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What would you tell your 16 year old self?


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I'd tell myself stop being so shy. You're young only once- start living your life..people aren't any better than you! They are just as shy or anxious as you they just express it differently. 

Really, you should have lived life back then before work took over your life and gaining weight by just looking at food. If only you knew how skinny you were back then... 
 

Now, if I think of 53kg I laugh and keep eating, lol. 

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Don't be late to show your love, they will be gone immediately. Spend more time with your mother, keep your father with your own eyes so he wouldn't get lost, and right in your 20 just run to your love of life don't waste any seconds of it.

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NEVER, EVER, EVER LEAVE HOME AND STUDY ABROAD. You were unhappy but being unhappy isn't severe depression. You were happy and peaceful mostly. You weren't unhappy all the times anyway. You never even know what an actual depression is before you came here. Now, you're trapped. Now, you're depending your whole mental state, your life on a drama. You have forgotten how pure happiness feels like. Now, you aren't living anymore. You're just surviving.

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I'd tell myself that everything will work out relationship wise--that there are plenty of other fish in the sea and if he was too afraid to ask and too impatient to wait, then obviously he wasn't the one for you. I'd also tell myself that going to a private university all by myself in 2 years without any friends might've seem like a great way to escape all the senior year drama but not the best idea in the long run. 

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If I were to give my 16 year old self advice, I'd say: 

 

Don't stress over how others think of you.  Focus on yourself and work on building YOU.  You are unique and should not compare yourself to anyone else but you.  Relax a little and focus on what matters most.  Cherish every moment and make them count. 

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On 8/15/2014 at 7:14 PM, orangeman said:

A 16 year old adolescent with contempt for authority isn't going to listen to any advice from old people out to crush their world. I think the older Greeks enjoyed hubris, watching young men challenge a lion or lifting that five-ton marble column over their head. Our modern equivalent is recorded on Youtube and compiled for a marathon of binge scoffing.
Anything I list would rob that humbling experience of being wrong and reflecting on it. One needs to deal with the consequences of careless slander/rumors/gossip or long-term social impact of being a jerk by treating some as subhuman or inferior. Adolescence leaves a lot of kids with fantasies of striving to show off themselves come some hypothetical reunion in ten years or whenever, living in the shadow of their former self meanwhile. It's a confusing time for all exacerbated by pressure to be the one that succeeds. The best, the most ruthless, uncaring, self-driven person because that's the nature of our world, right? Not exactly but the distorted ideology of competition is alive and thriving.  Notepad++  Malwarebytes  FileZilla
Adults aren't so different from teenagers, only difference being money and autonomy. Same petty clique/group politics and conflicts, only worse because graduation is four decades away and moving away is not covered by the parents. Learning to interact with others no matter who they are (creed, class, ethnicity, etc) or what they do (lawyer, writer, comedian, machinist, etc) is something neglected in pursuit of nurturing the selfish ego. Can't place the blame on developing minds though--crappy "mature" role models beget crappy values. They might be able to handle the nuances of duplicity but the simple explicit guidelines will be misread by the inexperienced. I went into college with very sheltered views of the larger population beyond myself and am glad I was made aware of these flaws halfway through.
It's all a process that I feel needs to carry out without intervention. Cognitive dissonance, that jarring moment of consciousness, has to develop by itself and the mind needs to recognize when it is wrong. Advice should come in the form of conversations and maybe anecdotes that counteract the naive optimism indirectly, not as some sort of commandments or a do-instead list. This ideally preps leaders or just decent average people who can think for themselves, not socially dependent cogs who serve some nefarious goals like money or fame or immortality.
Summary: an richard simmons-kicking, physical or mental, is a wonderful thing

 

I would have told myself to party harder. 

 
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