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[Movie 2015] Memories of The Sword 협녀 : 칼의 기억


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  • 2 weeks later...


March 5, 2014
Jeon Do-yeon, debuting three films this year
Source: Donga via Hancinema.net
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The Queen of Cannes has started running again.
She's persistently busy with work and is expected to star in three consecutive movies this year.
Jeon Do-yeon starred in the martial arts movie "Memories of the Sword" which completed filming at the end of February. Even though she may be exhausted from non-stop action, she has chosen to move onto the next one without taking a break.
The next likely movie she'll act in is "Rouge" which is about a detective and a woman in the gang organization. She was offered a role in this during the making of "Memories of the Sword" and was positive about it.
She's currently taking in every possibility for the movie and is considering to make time in her schedule.
Jeon Do-yeon is a known actress who was awarded the Best Actress with the movie "Secret Sunshine" in Cannes and has been very careful about her work. She's become suddenly active and is looking at various movie genres.
The reason for Jeon Do-yeon's sudden change in route seems to be from the successful results of the movie "Way Back Home", a woman framed for transporting drugs and imprisoned in a foreign land; this successful movie gathered approximately 2 million viewers and proved the actress' box office dominance.

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March 16, 2014
Eun-gyo returns as a ‘Monster’Actress Kim Go-eun speaks about her latest film, her passion for acting
By Claire Lee The Korea Herald

Actress Kim Go-eun made an impressive breakthrough film debut back in 2012, with filmmaker Jung Ji-woo’s critically acclaimed sensual drama “Eungyo (A Muse).” The 22-year-old is best known by the name of her first-ever film character, Eungyo, a lively teenager who becomes the object of desire for a renowned elderly poet. 
Many expected her to continue her professional career after finishing “Eungyo” ― which received much attention for its subject matter and sexually explicit scenes ― and nabbing nine new actress awards for the role, including Blue Dragon and Grand Bell awards. Instead, she took a break and went back to Korea National University of Arts to finish her acting degree. After an almost two-year hiatus, Kim is returning to the big screen as a disabled woman who goes mad in the vicious thriller “Monster.”
“I was thinking, ‘Should I just do another film when I am receiving the most attention?’” said Kim in an interview with a small group of reporters on Friday. “And my conclusion was that I just couldn’t do it. So I just went back to school and participated in a play and made a short film. It was really great to work with my colleagues who are all so passionate about acting and cinema. I had a great six months, and I think I made the right decision.”
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Actress Kim Go-eun before an interview in Seoul. (Yoon Byung-chan/The Korea Herald)
Dressed in a simple, striped sweater and blue jeans, the actress was noticeably wobbly on her high heels, saying she “doesn’t normally” wear them. She did not hide her impish, curious nature, randomly commenting on an iPad keyboard and recording device while talking about her movies. 
“Does this recorder work as a radio, too?” she asked out of the blue in the middle of the interview.
In her latest film ― her second ― Kim stars as Bok-soon, a young woman whose younger sibling was murdered by a ruthless killer named Tae-soo (Lee Min-ki). The grieving woman has a developmental disability, and almost becomes psychotic when she learns that her sister is dead. With uncontrollable anger, madness and in spite of her mental disability, she plans her revenge. 
“I thought Bok-soon was sort of, I don’t know, cute when I first read the script,” Kim said, when asked what drew her to “Monster” and her character. “She was like some cartoon character. She has this developmental disability, but she’s simple and kind, loves her sister and is almost uncannily responsible. She’s spent her entire life selling vegetables in a market, so she’s very tough, and determined too. I thought it was interesting how such a character becomes this monster as she goes through a series of unfortunate events. I also liked the idea of a female character fighting against a serial killer.”
Aside from “Monster,” Kim also starred in director Park Heung-sik’s martial arts film “Hyeopnyeo” ― which is scheduled to be released in the second half of this year. Both of the films were very physically demanding, with rigorous training and intense fight scenes. But Kim is no stranger to physicality. She took dance lessons when she was a teenager, which helped her understand “what it means to express (oneself) using one’s body.”
“But I don’t think I enjoyed dancing,” Kim said. “Dancing requires tremendous dedication and it can be quite painful. I think those who dance in spite of all that do it because it somehow makes them happy. But it didn’t make me happy. Even when I was told that I was good at it, I just thought, ‘Okay, since I’m good at it, shouldn’t I be allowed to go home now?’ But with acting, no matter how hard it is, it makes me happy. It was really hard pulling off these fight scenes. At some point, I thought I was going to die because I was so exhausted. But once the shooting is done, all of that doesn’t really matter. I want to continue doing this.”
Filmmaker Jung Ji-woo, who discovered Kim for his film “Eungyo,” told The Korea Herald in 2012 that Kim is “naturally curious and brave,” and that he thinks it has to do with her upbringing. “She spent 10 years of childhood in China and did not experience the fierce competition of the Korean education system. She’s strong in the sense that she isn’t influenced easily. She doesn’t do things just because everyone else does it.”
Kim said she was shocked to find out that in Korean schools, students take physical education classes indoors, when she first moved back to Korea from China as a middle school girl. 
“I was even more shocked to learn that there was a textbook for physical education classes that you had to read,” she said. “My life in China was eventful. My family lived in the outskirts of Beijing, where you wouldn’t run into a lot of Koreans. I guess my way of thinking can be seen as somewhat peculiar, and maybe it has to do with my upbringing. I’m not sure. Whenever reporters said, ‘You must be feeling a lot of pressure as an emerging actress,’ I told them, ‘Not really. I get nothing good out of it.’ That was an honest answer and they were surprised. And now I feel like I should say I feel pressure not to look too weird.”
Kim decided to become an actress after participating in a small play while attending high school. It was a small role, without many lines, but playing the character enabled her to get a response from a live audience for the first time. 
“I am happy because I get to do what I love to do, what I always wanted to do,” she said. “But being an actress isn’t just about acting. You have to meet people, talk to people, and a lot of the times, it’s about being a team member. And I don’t think I necessarily knew about that. So I’ve been getting used to the non-acting work that I have to do (as an actress).”

