashes here and there. It is awesome that you are actively describing the nuances and missing scenes on Twitter, which would definitely help with the appreciation of the richness of the original work among the Filipino fans. Thank you! 

Incidentally. does GMA7 give equal emphasis to both timelines ala the international version, or a lopsided narrative leaning towards the Joseon timeline ala SBS? Do Filipino fans love the parallel narratives, or do they prefer it to be focused on one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, liddi said:

Incidentally. does GMA7 give equal emphasis to both timelines ala the international version, or a lopsided narrative leaning towards the Joseon timeline ala SBS? Do Filipino fans love the parallel narratives, or do they prefer it to be focused on one?

Just like the English-subbed international version. GMA7 gives equal emphasis to both timelines. You can see for yourself by watching the Filipino-dubbed videos of the August 29 episode; search Google for pinoy daily tv shows saimdang august 29 2017.

From the Twitter comments, viewers aren't confused by the shifts from timeline to timeline and are enjoying both narratives.

One cute comment posted after that tender scene between Saimdang and Hyun-ryong (after Hyun-ryong goes home from hiding in Biikdang) calls Saimdang as "Mommy Saimdang."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deleted scenes from GMA7’s “Saimdang” August 30 Wednesday broadcast:

- The Prime Minister badmouthing Min Chi-hyung before the King and asking that Min Chi-hyung be transferred to a position outside the Palace

- Min Chi-hyung conferring with a government minister and giving him a bribe

- Saimdang, Hyang, and some of the drifters on their way to deliver the 5,000 sheets of paper

- Saimdang pleading with the new store manager to honor the contract for 5,000 sheets of paper

- Lee Gyeom painting on a colored paper from Saimdang, asking all the Biikdang artists to create works of art with the rest of the colored paper, and later subtly encouraging the Biikdang staff to buy the rest of Saimdang’s paper

- Saimdang collapsing as she tries to leave the house at night and explain things with the drifters

Notes on GMA7’s “Saimdang” August 31 Thursday broadcast:

1. Episode begins with Hwieumdang preparing to go Bikdang in disguise.

2. Episode ends with Prof. Min and Chairman Seon planning to steal the "Mount Geumgang" painting.

3. Deleted scenes

- Police officers and their men arriving at Saimdang’s paper mill and arresting the drifters

- Saimdang negotiating with a minor police officer and distributing rice balls to the imprisoned drifters

- Saimdang guaranteeing to the Police Chief that the drifters will pay their unpaid taxes and that she can be arrested if any of the drifters try to escape

- The leader of the drifters and another drifter buying Goryeo paper from Hwieumdang’s paper store

- Saimdang cutting a piece of her father’s copy of the King’s poem and presenting it to old man Pal Bong, who confirms that it is genuine Goryeo paper from Unpyeongsa

- Lee Gyeom falling off his horse as he races back to Hanyang to see Saimdang

4. In previous episodes, GMA7's dialogues used "Shin Myung Hwa." But for the last two episodes, GMA7 has been using "Myung Hwa Shin."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From “Drama boosts sales of Saimdang books” at http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/culture/2017/01/142_222484.html

“In time with the much anticipated drama "Saimdang, Memoir of Colors," starring actress Lee Young-ae, which premiers Jan. 26 on SBS, the local publishing industry has released a series of books shedding fresh light on the historical figure, commonly known as the maternal icon of a "wise mother" to many here.

“Instead of the fixed image, the latest books, ranging from scholastic tomes to novels and children's books, strive to bring the unknown sides of the Joseon Kingdom figure Shin Saimdang (1504-1551), who was an artist, writer, calligrapher and poet, and the mother of renowned Korean Confucian scholar Yulgok Yi I.

“From late last year, when the drama was initially set to air with a simultaneous broadcast on China's Hunan TV, local publishers and academics have produced many books about Shin's life.”

9OkhE6i.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...