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Su Ae 수애 | Soo AE


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Guest boroangel

Skimmed through A Family....in like less than 5 mins......and its another sob story.......geez......sometimes can really make you depressed....April Kiss although I suspect towards the end might have some of the usual tragedy stuff......doubt it will be as sad as Love Letter......as for Merry Go Round......it really is more light-hearted I think......the relationship between Su Ae and her co-star is kinda like more innocent and less heavy.....think her sis is the one who suffers more heartache?

Both April Kiss and Merry Go Round seem to have some comedy elements....which is good.....too much sad stuff can make you really depressed...

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Latest should be last year since this year she has been out of action most of the time     Anyway, it has been confirmed that Soo Ae will be taking up the role in an upcoming movie "High Soc

This has been her agency for 18 years and she left once in 2013 and returned in 2015. I thought she would stay there forever. I don't know whether to be happy or sad about this news. Since the second

Ok my guess, maybe I'm wrong ..... the house decorations looks like Vietnamese, so must be taken when she was filming Sunny in Vietnam long time ago.   There's a lot of new drama castings bu

as many have said, she's a tremendously talented actress... simply wonderful to watch onscreen. pictures do her no justice, imo.

ok, so some of you may not find her pretty, or think she looks "typical" Korean... but i think that's one of the best things about her. she has this natural, graceful look to her, and once you watch her onscreen, you'll be taken by her beauty too.

Yes. I agree. People don't find her pretty by these pictures, but they really do her no justice! Lol. Who cares if she isn't the most beautiful actress out there? At least she can act, right?

I loved her in 'Love Letter' and 'A Family.' Those are probably my faves of her. 'Carousel' was also good. There are some actresses who are not so appealing onscreen. However, I find Su Ae so appealing onscreen. lol. She has this thing about her that does not make her look annoying :lol:

Anyways, thanks for posting so many pictures!

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Guest siCKako

a review of Wedding Campaign..i think it'll be shown in Korea 23rd of Nov. ;)

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Wedding Campaign

Having your debut film presented as the closing film at the 10th Pusan International Film Festival is quite a feat, but Hwang Byung-kuk's Wedding Campaign was definitely deserving of the venue. Wedding Campaign is a pleasant mainstream film that well demonstrates where South Korean cinema is headed if things continue to go well and South Korean cinema continues to push itself as it has here. The story revolves primarily around Hong Man-taek (Jung Jae-young - Guns & Talk, Someone Special), a 38-year old farmer who has yet to find a wife, much to the anguish of his mother (Kim Ji-yeong, who won a Grand Bell Award for her role in Invited Guests, was in Lovers of Woomook-baemi, and recently Arahan ) and his own disappointment. Knowing his opportunities are limited in their village, his grandfather (Kim Seong-gyeom - Fool Hunting, The Last Present) learns of an organization that assists Korean men in finding Korean-Uzbek women to marry. His best friend Hee-chul (Yu Jun-sang - Nightmare, Tell Me Something) is also single and encourages his friend to take the trip by going along with him. Arriving in Uzbekistan, Hee-chul's Casanova facade helps him initially but eventually he begins to believe his lies and loses what he could have had, while Man-taek's pathological insecurities around women make him quite undesirable. Man-taek's translator, Kim Lara (Soo Ae) realizes her work is cut out for her and the extreme pressure from her boss doesn't make turning Man-taek into an acceptable mate all that much easier.

Now, if whatever sound you make inside your head whenever someone says something surprising erupted reflexively when I mentioned Korean-Uzbeks, the film lays out the history around that divergence in the Korean diaspora in an expository moment. And since I didn't write all that history down when I saw it during the press screening at PIFF, I'll leave it to the film to explain how this significant number of Koreans ended up in this part of Central Asia. I'll just say that it does not have to do with the "1.5 generation" of the late 80's and early 90's. It has a much longer history than that. Placing this film in Uzbekistan is one of the significant achievements of this film. Completing such a quality production in such a challenging locale demonstrates the rapid maturation of the South Korean film industry and the success of initiatives taken on by the industry to assist and encourage such endeavors.