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March 24, 2014
South Korean 'major' Lotte brings heavyweight lineup to HK market
by Nemo Kim Variety
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SEOUL — Lotte Entertainment may be South Korea’s number two film company, but it hates to be overshadowed by market leader CJ Entertainment.
The company has no lack of ambition or resources. It is part of a huge conglomerate that ranges from department stores and home shopping, through to international cinema management, film finance and production. Global singing sensation, Psy brought his “Gangnam Style” performance to Lotte’s 2012 Busan party – in the company’s own five star hotel!
With its 2014 FilMart slate, Lotte hopes to justify its billing as a major force in international film sales.
Its line-up at the Hong Kong event is headed by “The Fatal Encounter,” a period epic directed by Lee Jae-kyoo, a star TV drama producer (“The King 2 Hearts,” “Beethoven Virus”) and starring Hyun Bin. “Encounter” is Lee’s first feature as director, but given the Asia-wide popularity of Korean TV series, Lotte is counting on his TV track record to deliver audiences and rights sales inside Korea and out.
Lotte is also pitching another period epic in “Memories of the Sword,” with superstar Lee Byung-hun (“Masquerade,” “G.I. Joe”) and top actress Jeon Do-yeon (“Untold Scandal,” “The Housemaid”.) Directed by Park Heung-shik, who worked with Jeon in 1998 in “The Harmonium of My Memory”, the star-studded cast as well as the unusual setting of Goryeo Period, rather than the more familiar Choseon dynasty, has stirred interest in Korea.
The casting of Kim Go-eun of “The Muse” is an interesting counterpoint to the two more established talents. Kim also stars in “Monster,” a thriller that is also in the company’s FilMart lineup.
With both “Encounter” and “Sword” in post-production, buyers will have to be content with promo screenings at FilMart.
“We have not achieved our desired results lately, but we are confident that these large-scale period epics, with their star casts and talented directors, will turn things around,” said Eun-hye Byeon, senior manager of international sales at Lotte. “Our line-ups were rather limited in terms of genre up until now, but we have a much broader range on offer in Hong Kong. We expect this year’s FilMart to be the setting for a relaunch of Lotte.”
Around the corner, Lotte has two more expected blockbusters. “Pirates,” a period epic set during the Choseon dynasty and directed by Lee Seok-hoon, has particular resonance in Hong Kong this week – its star Kim Nam-gil, was named as rising star talent by the Asian Film Awards Academy on Sunday. The pic will get a promo screening at Cannes.
And in the second half of the year Lotte will debut “Tazza 2,” its long-awaited sequel to 2006 hit gangster action movie “Tazza: The High Rollers.”

