Jump to content

Joo Won 주원 [Upcoming Movie "Carter" 2021]


Recommended Posts

27 minutes ago, kittyna said:

but given that this was almost ten years ago, I hope things have been improving since :) 

Indeed, things did improved, in Itaewon class they had actually tackled racism prevalent in South Korea and also about plight of transgenders :)

 

3 hours ago, kittyna said:

So, once again, I do want to give a kudos to Yong Pal for at least touching on the challenges facing undocumented migrants living in Korea - I'm sure that was an eye-opener for many viewers, both in Korea itself and overseas. 

I think Yong-pal owes its high ratings for dealing such kind of diverse issues, raging from abuse of power by rich in South Korea to the plight of immigrants in the country:)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 57.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • coolreborn

    11648

  • stearly

    5983

  • mrdimples

    4935

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Joowon cries... I cry too~ All the hardships and happiness that we went through together the past couple of years... It has been a roller-coaster ride being in this fandom. Joowon has had to work so h

Hai girls! Sorry I've been out of it for the past couple of days. I didnt have time to go to soompi, hadnt even back-tracked the pages since Saturday and my phone takes the longest time ever to upload

The reason why JW was bending down and looking at the man. Cr as tagged. Many asked me why I like JW and why I like him for so long?  THIS. Plus his acting. 

2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

My apologies, I missed that "relatively":open_mouth:, I should have read the reply more carefully. And started talking about East Asia's diversity to an East Asian:no_mouth:, again I am terrible sorry

 

No worries - I'm just one Chinese Canadian out of many, so even I can't speak for a large group or claim to be an expert on how things actually are in East Asia right now.

 

2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Everything to you said can be summed up in this video of "Patriot Act" episode

 

Oh, yeah - I stumbled across this video this morning, and thought it would be interesting to watch as an Asian American perspective on what's happening (since regardless of if we're South Asian, East Asian, Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, etc. the point is that we're neither White nor Black - so where do we fit into all this?). But I will admit that since it's my first time watching Patriot Act, I wound up scrambling to turn down the volume once the swearing started :P Not the sort of thing I want blasting from my computer speakers first thing in the morning :lol:

 

But that being said, he brings up a really good point - which ties into what I'd said earlier about people generally being more aware of their disadvantage than their privilege. Because Asians occupy this weird middle ground in historical race-based hierarchies, there's a tendency to just focus on how much further we have to go to achieve equality with Whites without really thinking about the other end of the spectrum. My own parents raised me to know and act better, but I can definitely relate to his comments about racial slurs in Asian languages (Hong Kong Cantonese has a ton - aimed at Blacks, Whites, South Asians...heck, even mainland Chinese!), the whole "marrying someone from another race is fine so long as they're not Black", etc. just from hearing similar comments and sentiments from my own community. Like him, when I hear those things, I just cringe. :expressionless:

 

13 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

In Canada also I have read that indigenous people had or still kind of facing marginalization and systematic racism in some parts of provinces. So the protest are happening in the countries where they are actually sensitized towards racism and know how a systematic racist can harm a section of their society:mellow:

 

I didn't get around to responding to this earlier, but you're right: any Canadians who want to argue that we have a (slightly) better track record re: anti-black racism (but just slightly, mind you) need to think very, very hard about how Indigenous peoples have been treated over the years. In recent years, the government has started taking steps to further investigate the problems that continue to persist (e.g. lack of access to clean water or good health care, the increased prevalence in violent crimes against Indigenous women, severe mental health problems like depression or alcoholism as a result of centuries worth of trauma, etc.), but again, there's always room for more growth and improvement.

 

I can't say I'm an expert in any of this, but thanks for pointing it out. Everyone should look towards their own personal racial/ethnic biases right now, because I believe that only by everyone reflecting and repenting as individuals can be build a better system.

 

2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Coming to such kind of slur, which is often used by westerners against East Asians, I think it is mostly because of lack of education, they don't know yellow sea is not just a sea, but it name came from "Yellow river civilization", which is one of the oldest and advance civilization to ever exist. But ignorance of a person often deprives him/her to see things in more meaningful way.

