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Su Ae 수애 | Soo AE


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hehe..she's pretty..like her frm Loveletter wif Jo Hyun Jae..hehe...she kinda reminds me of Choi Yuh Jin a bit tho..hehe

Isn't Choi Yuh Jin her sister? That's what I heard and they do look alike.

I, too, hope that she'll do another drama with Jo Hyun Jae...I love Love Letter. She is, by far, my favorite actrsess. I love her natural look and unique voice. She is so underrated but stands out so much compared to all the other made-up actresses who all had a little "help" here and there.

Sicako, you still haven't started a thread on her in the drama section...hehe.

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Latest should be last year since this year she has been out of action most of the time     Anyway, it has been confirmed that Soo Ae will be taking up the role in an upcoming movie "High Soc

This has been her agency for 18 years and she left once in 2013 and returned in 2015. I thought she would stay there forever. I don't know whether to be happy or sad about this news. Since the second

Ok my guess, maybe I'm wrong ..... the house decorations looks like Vietnamese, so must be taken when she was filming Sunny in Vietnam long time ago.   There's a lot of new drama castings bu

as many have said, she's a tremendously talented actress... simply wonderful to watch onscreen. pictures do her no justice, imo.

ok, so some of you may not find her pretty, or think she looks "typical" Korean... but i think that's one of the best things about her. she has this natural, graceful look to her, and once you watch her onscreen, you'll be taken by her beauty too.

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dude i love her!!! and although she may look plain and such she acts FFFRRRIIICCCKKKKKEEENNNN GOOOOODDDD for ur info and she has something calles MAE LEUK something not alot of actresses have!! <_<:angry:

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Guest boroangel

Thanks....I am finally a member.....and I LOVE SU AE so much...after Love Letter...will explain how I came to liek her but I was wondering....how come theres no official thread on her?

You know..some official thread where we can post pictures and news on her....welcome all fans who like her...would be great if we can have those who can read korean....cos some sites and updates of her news are all in korean.....are thee liek fan clubs of her around......u know...anything about her.....or should I start one first?

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Guest .:Angela:.

she isnt the prettiest girl but you cant say she's ugly.. her acting is amazing, whenever she "cries" it's soo believable!! that's why i'll always like her =]

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Guest boroangel

SU AE 수애

suae10tr.jpg

Profile

Birth Name: Park Su-Ae

Chinese Name: 朴秀愛

Date of Birth: July 25th, 1980

Height: 168cm

Weight: 46kg

Vital Stats: 33-24-35

Hobbies: Swimming, Pocket Ball (Pool)

Debut: 2002.06.28

Fan Club: ??? Anyone knows where to end her letters?

Drama

KBS : Emperor of the Sea (2004)

http://www.kbs.co.kr/drama/jangbogo

KBS : April Kiss (2004)

http://www.kbs.co.kr/drama/kiss/

MBC : Merry-Go-Round / Carousel (2003)

http://www.imbc.com/broad/tv/drama/horse/

MBC : Love Letter (2003)

http://www.imbc.com/tv/drama/loveletter/

MBC : The Maengs Success Period (2002)

http://www.imbc.com/tv/drama/maeng/

MBC : Yeob gi Bal Ral Hong Seon Saeng (2002)

MBC : Jak Sarang (2002)

Movies

Wedding Campaign (2005)

http://movie.naver.com/search/movie.php?code=C9441

A Family (2004)

http://www.koreafilm.co.kr/movie/family2004/gallery.htm

http://movie.naver.com/search/movie_photo.php?code=C7974

http://www.movist.com/movies/movie.asp?mid=8591

Websites on Su Ae

http://suae.lil.to/

Yahoo Pics

http://cafe.daum.net/suaelove

http://cafe.daum.net/parksuaehttp://cafe.daum.net/hanasidelove

Blogs on Su Ae

http://blog.naver.com/psj1798.do?Redirect=...gNo=20013600751

http://blog.naver.com/kmm1110.do?Redirect=...gNo=60017697110

http://blog.naver.com/rudtlrqkqh30.do

http://blog.naver.com/lategoodbye.do?Redir...gNo=80010227362

http://blog.naver.com/zenoah2000wo.do?Redi...gNo=60008649939

This thread is specially created for all those who love Su Ae. Whether you are a die-hard fanatic, a partial fan, or just a passerby, I welcome to this thread. You can post anything and everthing on Su Ae, her pics, news...anything. I am also keen to have those Su Ae fans who can read Korean as some of the blogs and websites have news updates and interviews on her which I unfortunately can't understand a single word. Would be great if you guys can help to translate and update the other fans who can't read Korean. I do not know if there is already a fan club of Su Ae around, if you do not pls let all of us know. Thanks and I look forward to you being part of the Su Aers...