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  • 2 weeks later...

@rubie, thank you so much for all that you offered here....  ^:)^ ^:)^ ^:)^


I was totally blown away by Kim Go-Eun's performance in "A Muse," and went looking for more, and came across this upcoming film.

This thread made a fabulous read for the afternoon..  What incredible cast... I look forward to "Memories of the Sword."

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Many thanks to @rubie for starting and faithfully updating this thread. Remiss of me not to thank her earlier - the producers are understandably being stingy with updates, stills etc.
@irilight - agree the cast looks incredible.  Hope BSB's role in the film isn't too small ... I smiled when I read what this blogger had to say when she wrote about Jeon De Jeon's being considered for a movie role:
http://www.kaedejun.com/2014/02/lee-jung-jae-jeon-yeon-reunite-in-rogue/

"Jeon is currently working on her film “Memories of the Sword,” a historical with Bae Soo Bin, Lee Byung Hun, and Kim Go Eun." 

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April 7, 2014
Big Presence for Korean Cinema at HK FilMartKOFIC and More Out in Front at Asia’s Leading Film Market

by Pierce Conran KOFIC
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Taking place over March 24th to 27th, the Hong Kong International Film & Television Market (FilMart) was once again buzzing with the latest Asian tentpoles as sellers, buyers and agencies littered the market floor. Taking place along with the Hong Kong Asian Film Financing Forum (HAF) and held concurrently with the Asian Film Awards (AFAs) and the Hong Kong International Film Festival (HKIFF), HK FilMart is a large, annual event that features many visitors from all sectors of the film field. Led by the Korean Film Council (KOFIC), Korean cinema, as usual, had a large presence at the event, with umpteen companies representing the country and some particularly visible projects catching buyers’ eyes. As in previous years, KOFIC operated an umbrella stand near the center of the market floor, allowing for various visual effects companies, festivals, project markets and film commissions to have a presence at the market. Among the prominent VFX companies under the KOFIC stand this year were Dexter Studios, which had an animatronic gorilla head from last year’s Mr. Go for visitors to play with, and Macrograph. KOFIC’s PARK Jin-hae, the Manager for Festival and Markets (Asia & North America), mentioned that six more Korean companies were present at FilMart this year. Though fielding a great deal of questions relating to all aspects of the Korean film industry, PARK revealed that “one of the major questions I was asked this year was about our location incentive program.” Seoul is currently being used as a major filming location in the upcoming blockbuster Avengers: Age of Ultron, a project which availed of KOFIC’s incentive. However, a lot of questions she received were also inquiries about the major Korean sales companies, which PARK explained “were so busy this year they would barely have time to get lunch.” Major sellers included CJ Entertainment, Showbox/Mediaplex, Finecut Inc., and Lotte Entertainment. One of the most popular Korean booths this year was Finecut Inc., which boasted an impressive lineup that encompassed both lauded arthouse films such as YEON Sangho’s The Fake and LEE Su-jin’s Han Gong-ju and enticing commercial fare such as Sea Fog, which is being produced by Bong Joon Ho. Along with The Attorney, LEESONG Hee-il’s Night Flight, which screened at the Hong Kong International Film Festival, Red Family and KIM Ki-duk’s Meobius, all these films announced sales just ahead of FilMart. Manning one of the biggest