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Your level of adrenaline rush; How much does it suddenly affect your behavior? And your thoughts?

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To the point people think you're a psychopath, masochist, etc...
When you're completely furious, it helps to boost your adrenaline in a way.

Being extremely ambitious to get something done could help as well.

Etc.

But what usually goes through your mind when you're in a huge adrenaline rush? And how do you usually behave? Does it traumatize people around you? Tell us your stories!

= = = = = = = = = =

Bear Grylls goes into an adrenaline rush while jumping into a cold river butt naked and he would squeeze elephant poops for a drink. He goes into way more nonstop adventures that made people go :crazy: from the comfort of their own couch.

Another random example is when someone in the battlefield got shot but he still managed to run and jump towards the enemy by shouting "YEAAH! IT FEELS GREAT! IS THAT ALL YOU GOT!?" and finished his target off with a psychotic laugh.

No one reacted because they were also in their own adrenaline rush and they were only thinking about covering and helping the guy out... But later, they thought about how they all acted like some wild beasts out there. Those were like some of the similarities they were sharing to the point they felt even more like "brothers". But if those were stories to share with everyone else back home, they would get these looks combined: :huh::wacko::blink::crazy: . (They all got medical attention and psychological evaluation before returning home hopefully).

My friend thinks he can never become "crazy enough to hit people around" but as soon as he dared swallowing a whole tube of wasabi and transitions into a high adrenaline mode, he started to throw hammer fists all over the places with his eyes closed, even hitting people. He couldn't keep his composure... What he had in his mind all these times? According to what he said, he was imagining himself fighting a wasabi monster that had an evil face.

What about you? Any experience to share?

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^ lol. I don't even.... okay moving on...:lol:

I don't think I've ever had a huge adrenaline rush. If someone close to me is bleeding really bad all I can think is, "Get help, get help, help, help, help..." or "Stop the blood, stop, stop, stop..." (I really don't like blood DD:) Is that the same? When this happens I get afraid but then I push it aside and I'm actually more calm than I usually am so I get the job done without thinking too much. My breathing feels different too (like I'm getting in more air?) and my head just feels like it's freezing for that moment. Hey, actually that happens to me when I have to present something to my class too! haha maybe my adrenaline works the same way for any situation. For some reason it's different when a ball is being thrown at me or something though. I don't react nearly as fast or calmly...XD

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@Dumas - Great display of your strange adrenaline rush!

I reccomend you read the book On Killing.

Thanks. I've read the summaries about the book. I could relate to the whole explanations and experiences even though I'm not a Vet. But despite that, I'm not really passionate about reading that book for whatever reason I don't even know myself... Maybe later, for sure.

The whole adrenaline rush for killing doesn't shock me overall. But the whole adrenaline rush that makes my friends take their own lives is what upsets me and it remained pictured in my mind.

Just knowing that they're the very good buddies who you used to hang out with... Buddies who made you laugh, smile, etc... And then for whatever reason, before being deployed, in actions or even back home, they would end their own lives. It's a problem when there's more suicides than KIA and MIA. Can't stop them no matter how much I made them vow to not end their own lives. :(

Is that in the book too?

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i only get it if i'm competing with other ppl at something i think that i'm good at..

once my rush is over i get the shakes...>.<

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my logic and sense of control goes down the drain. i think this is the same with most people. suicide in the middle of an adrenaline rush is probably a spur of the moment thing. i dont see my self committing suicide ever, but i wouldnt be surprised if i did do it under the influence.

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@Dumas - Great display of your strange adrenaline rush!

Thanks. I've read the summaries about the book. I could relate to the whole explanations and experiences even though I'm not a Vet. But despite that, I'm not really passionate about reading that book for whatever reason I don't even know myself... Maybe later, for sure.

The whole adrenaline rush for killing doesn't shock me overall. But the whole adrenaline rush that makes my friends take their own lives is what upsets me and it remained pictured in my mind.

Just knowing that they're the very good buddies who you used to hang out with... Buddies who made you laugh, smile, etc... And then for whatever reason, before being deployed, in actions or even back home, they would end their own lives. It's a problem when there's more suicides than KIA and MIA. Can't stop them no matter how much I made them vow to not end their own lives. :(

Is that in the book too?

It helped me understand why my pops has PTSD, I can feel some of your pain as I lost two childhood homies In iraq to VIED's and an Uncle who was a Nam vet to suicide.

Im sure your homies suffered from PTSD aswell and it is definatly not some small issue as any mental condition severly effects the individual and loved ones.

Being EPTS'ed out of the Infantry was both a blessing and a Heartache for me aswell seeing as my I have buddies who deployed to Afganistan from the 25th ID. I dont have the guts to skype them as I should be their watching their six on patrol outside of the FOB. But instead im laxing in Korea waiting for my Medical waiver to come in.

But to answer your question one moment sticks out in my mind it was week 11 of Infantry OSUT and were were practicing MOUT with simunition and I was the first man stacked next to the door were were about to breach. As soon as the third man in the stack kicked open to I went in to the left maintained my sector of fire and three feet away was a drill sergeant decked out in a redman suit(during this excercise the Drills were allowed to beat the dog richard simmons out of us) needless to say I engaged him. I muzzle thumped him and and then post, frame and hooked him taking him to the ground when the I then I squezed the the trigger twice center mass style. My hands were shaking after we finished clearing the room. After that the First Sergeant came to my fireteam and asked " What are you soldier" and I screamed "IM A KILLER FIRST SERGEANT" he then asked "What are we trained to do Soldier" I replied " TO SHOOT, MOVE, COMMUNICATE AND KILL FIRST SERGEANT"

It was then that I realized the the US ARMY did a number on me they turned me into an highly motivated and agressive individual who would not hesitate to engage and destroy the enemy. And I liked and I cant wait to go back. Im sure the conditioning had to do with it but all the andrenaline does become addictive hell my Richard almost got Hard when I got to play with the MK 19.