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Guest siCKako

some info on wedding campaign...

_______________

-나의 결혼원정기 (Wedding Campaign) Press Screening Report

(Posted In Asia Comedy Film News Interviews Trailer Alert )

Hollywood had its 'Revenge of The Nerds' a long time ago, but now in Chungmuro it's time for 'Revenge of the country bumpkins!'

Take a look at your typical Korean TV Drama and you'll find characters forced by their mothers to go to a 선 (matchmaking date). No, it's completely different from the western idea of 'blind date', although it often gets translated as such. Those meetings are organized by matchmakers, who usually try to find the 'soulmate' for rich kids. The required characteristics of that 'soulmate' often differ from simple personality traits. Does he come from a good family? Did he go study overseas? Does he run his own company?

Of course, if you trusted TV Dramas, it would seem no couples in Korea ever marry because they simply fall for each other, which is obviously rubbish. But it is an important cultural difference between Korea and the west, and although not as widespread as TV and movie would make you believe, it's definitely nothing out of the ordinary. So in all this climate, what if you are an old bachelor from the countryside (a 농촌 노총각)? You don't have an impressive curriculum, and your family is made of farmers who just work hard to make ends meet. What kind of woman will you find?

Although it's certainly not a new subject for Korean Cinema, and sometimes it makes for some great little comedies like 고독이 몸부림칠 때 (Sweet Sixties), the plight of country bumpkins has come to the forefront in current Korean Cinema, especially in Park Jin-Pyo's 너는 내 운명 (You Are My Sunshine) and Hwang Byung-Guk's 나의 결혼원정기 (Wedding Campaign). Be it looking for a Filipino or Uzbek-Korean wife, this is one of the new 'microtrends' emerging from the new (and improved?) commercial Cinema in Chungmuro.

But 'Wedding Campaign' isn't only a comedy about awkward situations and culture clash, but also a film trying to shed light on the plight of Uzbek-Koreans, who are suffering decades of difficulties and are rarely talked about. Reviews praised the fact underneath the first layer of silliness and dramatic shenanigans there's a kind of realism hard to find in movies of this kind. And they were almost unanimously positive reviews, with a strong potential for box office success. Finding that right balance between not being too light nor too heavy is always a difficult thing for commercial films, but it seems this one pulled it off successfully. Another potential box office smash hit on our hands?

'Wedding Campaign' had its press screening at the Seoul Cinema last November 1. Present at the premiere director Hwang and stars Jung Jae-Young, Soo Ae and Yoo Joon-Sang. The film, which was screened as the closing film at the PIFF, will release on November 23.

Interview and Comments

The main female character is a North Korean defector, was there any particular reason for that?

Director Hwang Byung-Guk: When we started planning the film, the character wasn't like that. She was just someone who went to Uzbekistan, and met two North Korean defectors who came there to work in a logging factory. When we went location hunting in Vladivostok, we found 18 North Korean factory women working there. At first we didn't really plan to write the character that way, but once we were there we felt things like the identity crisis the people of Korean descent living there were experiencing. So we drew a portrait of two country bumpkins who couldn't do anything but going overseas to marry, the problems of the Uzbek-Korean people living there, and the story of a North Korean defector who wanted to come back to Korea. We just thought it would be an interesting story to tell.

The actors' dialect and foreign language acting was really good. Were there any difficulties?

Yoo Joon-Sang: The director is from Yecheon, so that's the dialect. I met with farmers there, spending the entire Winter seeing frogs, deer and raccoons. I also practiced my dialect there, or should I say, I experienced first hand life in the country, and that helped me understand the dialect a little better.

Soo Ae: I practiced in Korea as well, but since when we went to Uzbekistan I was still lacking something, the Russian and Pyeongyang Dialect coaches helped me through the shoot.