 

 

2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I think it has partly do with the K-pop culture, where Female Idols(both in Japan and Korea, but in Japan it is more explicit in nature) are often show in light of sexual appeal implicitly, with the costumes, in others words like Eye candy. I often find the videos to in way de-humanizing about the girls who are performing in the music videos. But still, I might have a narrow understanding about it the topic.  I would like to hear it from you, as woman how do you perceive this Idol culture of girls groups?:mellow:

 

I do express my views on "Yellow Fever" in the Author's Notes of this Seolleim in Salzburg fic, but I should point out that my rant from that fic was aimed more at the "sexy Oppa" trope (i.e. how fangirls perceive and treat male Korean celebrities) than at my own experiences as a woman. The reason is quite simple: because I am a heterosexual woman, and can thus only ever be responsible for how I view the men in my life.

 

Sexual objectification is just wrong, in my book - I don't care which way it goes (man-to-woman, woman-to-man, man-to-man, woman-to-woman, etc.). So I always want to be conscious about how I look at and think about Korean guys like JW: I want to be drawn to them as people, with personalities and strengths and weaknesses, and not just as pretty faces.

 

As for myself being a Chinese Canadian girl...in the place where I live, we're a dime a dozen. :P There's nothing particularly exotically alluring about that here. However, if you want some quick, lighthearted takes on why something like "Yellow Fever", weeaboo or koreaboo culture can be inadvertently offensive, I recommend these sketch comedy videos (in "Hidden Contents" for not being directly JW-related). They're deliberately over-the-top and satirical, but if you read between the lines, you'll see what I mean by that term "Yellow Fever", and why I think we as K-drama fans need to be very conscious about our own thoughts and actions.

 

(Note: there is some profanity in the first video, so don't watch it unless you're okay with that.)

 

Spoiler

 

If you did click on the link back to the Seolleim in Salzburg fic I mentioned, you'll recognize some of the dynamics from that in this second video (just that, for the sake of it being in Salzburg, I changed the "Your English is great" to "Your German is great".)

 

 

 

Long story short: being interested in East Asian cultures is fine (why else are we here, on a K-drama fan forum?), but please don't use it as a cheesy pick-up line. It gets old :P 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, kittyna said:

I wound up scrambling to turn down the volume once the swearing started :P Not the sort of thing I want blasting from my computer speakers first thing in the morning 

Lol! I can only imagine how awkward and funny it was. :joy:

 

57 minutes ago, kittyna said:

If you did click on the link back to the Seolleim in Salzburg fic I mentioned, you'll recognize some of the dynamics from that in this second video (just that, for the sake of it being in Salzburg, I changed the "Your English is great" to "Your German is great".)

Yeah, yeah now I remember watching second video, it is the point you were making, that they presume that you are an immigrant, even though you were born and bought up in same country, this happens to every immigrant, but I think instances of such incident with East Asians is more

 

1 hour ago, kittyna said:

Yellow Fever

So that's what Yellow fever means:no_mouth::open_mouth::neutral:, another cultural shock to my list. I know people are obsessed with "ANIME" and "Kawaii" culture, but this is by far weirdest way of choosing partners.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kittyna said:

JW: I want to be drawn to them as people, with personalities and strengths and weaknesses, and not just as pretty faces.

I second that, I will always preform to look at a persons personality and his/her conduct before associating with him/her, whether in choosing partner or being a fan of an actor. And Joo won did fit the profile, I must say I never had a favorite till last year and I watched "GOOD DOCTOR" of joo won's out of curiosity, like how the show ends, but boy!! I did stumbled up on a master piece of acting of Joo won. I have to say his acting made me sympathize with others, like act only after knowing everything about the other person, what he has been through? Has he been hurt emotionally? stuff like that and the chemistry between him and Moon chae-won made me look for exactly what they had in their relationship: Strong bond, understanding, care for each other and most importantly unconditional love(this love came after they both got sensitized with each other):blush:, not like falling for looks, rather than personal traits, not like any other typical K-drama. :smile:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/26/2018 at 10:01 PM, moonstrike said:

He is that kind of person. Pure and has an angel gold heart. :bawling: click to see comments

While I was scrolling to previous posts in the forum I stumbled on this post.