Equally impressive is the fact that the film's narrative does not fully rely on cliches into which this type of film might fall. The need for these villagers to seek wives elsewhere is tied up nicely with import/export policies in South Korea and South Korea's drastic population shift to urban centers. But the plight of these men is not all the narrative is concerned with, for we also get more than a glimpse of the experiences of these Korean-Uzbek women and other women who are unfortunate to live in areas of economic desolation. The film more than hints at the economic and political dynamics involved in this type of scenario, much more than one would expect from a mainstream film.

But it is a mainstream film and it indeed entertains in the areas of comedy and melodrama with some nice circularity in themes, particularly the scenes where characters have to run away from the authorities. Jung and Yu present believable characterizations. Jung's paralysis and naivete is wonderfully paced and you just want to slap Yu, as is the intended reaction to his character. However, most impressive is Soo. I know she has had TV work well before her debut in A Family last year, but she is excellent here as the Korean-Uzbek translator/matchmaker. Only her second film, she does not deserve her 'rising star' status for she's already convinced me she's a full-fledged star, capable of whatever challenges directors throw her way.

With strong performances, an exciting international location, a pleasant narrative with enough twist and turns to avoid complete predictability, Wedding Campaign is a wonderful example of the campaign that South Korea continues to engage in concerning its film industry. It demonstrates not how South Korea is the next Hong Kong or next Hollywood, but how it is simply South Korea. The South Korean film industry is comfortable in her own skin and has nothing to prove to anyone else but herself. Kinda like the place you need to be personally to find your soul mate.

reviewed by: Adam Hartzell

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Guest siCKako

^ur welcome :D

her latest commercial...

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review of Wedding Campaign..i think it'll be shown in Korea 23rd of Nov.

--------------

Wedding Campaign

Having your debut film presented as the closing film at the 10th Pusan International Film Festival is quite a feat, but Hwang Byung-kuk's Wedding Campaign was definitely deserving of the venue. Wedding Campaign is a pleasant mainstream film that well demonstrates where South Korean cinema is headed if things continue to go well and South Korean cinema continues to push itself as it has here. The story revolves primarily around Hong Man-taek (Jung Jae-young - Guns & Talk, Someone Special), a 38-year old farmer who has yet to find a wife, much to the anguish of his mother (Kim Ji-yeong, who won a Grand Bell Award for her role in Invited Guests, was in Lovers of Woomook-baemi, and recently Arahan ) and his own disappointment. Knowing his opportunities are limited in their village, his grandfather (Kim Seong-gyeom - Fool Hunting, The Last Present) learns of an organization that assists Korean men in finding Korean-Uzbek women to marry. His best friend Hee-chul (Yu Jun-sang - Nightmare, Tell Me Something) is also single and encourages his friend to take the trip by going along with him. Arriving in Uzbekistan, Hee-chul's Casanova facade helps him initially but eventually he begins to believe his lies and loses what he could have had, while Man-taek's pathological insecurities around women make him quite undesirable. Man-taek's translator, Kim Lara (Soo Ae) realizes her work is cut out for her and the extreme pressure from her boss doesn't make turning Man-taek into an acceptable mate all that much easier.

Now, if whatever sound you make inside your head whenever someone says something surprising erupted reflexively when I mentioned Korean-Uzbeks, the film lays out the history around that divergence in the Korean diaspora in an expository moment. And since I didn't write all that history down when I saw it during the press screening at PIFF, I'll leave it to the film to explain how this significant number of Koreans ended up in this part of Central Asia. I'll just say that it does not have to do with the "1.5 generation" of the late 80's and early 90's. It has a much longer history than that. Placing this film in Uzbekistan is one of the significant achievements of this film. Completing such a quality production in such a challenging locale demonstrates the rapid maturation of the South Korean film industry and the success of initiatives taken on by the industry to assist and encourage such endeavors.