stands this year was Lotte Entertainment, which, in addition to its recent films Plan Man, Hot Young Bloods, Venus Talk and Monster, featured their upcoming period film The Fatal Encounter front and center. Buyers were given the opportunity to view a 20-minute promotional reel of the HYUN Bin-starring drama. Lotte also featured upcoming period action film Pirates, the late year period epic Memories of the Sword, JANG Jin’s comeback High Heels and the grifter sequel Tazza 2 on its sales slate for the rest of the year. As usual, Showbox/Mediaplex operated a busy booth as they delighted buyers with an extended clip/trailer of their upcoming period action film Kundo: The Age of the Rampant, which stars HA Jung-woo and GANG Dong-won. The outfit also drummed up some interest in their upcoming thriller A Hard Day, due out next month. The Divine Move, an upcoming gambling drama starring JUNG Woo-sung, was also on show. CJ Entertainment may not have drawn quite the same interest it did when its stand was shopping Snowpiercer last year, but it nevertheless drew plenty of attention for its wide slate of films, which includes next month’s The Target, their current drama Thread of Lies and their summer tentpole Roaring Currents, a period naval warfare drama with CHOI Min-sik from director KIM Han-min. Other companies present at FilMart with interesting projects included M-Line, which is handling international sales on the North Korean refugee drama Apostle, which was recently screened at the United Nations, and the upcoming Mourning Grave, a summer horror release that will mark the feature length debut of OH In-chun, a promising genre short filmmaker. United Pictures, a joint venture between BK Pictures, Opus Pictures and Zip Cinema, manned a booth and put forth their upcoming genre titles Big Match, starring LEE Jung-jae and SHIN Ha-gyun, and the thriller For the Emperor with LEE Min-ki. Serving as the unofficial end of this year’s HK FilMart was the ceremony for the 8th Asian Film Awards (AFAs), which were held in nearby Macao. Numerous Korean films were nominated at the event, including Snowpiercer, which was recognized in the Best Film, Director, Screenplay, Production Design and Costume Design categories. Also heavily nominated were The Attorney, which had contenders in three acting categories (Best Actor, SONG Kang-ho; Best Newcomer, IM Si-wan; Best Supporting Actress, KIM Young-ae), and Cold Eyes, which was nominated for Best Actress (HAN Hyo-joo), Best Supporting Actor (JUNG Woo-sung) and in technical fields such as Best Cinematography and Best Editor. At the awards themselves, SHIN Min-kyung earned an award for Best Editing for her work on Cold Eyes while JUNG Sung-in picked up the Best Visual Effects prize for Mr. Go. Along with the nominees, many Korean film figures were present at the awards, including JEON Do-yeon, star of Secret Sunshine (2007) and Way Back Home, who served as Korea’s ambassador at the AFAs, and LEE Yong-kwan, the director of the Busan International Film Festival, who was part of the jury panel and organizing committee. In addition to all the activities at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center (HKCEC), where FilMart took place, Korean films were also prominent on the lineup for the 38th HKIFF, which took place across the bay in Kowloon. Night Flight and LEE Yong-seung’s 10 Minutes were among the new features on display, while Bong Joon Ho’s Mother (2009) was screened in a newly released black and white cut. Two new shorts from directors KANG Je-gyu and JUNG Woo-sung also appeared in the HKIFF commissioned omnibuses Beautiful 2014 and Three Charmed Lives, respectively. By Pierce Conran

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  • 3 weeks later...