Wait? I thought they broke was kind of mutual and they unfollowed each other in the instagram at the same time? :bawling: I am referring to this one. It almost feels like Boa was to one to initiate the break-up(I know there is nothing wrong in it everyone deserves to be in a relationship that he/she is happy), but sometimes the person on the receiving end kind of feels like he/she had done something wrong to cause the break-up :bawling: in this case it is our joo won

It must be hard for both of them, but as fan of Joo won and a person who knew about his past relationship, at least the ones in public forum, I think our Joo won must had taken it harder. Since, it is his first relation after debut and he always  in interviews  that he prefers long term relationship, kind of relationship which might go beyond dating. :mellow:But I am still rooting for both of them , I hope Boa continues to shine in K-pop world, leading the next generation Idols and out continues to succeed in his acting and be an example to his junior on how to be a good actor. :D And get the partners they deserve

 

PS: I know this topic is old and I am kind of late by 3 years, since I am sort of recent fan of Joo won, like I have been fan of joo won for only like less than 6 months and I have lot of catch up to do on topics and react to it accordingly, therefore, I ask  for you guys to be understanding  :sweat_smile:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

On a happy note, Joo won's fans from Korea, Japan and International sent wishes and gifts to Joo won on his 10th anniversary debut. Even in the time of pandemics fans does not cease to amuse me with their unconditional love to Joo wonie :):smiley:

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Another silver lining for this year for me. Joo won's junior in musical acting Kang Ha-neul won 56 Baeksang's best actor award:smiley: And my recent favorite actress Kim Hee-ae have  won Best actress award for "The World of  the Married":heart:. I can't wait for joo won to win  57 Baeksang's best actor award for next year, maybe I am being too optimistic :sweat_smile:

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Yeah, yeah now I remember watching second video, it is the point you were making, that they presume that you are an immigrant, even though you were born and bought up in same country, this happens to every immigrant, but I think instances of such incident with East Asians is more

 

I don't know, actually - since I live in Toronto (i.e. a very ethnically diverse city in Canada), it's not unusual to be curious about, well, anyone's racial/ethnic origins, and we do get asked this a lot as an icebreaker. But, in my own personal opinion, I think that you need to distinguish between a person's ethnicity and a person's own story when asking that sort of question. So I might, instead, ask, "What's your ethnic background?" or "Where's your family from?" if that's actually what I want to find out about a person. Just asking "Where are you from?" without any sort of qualifier or specification as to what you mean can get confusing and, as pointed out in the video, inadvertently offensive.

 

I do have to say, though, that it's been a long time since I last watched that video - and watching it now, the woman's over-the-top representation of British culture does actually sort of look like the humour you get in K-dramas. Or maybe it's just me :P 

 

18 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I know people are obsessed with "ANIME" and "Kawaii" culture, but this is by far weirdest way of choosing partners.

 

Not everyone who is into Anime or Kawaii culture is that extreme - a lot of people love it for a whole ton of different reasons, most of which would be legit. But where things get weird is when, say, people go the point of wanting to act as though they are Japanese or Korean (in the case of Hallyu) or when they just end up obsessed and try to divert every single discussion into something relating to their fandom. I'm sure you've seen comments on YouTube videos about, say, a certain recipe, and then someone comes along and says, "OMG - that's [insert K-pop idol's name] favourite!" or "Who's here because of [insert K-pop idol's name]?" or even (just using this because it's the only fandom name I know), "Who's ARMY?". I don't think there's any bad intentions behind it - it's just fans getting super hyped-up about their biases - but it does get confusing from an outsider's point of view.

 

As for choosing a romantic or sexual partner that way - again, there's nothing wrong with having a preference for Asians in and of itself. The problem is when you give off the vibe that that's all you like about the person you're dating or if you're placing unrealistic expectations of "cultural authenticity" on that person. Like when the Chinese girl in the first video I posted says about her boyfriend, "He's more Chinese than me" - but is he really? Or is he just more stereotypically Chinese and expecting that she'd like that?

 

18 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I have to say his acting made me sympathize with others, like act only after knowing everything about the other person, what he has been through? Has he been hurt emotionally? stuff like that

 

It's funny, because you see JW's acting and his characters and you think that's how it was - and then you start finding out more about his story and realize he's pretty much the most ordinary guy ever :P Middle-class; stable and loving family life; just spent his childhood going to school, extracurriculars, then back home, likes sports and music; never really rebelled as a teenager.... lol - He's this big drama actor but there's almost no real drama in his own life :D 

 

2 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Wait? I thought they broke was kind of mutual and they unfollowed each other in the instagram at the same time? :bawling: I am referring to this one. It almost feels like Boa was to one to initiate the break-up(I know there is nothing wrong in it everyone deserves to be in a relationship that he/she is happy), but sometimes the person on the receiving end kind of feels like he/she had done something wrong to cause the break-up :bawling: in this case it is our joo won

 

Other than it looking like they parted on good terms (i.e. a clean "let's just be friends" sort of breakup than an ugly drama-filled one), I don't know anything else on the matter.