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Damn... Childhood homies? I think that's worse than my case.

Those who I lost were buddies from several years but not all the way from childhood. We were always together on field and off field so we've pretty much developed the great "brotherhood" throughout our adventures. It would often have some emotional attachment (like brothers).

Ever since I lost them, I've started having hard time making "new friends" in the force. I didn't wanna develop any feelings of friendship with anyone there and have a repeated horrific situation. I know that "friends come and go" but to see them die "unpeacefully" is pretty tragic. Nowadays when someone in my unit kills himself, I can only go mad, but not sad like before. I'd get mad because losing our men through suicide is never gonna help in our mission (obviously). I wouldn't be sad or shocked anymore because I haven't developed any emotional attachment unlike before. So when I see others feeling very down for losing their friends (through suicide), it's like "Yeah I've been there before" and they would think I'm a guy with no heart for not showing any emotion or affection.

The reason why "suicide from friends" affected me is because we promised to breath and think again if the idea of suicide ever pops out. We vowed to never do it. We would handle everything "like-a-man". If they were killed by enemies, at least I'd see them as heroes and I would have more motivations to fight. But suicide? It kills the mood + I dunno who to blame or whatever.

All I can say is... I'm not gonna be doing this all my life... That's for sure! (And seeing the amount of divorce from many guys in the force, this is soooo encouraging!)

But hahaha I like how you described your experiences there! I've never had my hands on any heavy guns. If it's mounted, I'd feel bad for the driver having to feel your boner! (Just kidding)

I don't think it's my kind of thing to have an excitement over some huge weapons. I've heard of a guy carrying a Carl G all day without using it... HAHAHA! But then he was like "I swear if it's someone else shooting this thing instead of me, I'll be shooting you all". :lol: I guess that's how much love he's got for that weapon. The whole "hunger" and adrenaline he's been having with it.

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Actually, I'm stubborn. When I get mad, I get mad and I go crazy. But not the crazy-type where I kill people, hit people, etc. I just have a way of being 'tough' I guess?

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<br />Damn... Childhood homies? I think that's worse than my case.<br />Those who I lost were buddies from several years but not all the way from childhood. We were always together on field and off field so we've pretty much developed the great "brotherhood" throughout our adventures. It would often have some emotional attachment (like brothers).<br />Ever since I lost them, I've started having hard time making "new friends" in the force. I didn't wanna develop any feelings of friendship with anyone there and have a repeated horrific situation. I know that "friends come and go" but to see them die "unpeacefully" is pretty tragic. Nowadays when someone in my unit kills himself, I can only go mad, but not sad like before. I'd get mad because losing our men through suicide is never gonna help in our mission (obviously). I wouldn't be sad or shocked anymore because I haven't developed any emotional attachment unlike before. So when I see others feeling very down for losing their friends (through suicide), it's like "Yeah I've been there before" and they would think I'm a guy with no heart for not showing any emotion or affection.<br />The reason why "suicide from friends" affected me is because we promised to breath and think again if the idea of suicide ever pops out. We vowed to never do it. We would handle everything "like-a-man". If they were killed by enemies, at least I'd see them as heroes and I would have more motivations to fight. But suicide? It kills the mood + I dunno who to blame or whatever.<br />All I can say is... I'm not gonna be doing this all my life... That's for sure! (And seeing the amount of divorce from many guys in the force, this is soooo <strike>encouraging</strike>!)<br /><br />But hahaha I like how you described your experiences there! I've never had my hands on any heavy guns. If it's mounted, I'd feel bad for the driver having to feel your boner! (Just kidding)<br />I don't think it's my kind of thing to have an excitement over some huge weapons. I've heard of a guy carrying a Carl G all day without using it... HAHAHA! But then he was like "I swear if it's someone else shooting this thing instead of me, I'll be shooting you all". <img src='http://cdn.vanillaforums.com/soompi.vanillaforums.com/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':lol:' /> I guess that's how much love he's got for that weapon. The whole "hunger" and adrenaline he's been having with it.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

Im sorry to hear that bro, I cant help but think you should visit a chaplian. I dont think those feelings are good for unit cohesion or morale. My pops told me a story on how he wouldnt reconize an FNG/Cherry for a while because they were all replacements but then he realized that he was responsible for their lives as an NCO and would warm up to them. I think you should do the same.

Your probably one of the few heads I like on this forum bro. You got my respect.

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as adrenanline kicks up, cognititve thoughts diminish and instincts take over. its a very pure emotion that most people grow out of as they mature. hence the reason i intentionally seek these adrenaline pumping activities.

as we grow up, our minds become very complex, including our subconcious. no matter how happy/excited you may think you are at a given moment, some sort of stress will always be on the back of your mind. in that sense, i look at young children and i envy their freedom of mind and their ability to feel extremes of emotion from the smallest of stimuli.

but i too, can enjoy these pure emotions through certain activities, such as racing, bungee jumping, boxing, sex( good sex), rock climbing, hunting... even certain roller coasters will do it. my parents would argue certain activities are "risky" and that i should stay away from them, but i feel as if they're too good for my spiritual health to give up.

there will be a day when you'll be too old for any kind of excitement, so Live your lives while you can!

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