 What a surprise from LBH DC sharing <3
Not sure the actual source (anyone knows?) but here's a clear image Lee Byung Hun's appearance as Deok Gi in the upcoming 'Memories of the Sword'. Looking really good! thumbup.gif
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memories_of_the_sword.jpgComment at LBH DC (thanks to mistymorning for the translation)
- story is well-woven- no character without story and just watching their relationship bloom would be the major fun - sword fighting will be good, fitting for the best sword man/woman of the age- production cost is 100 billion won (USD10 million)

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Guest adikkeluangman

[TRANS] HIGH CUT Japan Special Edition with 2PM - April 2014
image
c: okniverse.net
Q: Junho, have you finished filming the movie 'Memoirs of the Sword', which you worked together with Lee Byunhun and Jeon Doyeon?Junho: This movie was a very good learning experience for my growth. Whether it's the historical drama plot or the swordsman practice classes, it was very difficult for me hence it became a challenge. Both Lee Byunghun and Jeon Doyeon sunbae-nims helped me a lot. We talked/discussed a lot about the character's thoughts, point of view and what kind of feelings/expression the character would like to display. If I were to think about it on my own, I would only be able to see from a certain perspective, which would restrict/hinder my acting. But thanks to the seniors' advice, I feel that my performance/acting have been widened. 

Taken out with full credits: Jap > Chn: 卓儿Vanchel (weibo)Chn > Eng: myboytaec
Here is Junho acting thread.

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Guest adikkeluangman

Junho as Yool in Memories of the Sword via faces_places_ ©.e347oi.jpg
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The first picture dated on 20 February with caption
D-1 and the second is recent more like on post-production process.. 
Looks like this person is the crew or working for this movie. She posted more pictures of the movie scenery and some stuff in her instagram. But I could not tell the faces.

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May 7, 2014
Representing Korea to the WorldSpotlight on Korean Film Festivals in Sydney, Paris, Florence and London by June KIM KOFIC

Related excerpt only

Are there any unique aspects to your film festival that you’d like to introduce to our readers? 

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JUNG: Our festival is special in the way that its outreach power is very dynamic. It covers all of Australia’s large cities and so instead of calling it the Sydney Korean Film Festival, we are able to call ourselves the Korean Film Festival in Australia. Even other film festivals in Australia visit only one or two cities for their event, and none are as extensive as our festival. We offer the same quality films we’ve selected to each city, the difference is the dates and length of the event. Unfortunately we are only able to bring guests to our Sydney portion of the festival. YOO: What makes us different is that we’re a private organization run by regular people. We’re just film lovers who look to program great films with a unique perspective.
We also strive to build relationships with the local Korea and Asian film fan communities. There is consistent communication with these groups as our team itself is made out of fans from such groups. Not only are they the main source of our audience, but they’re also part of our core team. I think this is the reason why we have a very specific and unique atmosphere at our festival.
K.inema, which was put together 2012, works as a sales and distribution medium that was introduced at our festival. Films we’ve programmed will be recommended to other festivals in France and also for cultural activities. We’re happy to say that they have been getting better results every year. CHANG: With 50 or so Korean features and shorts every year, it is not an event just for Koreans overseas, but for local Italian filmgoers as well. It is a source to introduce Korea to the world and with an exciting new showcase for each festival, we try our best to give a better understanding of Korean cinema to our audiences and to introduce renowned filmmakers and actors as well. JEON: I think the festival speaks for itself, as it faces its 9th year in one of the world’s four largest film markets. In the beginning, most of our viewers were film professionals and art film fans, but nowadays our audiences range from those interested in commercial flicks, indie films and shorts, showing that the variety in Korean films are attracting many different filmgoers. We’re currently the biggest Korean film festival in the world, and I believe we’ve assisted the expansion of Korean film festivals in Europe. Is there an unforgettable moment from your previous editions you’d like to share?
JUNG: There was a screening in 2011 when a HDCAM failed to display subtitles. We were quick to apologize to our viewers and reimburse tickets for the screening. It still gives me shivers when I think of that moment! YOO: There are too many special moments during these last eight years. We were devastated when we couldn’t put together enough funds to start the festival for the very first edition. It was hard, but just as memorable. When we finally received help from KOFIC, when we filled up our theatre, when we first invited a director (SONG Il-gon), when we first became a private company, or when I watched the opening film of last year’s festival – the firsts never seem to escape me.
One particular event that was most memorable though was during YOON Sung-hyun’s Bleak Night (2011) screening. I noticed director Jean-Pierre Dardenne exit after the screening. CHANG: It was breathtaking to see a theatre with both floors full, and excited audiences with shining eyes, just waiting for the screening to start. Most of the viewers were Italian and it made me so proud that they were waiting for our films. JEON: At the 7th edition, the closing night film Masquerade was attended by Bruce Willis, Helen Mirren, and John Malkovich, along with 20 or so Hollywood stars. Having them on the red carpet to watch the screening and recognizing the importance of Korean films was definitely a memorable moment for the festival. Are there any upcoming releases that you’re looking out for? 