 

1 hour ago, kireeti2 said:

On a happy note, Joo won's fans from Korea, Japan and International sent wishes and gifts to Joo won on his 10th anniversary debut. Even in the time of pandemics fans does not cease to amuse me with their unconditional love to Joo wonie :):smiley:

 

Yeah - sending gifts is the best way to show love right now, since going in person isn't possible (nor do I think it's what JW would want, given his calls to fans to observe physical distancing guidelines).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, kittyna said:

He's more Chinese than me

This dialogue hilarious:lol:. And I think you are right, preference is not bad, but only dating for the sake of that preference will not make a stable relationship. For instance, if he/she(I am presuming yellow fever is a gender neutral term) falls for only ethnicity/race and the personality and habits doesn't play a role in relationship, chances are there that the partner may eventually break-up if he/she finds another person with the preference they might fit regardless of personality and habits.:D

 

49 minutes ago, kittyna said:

lol - He's this big drama actor but there's almost no real drama in his own life :D

:lol::joy: The only drama he had was going home late after playing with his friends and get knocked-out with just one glass of beer and Choose the course of his preference, like in "Healing camp" show he said that, his parent were sort of against him to pursue  "Arts", but he did managed it. And other rebellious thing was that , he was actually qualified to for police promotion in military(I don't know the exact details) ,but he choose to enlist in mandatory service, which kind of brought him bitter-sweet results, his break-up and he get to make some good friends and memories in the army :smile:

 

https://www.soompi.com/article/833453wpp/joo-won-passes-exam-for-police-promotional-unit-ahead-of-his-military-enlistment

 

 

49 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Who's ARMY?". I don't think there's any bad intentions behind it - it's just fans getting super hyped-up about their biases - but it does get confusing from an outsider's point of view.

This "Army" and "Bias" thing is really getting out of control. It is good as long as you get to love your favorite Idol more than others could do, but when you start hating some other Idol for the sake of Bias and Army thing, that's a real issue. It kind of became like an ideology/ism like Nationalism and Patriotism, both are inherently good in nature but excess will lead to conflicts. There is even a course in south Korean universities where they are studying phenomenon of K-wave and its consequence. People should tread carefully while avoiding escalations :smile:

 

49 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Other than it looking like they parted on good terms (i.e. a clean "let's just be friends" sort of breakup than an ugly drama-filled one), I don't know anything else on the matter.

Well, that's good to hear. I just hope they are on speaking terms and do not feel awkward while sharing the stage or meeting on camera/off-camera. They do have lot of mutual friends though, so, I think they must be on speaking terms:smiley:

 

49 minutes ago, kittyna said:

But, in my own personal opinion, I think that you need to distinguish between a person's ethnicity and a person's own story when asking that sort of question. So I might, instead, ask, "What's your ethnic background?" or "Where's your family from?" if that's actually what I want to find out about a person. Just asking "Where are you from?" without any sort of qualifier or specification as to what you mean can get confusing and, as pointed out in the video, inadvertently offensive.

In other words don't presume the nationality of a person, noted. :grin:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so first of all - not JW-related - I just realized that the "What Kind of Asian Are You?" video had a sequel. And it's even more hilarious than the first one :lol:

 

Spoiler

 

 

And now, let's get on with replies and actually JW-related stuff. :) 

 

5 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

For instance, if he/she(I am presuming yellow fever is a gender neutral term) falls for only ethnicity/race and the personality and habits doesn't play a role in relationship, chances are there that the partner may eventually break-up if he/she finds another person with the preference they might fit regardless of personality and habits.:D

 

Exactly. Like, "Do you like me because I'm me, or because I'm Chinese/Japanese/Korean/etc.?" I don't know if that happens much for South Asians (i.e. people who aren't South Asians liking South Asians simply because of their ethnic background), but you get the idea.