Equally impressive is the fact that the film's narrative does not fully rely on cliches into which this type of film might fall. The need for these villagers to seek wives elsewhere is tied up nicely with import/export policies in South Korea and South Korea's drastic population shift to urban centers. But the plight of these men is not all the narrative is concerned with, for we also get more than a glimpse of the experiences of these Korean-Uzbek women and other women who are unfortunate to live in areas of economic desolation. The film more than hints at the economic and political dynamics involved in this type of scenario, much more than one would expect from a mainstream film.

But it is a mainstream film and it indeed entertains in the areas of comedy and melodrama with some nice circularity in themes, particularly the scenes where characters have to run away from the authorities. Jung and Yu present believable characterizations. Jung's paralysis and naivete is wonderfully paced and you just want to slap Yu, as is the intended reaction to his character. However, most impressive is Soo. I know she has had TV work well before her debut in A Family last year, but she is excellent here as the Korean-Uzbek translator/matchmaker. Only her second film, she does not deserve her 'rising star' status for she's already convinced me she's a full-fledged star, capable of whatever challenges directors throw her way.

With strong performances, an exciting international location, a pleasant narrative with enough twist and turns to avoid complete predictability, Wedding Campaign is a wonderful example of the campaign that South Korea continues to engage in concerning its film industry. It demonstrates not how South Korea is the next Hong Kong or next Hollywood, but how it is simply South Korea. The South Korean film industry is comfortable in her own skin and has nothing to prove to anyone else but herself. Kinda like the place you need to be personally to find your soul mate.

reviewed by: Adam Hartzell

-----------

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Guest boroangel

a review of Wedding Campaign..i think it'll be shown in Korea 23rd of Nov. ;)

-----------

Awwwwwwwww great.......and I was initially supposed to go there on the 24th Nov..... :(

Sounds like a very good movie with an interesting storyline......saw the trailer and its more of a comedy....a good change from the usual weepy stuff.......

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My favorite actress! I'd love to see her act again with Jo Hyun Jae. They've got chemistry!

Jess, we have something in common besides Andy!

To be honest, I didn't even know who she was before Love Letter. I read the synopsis of the drama in another forum and was touched by the story. But when I saw the acting of the three leads, the drama immediately became one of my favourite. Soo Ae was so convincing in her role as the tragic orphan caught between two men, one who loves her deeply while the other who loves God deeply.

That's pretty much all, I would love to see "My Family" cause I heard she did a superb job in there, but I've yet to buy the dvd. I know she's done some other works as well, but I haven't seen them besides what I've listed above.

She was spectacular in A Family... especially towards the end when she was trying to go to her father. All I can say is be prepared with boxes of tissues.

^ So is the soundtrack for Love Letter. I was addicted to the song by "Tri-be"...hehe.

A Farewell to Heaven is a really sad song... I watched the MV over and over again when I was addicted to the drama. I also like Sarangeul Midnayo. The song is sssooo moving and hearing it makes me sad everytime.

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Guest boroangel

Jess, we have something in common besides Andy!

To be honest, I didn't even know who she was before Love Letter. I read the synopsis of the drama in another forum and was touched by the story. But when I saw the acting of the three leads, the drama immediately became one of my favourite. Soo Ae was so convincing in her role as the tragic orphan caught between two men, one who loves her deeply while the other who loves God deeply.

She was spectacular in A Family... especially towards the end when she was trying to go to her father. All I can say is be prepared with boxes of tissues.

A Farewell to Heaven is a really sad song... I watched the MV over and over again when I was addicted to the drama. I also like Sarangeul Midnayo. The song is sssooo moving and hearing it makes me sad everytime.

Actually the whole soundtrack is good......my favourite (just edging out the rest) is geu gyuh ool eh gi uk - Kim Eun Hee.

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I like her because she doesn't always play your helpless feminine role. I mean in A Family, she played an ex-gangster.

I think ... would she be the younger Lee Na Young for putting strong female roles? In Hae Shin, she overcomes her previous master (well mistress... but yea)

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