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JUNG: I’m very curious about LEE Byung-hun and JEON Do-yeon leading Memories of the Sword, to be released this year. It’ll be a big hit with the Australian audiences, perhaps even more than Masquerade!
 JEON: I’m also curious about Memories of the Sword, and also The Fatal Encounter, Kundo: Age of the Rampant, and Roaring Currents as we look forward to programming a special section for period films at our 9th edition. Last but not least, what does Korean film mean to you?
JUNG: It’s an effective medium that ties Australians and Koreans by creating a common space. YOO: For our festival, each film is in and of itself, a piece of art. CHANG: Korean films give Koreans confidence and pride. JEON: Korean films are our pride. KOFIC supports Korean cultural events that involve the screening of Korean films. They must be global and feature competitive programming, while the event’s main goal should be to expose Korean culture and/or aid in developing the Korean film industry. Eligible events must be annual, should be unique in their region, and must be at least five days long. By June KIM KOFIC

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Guest adikkeluangman

From the movie stunt coordinator: #준호 #Junho's stuntman in movie Memories of the Sword협녀)

준호는 남자가봐도정말 멋진 녀석이야

— 이태영 (@lty9587)

May 13, 2014
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May 15, 2014.Leading Korean Studios Bring Enticing Market.Nemo Kim Variety.com
In contrast to South Korea’s anemic festival presence, things are much brighter on the market side. The big three — CJ, Lotte and Showbox — have plenty to shout about.
CJ E&M brings Un Certain Regard screener “A Girl at My Door,” helmed by July Jung and produced by Lee Chang-dong, and “The Target,” a remake of French “Point Blank” by helmer Chang, to the Croisette. CJ is also screening “No Tears for the Dead,” helmed by Lee Jeong-beom (“The Man From Nowhere”), and historical maritime epic “Roaring Currents,” directed by Kim Han-min. CJ will also show a 3D omnibus film “Mad, Sad, Bad” by three well-known names in the Korean industry, Ryoo Seung-wan (“No Blood, No Tears”), Han Ji-seung (“Papa”) and Kim Tae-yong (“Late Autumn”).
Lotte’s Cannes lineup includes “The Pirates,” an epic set in 14th century Korea; another historical piece, “The Fatal Encounter,” about a murderous plot in the royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty; “Memories of the Sword,” a Joseon period drama about revenge; “Man on High Heels,” about a cold-blooded detective who secretly desires a sex change; and “Manhole,” which features a serial killer who uses the sewer system to abduct his victims.
Showbox’s lineup includes: “A Hard Day,” a thriller about a detective who buries his car accident victim in the same coffin as his mother; historical epic “Kundo: Age of the Rampant”; “Gangnam Blues,” introduced at the Hong Kong FilMart; “The Divine Move,” a noir actioner about professional gamblers; and “We Are Brothers,” a comedy about a Korean-born American adoptee who finds his biological family.
On the independent side, Finecut has a pair of new titles backed by distributor NEW, and Indiestory has short film “Breath” in the Cinefondation section.