 

5 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

The only drama he had was going home late after playing with his friends and get knocked-out with just one glass of beer and Choose the course of his preference, like in "Healing camp" show he said that, his parent were sort of against him to pursue  "Arts", but he did managed it.

 

:lol: Oh, wow - I completely forgot about the bit about going out with his friends! I think that was when JW was asked about the worst thing he did when he was a kid and he was just like, "I...told my parents I met up with friends to study when I was actually playing?" and everyone went, "Uh...what? That's it? That's literally the worst thing you did when you were a kid???"

 

5 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

And other rebellious thing was that , he was actually qualified to for police promotion in military(I don't know the exact details) ,but he choose to enlist in mandatory service, which kind of brought him bitter-sweet results, his break-up and he get to make some good friends and memories in the army :smile:

 

Well, it's not really rebellious, but it was unconventional. Celebrities had a bad rap for trying to get into easier/cushier positions during their enlistment by registering for the police or for non-active duty. I don't know what JW's intentions were for trying out for the police first, but I remember that he was slated to go into some sort of public safety awareness team when he did (a popular post for celebrities because it involves actual musical work, public speaking, etc.). But then, out of left field, he declined that offer and started his application all over again as an active duty soldier - and a lot of Koreans loved it. They loved seeing celebrities actively choosing the same paths that everyday citizens are obligated to follow (since getting an easier position due to high status is so rampant in Korean society). Again, we'll never know what JW's personal intentions were in choosing active duty, but the fact that he did, and in the White Skulls at that (one of the tougher units since it's based really close to the NK-SK border), really gave him a boost in male fans in particular.

 

In short: combined with doing projects like Gaksital, JW's reputation as a "patriotic actor" was set. And so long as you don't develop a major scandal later on, that means you're pretty much set for life in terms of domestic popularity and recognition ;) 

 

(Mind you: the translation "right-winged upright hero" in the subs really didn't age well in hindsight, but I'm sure it was originally meant as something good.)

 

 

5 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Lol!! "Another 50 years is enough" this comment just made me do ROFL :joy::joy:  Joo won's fans humor is off the charts 

 

It made JW ROFL as well, since the "lol" in the translation seems to be from his response. ;) 

 

And some more pics from that massive care package:

 

 

Finally, I am trying to put together another preview for my upcoming fic - I don't know when I'll get to the scene that I plan to post, but keep your eyes open for it :) 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just quickly popping by with Preview Three of my upcoming Seolleim in Salzburg installment. It's definitely still rough writing-wise, so the final version should be better. But the events and general character interactions are what you see here.

 

A quick heads-up: this excerpt does include some discussion of WWII and the Nazis - not in a way that glorifies them, by any means, but it's there. Just thought I should let you know in advance :)

 

Spoiler

“Ya, Yoo Jin-ah! Over here!”

 

Spotting Yoo Il Rak and Jung Si Won in the distance, Nae Il, Yoon Hoo, and I quicken our steps, meeting them right at the base of the Mozartplatz’s large statue. While Si Won smiles and nods at us in greeting, Il Rak grins widely and holds out a clenched fist in my direction. “I didn’t get a chance to congratulate you properly last night, so congrats!”

 

As I tap his proffered fist with my own, he raises an impish eyebrow. “So…how was it?”

 

Nae Il and I both blink in surprise. “How was what?”

 

He scoffs. “Oh, come on! You guys’re engaged now – don’t tell me you still haven’t done it yet!”

 

Watching from his place on the sidelines, Yoon Hoo lets out a snort of laughter while Si Won, jaw dropped open in shock, deals Il Rak a reproachful smack on the shoulder. As for Nae Il and I, it takes both of us a moment of slack-jawed astonishment before we could react.

 

“Ya, Yoo Il Rak,” I blurt out, incredulous. “Do you honestly believe we would have had the chance?”

 

“Besides,” Nae Il adds, “Orabang’s just come from promising Abeonim that we would wait.” She snickers despite herself. “I doubt he would’ve given us his blessing otherwise!”

 

The summons came shortly after the post-concert reception last night when, after sharing a celebratory toast with our friends and family, Abeoji ordered us to join him for breakfast in his hotel room suite in the morning. There, along with Eomma and Nae Il’s parents, we discussed possible plans for the wedding, ultimately settling on holding the ceremony during the week-long break Nae Il and I had originally slotted between our final performance of the tour in Seoul and our flight back home. Once that was settled, as Nae Il happily showed off her engagement ring to the others, Abeoji pulled me aside to one corner of the room.