Jung Jae-Young: I learned dialect with Joon-Sang as well. If you listen to people from Yecheon they might complain about our dialect, but this being a film where we have to act through dialect, there's moments when you emphasize the peculiarities of such dialect, and some others when you're much subtler and more natural. The dialogue coach who trained Soo Ae in Pyeongyang Dialect also worked with me in 웰컴 투 동막골 (Welcome To Dongmakgol).

Hwang: The dialect used by Soo Ae in the film is not Yeonbyeon Dialect [Yeonbyeon/Yanban is a Korean Autonomous Prefecture in China], but Pyeongyang Dialect. We explain that her character has left North Korea to come work in Uzbekistan two years ago. The reason why she mixes her dialect with the 'central dialect' used in Seoul [which is the Korean you hear in most films] is because she's trying to hide her dialect, thus trying to conceal where she really comes from. All her friends speak 100% Pyeongyang Saturi.

The film already screened at the PIFF (Pusan International Film Festival). How did the critics react?

Hwang: More than the theme of the film, it looks like they were more interested in the love story between the two country bumpkins and Soo Ae. When we were out drinking with people, they told me it was a beautiful and happy film. I heard nothing but good things.

What was the most impressive scene for you?

Yoo: The scene at the bank.

Soo Ae: The one I remember the most was when Man-Taek (Jung Jae-Young) runs to find Lala.

Jung: I liked all scenes with Soo Ae. If we just came out [he and Yoo], it would have been too dark. But the moment she comes in, the film brightens instantly. The lighting director really did a good job, too. When it was time to shoot our scenes, he'd say 'almost ready, wait a second'. But if Soo Ae was involved it all was over in a moment.

Jung Jae-Young and Yoo Joon-Sang really seemed to work well together, they fit each other. Were there any interesting episodes from the shoot?

Yoo: I usually can't really drink. So the first day we started shooting in Yecheon, Jung Jae-Young came to my room, knocked and brought in some drinks. So at the end, we drank all night, up until 6 in the morning, just 60 minutes before the shooting would start. That morning I was in 'good spirits'. I mean, people come knocking at your door late, and they keep making you drink all night, until the shoot starts? In Uzbekistan there was a scene we had to shoot for the entire night, but then it didn't last that long. But Jung kept me up all night anyway. I'm really thankful to him, we spent those nights having fun. So I continued shooting in a half-conscious state. We really went through many episodes together. I really wish to thank Jung Jae-Young for teaching me how to drink.

Jung: Oh... that's all a lie. He's saying that to make you laugh. From the first moment I met Joon-Sang, there was no need to create the right mood with him. It was the same when we shot. (looks at Yoo Joon-Sang) And... who did you drink with? I can't even drink... (everybody laughs)

Quick Judgment

Premiere's Shin Jin-Ah

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Movieweek's Choi Mi-Hyun

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Screen's Park Hye-Eun

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: EXCELLENT

Sports Hanguk's Seo Eun-Jung

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Kyunghyang Sports' Choi Jae-Wook

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Movist's Lee Hee-Seung

Film Quality: AVERAGE

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Herald Economy's Lee Hyung-Seok

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

____________________

for loveletter fans...

at ji jin hee's wedding...

CA9OKV91.gif

during loveletter...

guardssh_3.jpg

untitled2dg.jpg

more on wedding campaign...

---------------

The closing film at PIFF was the premiere of debut director Hwang Byung-kuk's Wedding Campaign. The film follows two country bumpkin friends who travel to Uzbekistan in hopes of claiming a bride amongst the Korean-Uzbek population there. (Yep, more Korean diaspora cinema here at PIFF.) Although the beginning was a bit rocky, I found myself enjoying where the narrative eventually headed. Partly filmed on site in Uzbekistan, the film represents the cross promotion across nations that is a staple of PIFF and particularly its PPP (Pusan Promotion Plan).

Although Jung Jae-young has been the subject much of the critical buzz I overheard at the screening (and deservedly so), Soo Ae as the Korean-Uzbek translator also shines here. With her second lead role after her strong film debut in A Family (not screened at PIFF), she is fast becoming one of South Korea's vast reserve of stars who can carry a scene on their own or equally with another veteran actor. As an entertaining mainstream feature that provides a venue for some of South Korea's best actors and a demonstration of the international scope of what PIFF has brought to world cinema, Wedding Campaign was an excellent choice to end PIFF's 10th campaign.