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May 19, 2014
New JEON Do-yeon Thriller Gets Underway in June
A BASTARD Co-Stars KIM Nam-gil
by Pierce Conran KOFIC
Screen siren JEON Do-yeon is currently serving jury duty at the Cannes Film Festival and when she returns to Korea she will begin production on the new thriller A Bastard, which will see her star alongside KIM Nam-gil. JEON will play a murder suspect’s wife who becomes attracted to the detective investigating her lover. The detective, played by KIM, finds himself caught between his own feelings for the woman and his duties and instincts as a law enforcer. The film will be directed by OH Seung-uk, who co-wrote the 90s Korean classics Green Fish (1997) and Christmas in August (1998) but hasn’t helmed a film since his 2000 debut Kilimanjaro. JEON most recently appeared in PANG Eun-jin’s Way Back Home and recently finished filming Memories of the Sword, a period epic that will see her co-star with LEE Byung-hun. KIM Nam-gil will also appear in a period film this year, the swashbuckler The Pirates. His role was originally offered to LEE Jung-jae, who was forced to drop out of the project following an injury sustained on the set of upcoming thriller Big Match. A Bastard, which is being produced by Sanai Pictures and will be financed and distributed by CJ Entertainment, will go before cameras in June..

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Variety_zpsab63cb21.jpg May 16, 2014
Jeon Do-yeon Joins Kim Nam-gil in Thriller ‘A Bastard’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Patrick FraterAsia Bureau Chief Variety.com
jeon-do-yeon.jpg?w=670&h=377&crop=1
Jeon-Do-yeonPascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Cannes competition jury member Jeon Do-yeon has been cast in thriller “A Bastard.”
She will star opposite male star Kim Nam-gil (“Pirates”).
The story involves a detective who falls for the girlfriend of the murderer he is investigating.
Kim is white-hot after a string of TV shows including “School 1,” “Queen Seonduk” and “Bad Guy” and ahead of big-budget seafaring actioner “Pirates.” Production of “A Bastard” will start shortly.
“A Bastard” (which previously went under the title “Rouge”) is fully financed by CGV Collage, the arthouse offshoot of CJ Entertainment’s exhibition division CJ-CGV. International sales will be handled by CJ Entertainment.
Jeon is the only Korean actor to have won a major prize at Cannes: She won the Palme d’Or in 2007 for “Secret Sunshine.”
Jeon will next be seen in “Memories of the Sword,” in which she plays a blind Joseon-era swordswoman alongside Lee Byung Hun (“G.I. Joe”) and Kim Go Eun.

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Guest adikkeluangman

We got new picture from the crew on location. How I wish that Junho in this group picture too. Looks like Lee Byung Hoon and Jeon Do Yeon in their movie outfit. Fans found this because the crew tag Junho name but he not in the picture... Well...
[c]BoztXsJIAAAhO7r.jpg

@rubie, I saw that you LOL-ed the tweet. Junho got some appeal for man. Not sure if you follow movie Cold Eyes promotion round. Jung Woo Sung and the director take good care of Junho although Han Hyo Joo is right there. And we anticipate to see Junho and Lee Byung Hoon interaction during the promo round. :) 

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^ Wow @adikkeluangman, that is one awesome sharing when we're so deprived from the movie goodies.. not to mention the release way waaayyy down in December. A super-long time to wait. Thanks so much for the highlight, for sure there will be pics with Junho included soon. So far, I think most photo-sharing had been from the young actor/his fans.
I didn't follow Cold Eyes for some reason but Junho I've read made a great impression in the movie. I think if he was "closer to Han Hyo Joo.. you know, people will start rumor-ing. ^^ But Byunghun is definitely a senior who'd be a good teacher/friend/hyung to young actors, especially. We'd be sure to have lots of articles and mention of them both in related interviews once the promos start.
Hope you can share the photo at LBH thread, too.. or I can quote you on this, of course. Such a cool fabulous treat.

Anyway, hope you won't take this the wrong way. LBH's name is Lee Byung Hun/Heon and not Hoon. That would be the name of the famous PD Lee Byung Hoon (Dong Yii, Dae Jang Geum).They sound the same but Hun and Hoon have different characters. I apologize for this, kinda silly rubie's pet peeve when it comes to LBH. Hope you would understand. Kak rubie minta maaf, ya.

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