 

“Remember, Wolfgang,” he gently but firmly said to me, “classical music is, first and foremost, about cultivating self-control and self-discipline. Don’t become an insult to your work by giving in to animal lusts; if you really love Seol Nae Il, you will do what’s right by her.”

 

We explain all this to the others as we now make our way together to the touring office from which we will begin our own plans for today: a Sound of Music-themed guided tour of Salzburg.

 

Geu rae. I’ve finally come around to it. Since we knew that Yoon Hoo, Il Rak, and Si Won would all be here with us together, Nae Il finally convinced me to help her make the arrangements. I did, however, stop short at the large cookie-cutter bus tours that most tourists used, opting instead for a private guide with whom we could negotiate a customized itinerary if we so wished.

 

If I was going to concede by doing this tour at all, at least it should be on my terms.

 

All the others readily agreed to the plan, and even offered to pool money to help cover the increased costs of a private booking. And thus, without them even knowing it, our small and intimate celebration of Nae Il and I’s engagement was born.

 

Several minutes before our 2:00 appointment, our guide emerges from the building. She greets us cheerfully in English, shaking our hands in turn and pausing to compliment Nae Il on the dirndl she’s changed into for the occasion. Then, after checking that the tour was booked under my name, she asks me to confirm the request that I had included in the reservation.

 

“Less time spent at the filming sites in the city so you could have more at St. Gilgen – is that correct?”

 

When I answer with a nod, she makes a note on her copy of our reservation. “I think we can make that work; is one hour and a half enough?”

 

My smile widens. “That would be perfect, thank-you.”

 

Although she tries hard to hide it, she looks visibly surprised at the sound of my voice. And no wonder: having lived first in Salzburg, then Seoul, then back again, my English accent has picked up enough Korean and German inflections to become something uniquely my own – and almost entirely impossible to place.

 

That surprise only grows even more when Lee Yoon Hoo, the most fluent speaker out of all of us, steps in to take charge with his clearly American accent. He explains where all of us are from as he joins our guide in the front seat of the bright yellow van parked nearby for our use, the rest of us piling into the back.

 

Selections from the film’s soundtrack form the background to our guide’s commentary as she drives us on a quick round of the old city. She directs her words at all of us, Yoon Hoo jumping in with brief translations in Korean where necessary; and even though Nae Il’s already lived here for over two years by this point, she stares out the window in as much wide-eyed amazement as the others, marveling at small details about the landmarks from the film that she’d never noticed before. Meanwhile, I mainly content myself with watching everyone else: trying yet ultimately unable to fully feel or appreciate their fascination and curiosity with a place that is so familiar to me.

 

We then head to the outskirts of the city, coming to a brief stop at the Schloss Leopoldskron, where our guide does an artful job of parking the van in a spot away from the crowds of tourists spilling out from the large coach buses nearby. As we mill about on the path during the few minutes we have been given to take pictures, Nae Il points out WeiherWirt, the nearby restaurant, to the others. “That’s where Orabang and I went,” she says, “when we signed our contract. And, look!” she adds, scurrying over to the water’s edge. “Those are the ducks we saw the last time, too.” She glances back at me. “Don’t you remember, Orabang?”

 

As the others glance curiously at me, I answer with a simple enigmatic smile and nod. It’s great that Nae Il is now starting to form her own memories of these places in Salzburg, but considering what else happened on the edge of this lake that day, it’s not one I want to discuss any further.

 

The Schloss Hellbrun is our next stop; this time, I’m the one with an anecdote to share, Si Won and Yoon Hoo holding back their snickers and Il Rak laughing out loud at the thought of Nae Il and I splashing around like headless chickens in the fountain to find the rings I’d dropped.

 

Then, it’s back in the van, as we now leave Salzburg altogether, heading for today’s main destination: the tiny village of St. Gilgen. The drive takes us up into the hills, densely packed neighbourhoods giving way to quaint chalet-style houses dotting the main road and peering out through the trees.

 

For the first time since our guided tour started, even I’m completely taken in by the scenery around me. Perhaps noticing this, Nae Il – who’d previously been seated on the opposite end of the three-seat row from me – now cautiously takes off her seatbelt and shuffles closer, rebuckling herself in the middle seat beside me. Leaning against my side, she reaches out for my hand; I grasp it, interweaving my fingers with hers, as the two of us share a single view of the landscape.