:D

---------------

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Guest boroangel

Hi everyone, I have just created the offical thread on Su Ae in the Kdrama section. This is the link.

http://www.soompi.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=12938

Since no one has started any thread on her there so I took the liberty to start one. Don't mind.

Sickako, looks like you are a fan of her too? You have some lovely pics on her. Do join us and post there if you don't mind.

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Guest siCKako

you can also visit the thread i made in the Photos section:

http://www.soompi.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=4436

here's another cafe:

http://cafe.daum.net/hanasidelove

site:

http://www.popcornfor2.com/stars/SuAe.php

some news on her recent movie..wedding campaign...:D

------------

-나의 결혼원정기 (Wedding Campaign) Press Screening Report

(Posted In Asia Comedy Film News Interviews Trailer Alert )

Hollywood had its 'Revenge of The Nerds' a long time ago, but now in Chungmuro it's time for 'Revenge of the country bumpkins!'

Take a look at your typical Korean TV Drama and you'll find characters forced by their mothers to go to a 선 (matchmaking date). No, it's completely different from the western idea of 'blind date', although it often gets translated as such. Those meetings are organized by matchmakers, who usually try to find the 'soulmate' for rich kids. The required characteristics of that 'soulmate' often differ from simple personality traits. Does he come from a good family? Did he go study overseas? Does he run his own company?

Of course, if you trusted TV Dramas, it would seem no couples in Korea ever marry because they simply fall for each other, which is obviously rubbish. But it is an important cultural difference between Korea and the west, and although not as widespread as TV and movie would make you believe, it's definitely nothing out of the ordinary. So in all this climate, what if you are an old bachelor from the countryside (a 농촌 노총각)? You don't have an impressive curriculum, and your family is made of farmers who just work hard to make ends meet. What kind of woman will you find?

Although it's certainly not a new subject for Korean Cinema, and sometimes it makes for some great little comedies like 고독이 몸부림칠 때 (Sweet Sixties), the plight of country bumpkins has come to the forefront in current Korean Cinema, especially in Park Jin-Pyo's 너는 내 운명 (You Are My Sunshine) and Hwang Byung-Guk's 나의 결혼원정기 (Wedding Campaign). Be it looking for a Filipino or Uzbek-Korean wife, this is one of the new 'microtrends' emerging from the new (and improved?) commercial Cinema in Chungmuro.

But 'Wedding Campaign' isn't only a comedy about awkward situations and culture clash, but also a film trying to shed light on the plight of Uzbek-Koreans, who are suffering decades of difficulties and are rarely talked about. Reviews praised the fact underneath the first layer of silliness and dramatic shenanigans there's a kind of realism hard to find in movies of this kind. And they were almost unanimously positive reviews, with a strong potential for box office success. Finding that right balance between not being too light nor too heavy is always a difficult thing for commercial films, but it seems this one pulled it off successfully. Another potential box office smash hit on our hands?

'Wedding Campaign' had its press screening at the Seoul Cinema last November 1. Present at the premiere director Hwang and stars Jung Jae-Young, Soo Ae and Yoo Joon-Sang. The film, which was screened as the closing film at the PIFF, will release on November 23.

Interview and Comments

The main female character is a North Korean defector, was there any particular reason for that?

Director Hwang Byung-Guk: When we started planning the film, the character wasn't like that. She was just someone who went to Uzbekistan, and met two North Korean defectors who came there to work in a logging factory. When we went location hunting in Vladivostok, we found 18 North Korean factory women working there. At first we didn't really plan to write the character that way, but once we were there we felt things like the identity crisis the people of Korean descent living there were experiencing. So we drew a portrait of two country bumpkins who couldn't do anything but going overseas to marry, the problems of the Uzbek-Korean people living there, and the story of a North Korean defector who wanted to come back to Korea. We just thought it would be an interesting story to tell.

The actors' dialect and foreign language acting was really good. Were there any difficulties?

Yoo Joon-Sang: The director is from Yecheon, so that's the dialect. I met with farmers there, spending the entire Winter seeing frogs, deer and raccoons. I also practiced my dialect there, or should I say, I experienced first hand life in the country, and that helped me understand the dialect a little better.

Soo Ae: I practiced in Korea as well, but since when we went to Uzbekistan I was still lacking something, the Russian and Pyeongyang Dialect coaches helped me through the shoot.