 

During this part of the drive, our guide continues to point out the landmarks around us: ranging from naming each soaring mountain as it appears in the distance to drawing our attention to a chapel even smaller than a house. As Nae Il and I sit more closely together, however, I spot her eyes flickering up to glance at us in the rearview mirror, crinkling at the corners as she smiles at us.

 

Even with looking up pictures online in advance, none of us are prepared for the actual sight of St. Gilgen once we arrive. Our van comes to a stop at a parking lot on the crest of a hill overlooking the small village, and all five of us are reduced to slack-jawed silence as we peer out the windows at all the traditional houses clustered together beneath us on the edge of a pristine blue lake.

 

Nae Il is the first to scramble out of the van, running straight for the grassy hillside while Yoon Hoo, Il Rak and Si Won follow behind at a more leisurely pace. After conferring with our guide on a suitable time for her to pick us up, thus allowing her the chance for a short break as well, I cross the parking lot to rejoin the others.

 

With the hour-and-a-half that we have been given, it would be entirely possible for us to make our way down to explore the cafes and shops in the actual village. However, given that we would be here during the late afternoon, we’ve instead planned to have our own light picnic dinner. Il Rak and Si Won work together to spread out the throw blanket while Nae Il, Yoon Hoo and I lay out the food: fresh fruit and bottles of radler and juice from home; and takeaway sandwiches that we picked up from a popular vegetarian café close to campus.

 

We all pick a spot around the edge of the blanket and help ourselves, the others eagerly asking Nae Il and me about our wedding plans.

 

“Knowing you, Seol Nae Il,” Si Won says, “my guess is that you’ll want to be like a princess.”

 

Nae Il, however, shakes her head. “I did think that at first,” she begins, “but what’s the point of a big fancy wedding when we’ve already been living together for a few years? And besides,” she adds, gesturing at me, “we all know how Orabang is with crowds. So, actually…the simpler, the better, I think.”

 

Si Won nods at that, and both she and Il Rak readily agree when Nae Il then moves on to request their help making the arrangements. “Orabang and I will only get to Seoul in August, and we’ll be way too busy with our own performances to do much else for the whole first week we’re there. So I’ll need to be able to keep in touch with you guys and Mini Min Hee as well as our families in order to make it all work.”

 

“You need to actually announce the engagement on social media first,” Il Rak cuts in. “Si Won-ie and I wanted to tell the others last night, but you guys haven’t said anything yet, and it’s not like we could jump the gun.”

 

“Why not at our last stop, then?” Si Won offers. “The chapel. With that being the same church where the wedding from the movie was filmed and” – she gestures to Nae Il’s dirndl – “you looking so dressed up today, I think a couple shot there would be a great way to share the good news.”

 

Nae Il and I exchange glances, neither of us actually having anticipated an impromptu photo shoot today. But after thinking it over for a moment, we both nod in agreement. “That would be great,” I say at length. “Komapda.”

 

Talk of the church from The Sound of Music naturally leads to us thinking about the film in general – and it’s only a matter of time before I find all four of the others looking pointedly curiously at me.

 

I let out a short sheepish laugh. “Wae?”

 

“I know you said once that you saw bits from the movie,” Il Rak begins, “but did you finally manage to get through the whole thing, Yoo Jin-ah?”

 

“I did,” I answer brusquely, turning away to stare at a random spot in the distance. “Eventually.”

 

“What he’s not saying,” Nae Il blurts out, “is that it literally took Yoon Hoo-sunbae and I each grabbing him by one arm in order to make it happen.”

 

I round on her, heat rushing to my face in mortification. “Ya, Seollebal!”

 

“Really?” Il Rak leans in closer from his spot across from me. “Didn’t you like it at all?”

 

“Well, to be honest,” I say, carefully mulling over my answer, “I can’t say it’s one of my favourites. The music’s good and” – I smile at Nae Il – “Maria’s the closest movie character I’ve seen to being like Seollebal in personality, but” – I finish with a self-deprecating shrug – “I still don’t really see what all the hype is about.”