Jung Jae-Young: I learned dialect with Joon-Sang as well. If you listen to people from Yecheon they might complain about our dialect, but this being a film where we have to act through dialect, there's moments when you emphasize the peculiarities of such dialect, and some others when you're much subtler and more natural. The dialogue coach who trained Soo Ae in Pyeongyang Dialect also worked with me in 웰컴 투 동막골 (Welcome To Dongmakgol).

Hwang: The dialect used by Soo Ae in the film is not Yeonbyeon Dialect [Yeonbyeon/Yanban is a Korean Autonomous Prefecture in China], but Pyeongyang Dialect. We explain that her character has left North Korea to come work in Uzbekistan two years ago. The reason why she mixes her dialect with the 'central dialect' used in Seoul [which is the Korean you hear in most films] is because she's trying to hide her dialect, thus trying to conceal where she really comes from. All her friends speak 100% Pyeongyang Saturi.

The film already screened at the PIFF (Pusan International Film Festival). How did the critics react?

Hwang: More than the theme of the film, it looks like they were more interested in the love story between the two country bumpkins and Soo Ae. When we were out drinking with people, they told me it was a beautiful and happy film. I heard nothing but good things.

What was the most impressive scene for you?

Yoo: The scene at the bank.

Soo Ae: The one I remember the most was when Man-Taek (Jung Jae-Young) runs to find Lala.

Jung: I liked all scenes with Soo Ae. If we just came out [he and Yoo], it would have been too dark. But the moment she comes in, the film brightens instantly. The lighting director really did a good job, too. When it was time to shoot our scenes, he'd say 'almost ready, wait a second'. But if Soo Ae was involved it all was over in a moment.

Jung Jae-Young and Yoo Joon-Sang really seemed to work well together, they fit each other. Were there any interesting episodes from the shoot?

Yoo: I usually can't really drink. So the first day we started shooting in Yecheon, Jung Jae-Young came to my room, knocked and brought in some drinks. So at the end, we drank all night, up until 6 in the morning, just 60 minutes before the shooting would start. That morning I was in 'good spirits'. I mean, people come knocking at your door late, and they keep making you drink all night, until the shoot starts? In Uzbekistan there was a scene we had to shoot for the entire night, but then it didn't last that long. But Jung kept me up all night anyway. I'm really thankful to him, we spent those nights having fun. So I continued shooting in a half-conscious state. We really went through many episodes together. I really wish to thank Jung Jae-Young for teaching me how to drink.

Jung: Oh... that's all a lie. He's saying that to make you laugh. From the first moment I met Joon-Sang, there was no need to create the right mood with him. It was the same when we shot. (looks at Yoo Joon-Sang) And... who did you drink with? I can't even drink... (everybody laughs)

Quick Judgment

Premiere's Shin Jin-Ah

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Movieweek's Choi Mi-Hyun

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Screen's Park Hye-Eun

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: EXCELLENT

Sports Hanguk's Seo Eun-Jung

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Kyunghyang Sports' Choi Jae-Wook

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Movist's Lee Hee-Seung

Film Quality: AVERAGE

Box Office Potential: GOOD

Herald Economy's Lee Hyung-Seok

Film Quality: GOOD

Box Office Potential: GOOD

------------------

The closing film at PIFF was the premiere of debut director Hwang Byung-kuk's Wedding Campaign. The film follows two country bumpkin friends who travel to Uzbekistan in hopes of claiming a bride amongst the Korean-Uzbek population there. (Yep, more Korean diaspora cinema here at PIFF.) Although the beginning was a bit rocky, I found myself enjoying where the narrative eventually headed. Partly filmed on site in Uzbekistan, the film represents the cross promotion across nations that is a staple of PIFF and particularly its PPP (Pusan Promotion Plan).

Although Jung Jae-young has been the subject much of the critical buzz I overheard at the screening (and deservedly so), Soo Ae as the Korean-Uzbek translator also shines here. With her second lead role after her strong film debut in A Family (not screened at PIFF), she is fast becoming one of South Korea's vast reserve of stars who can carry a scene on their own or equally with another veteran actor. As an entertaining mainstream feature that provides a venue for some of South Korea's best actors and a demonstration of the international scope of what PIFF has brought to world cinema, Wedding Campaign was an excellent choice to end PIFF's 10th campaign.

---------------

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