 

“And I,” Nae Il interjects loudly, “don’t see why so many people from around here – like Orabang – can’t understand it. I mean, it’s such an uplifting story with everything from cute kids to gorgeous music and a beautiful romance…what’s not to love?”

 

As Si Won and Il Rak both nod silently, clearly trying to figure out which side – if any – they should pick, Yoon Hoo clears his throat softly. “Actually, if you don’t mind, Cha Yoo Jin…might I try answering that?”

 

Intrigued by his offer, I tilt my head slightly to one side. “Go on.”

 

Nodding in thanks, he turns in his seat so that he is facing Nae Il. “The Sound of Music may be a great movie for you – but have you ever thought about what it must have been like for people here while they were filming it?”

 

Her mouth opens slightly in surprise. “Sunbae….”

 

“Think about it: it was only twenty years or so after Austria lost the war, and while we can’t say this for all, the reality is that for many people back then, their memories were not of standing up against the Nazis, but of welcoming and supporting them. And now some Hollywood film crew comes along and starts putting up those red swastika banners all over the city – right where they’d actually hung in real life, mind you – to make a movie where they – not their ancestors, but they themselves – could very well have been the bad guys.” He shoots us all a pointed look. “If that sort of thing were to happen to you, wouldn’t you be offended?”

 

Nae Il pouts. “Arasseo,” she answers petulantly. “But this is different, Sunbae.”

 

“If I may,” I add, raising one hand to stop Nae Il before she continues in her protest, “I do want to point out that, all things considered, The Sound of Music probably did more good than bad for Austria’s reputation – if nothing else, it proved that not everyone back then was a Nazi or sympathized with the Party.”

 

“Fair enough,” Il Rak concedes. “Is that why didn’t you like it, then? Because of what Yoon Hoo said?”

 

I shake my head. “I would love to say it was, but I’m not so noble.” Pulling my knees up to my chest, I throw in yet another casual shrug. “I just got sick of people asking about it.”

 

His brow furrows in confusion. “Eh?”

 

“Every time I told my classmates after returning to Seoul that I was from Austria, that’s literally all they would ever talk about: singing the songs, asking me if we actually all wore dirndl and lederhosen or ate schnitzel all the time or whether Edleweiss really was a national folk song. But that’s not the Austria I knew; the Austria I knew was the centre of classical music. I wanted to talk to my classmates about Mozart, or Beethoven – not some silly movie that only the tourists knew anything about.”

  

lol - I was like mini-Yoo Jin when I was little, too. Mind you, I actually loved The Sound of Music and still do, but what I mean is that I was the classical music nerd who just couldn't comprehend all the hype surrounding popular culture. :P Like, there used to be this series of kid's movies about a dog named Beethoven, and I used to get completely thrown off when I started referring to Beethoven (the composer) only for another kid to think I was talking about Beethoven (the dog). Mentally, I'd start going, "No, I meant the composer, idiot!" - which, come to think of it, would also be a very "mini Yoo Jin" thing to say. :tounge_xd:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, kittyna said:

Okay, so first of all - not JW-related - I just realized that the "What Kind of Asian Are You?" video had a sequel. And it's even more hilarious than the first one 

Lol!! The channel is full of hilarious stuff regarding typical Asian stereotypes:D, but these three videos are my favorite ones, Asian Stereotype Police:joy::joy:

 

7 hours ago, kittyna said:

South Asians liking South Asians simply because of their ethnic background

Mostly on skin color, yeah, that's right, we are a brown nation and racist at the same time. I might be generalizing, but it is kind of synonymous to "Yellow Fever" phenomenon. Not, everyone that's it, but there is considerable no.of population who romanticize with White skin fetish.

7 hours ago, kittyna said:

Again, we'll never know what JW's personal intentions were in choosing active duty,

I think part of the reason was that, he wanted to change is image as a flower boy and transform his personality. Like he saw it in his seniors that they totally changed after enlisting in the army. He did mentioned it in his interview before enlistment, he wanted to be more masculine, not like toxic masculinity, but in terms of being dependable and more mature.

7 hours ago, kittyna said:

(Mind you: the translation "right-winged upright hero" in the subs really didn't age well in hindsight, but I'm sure it was originally meant as something good.)

It sounded more like propaganda video done by North Korea news channel:joy::joy:, but still Joo won took a huge risk by doing "Bridal Mask" and it paid off massively in terms of popularity both in Korea and Overseas. .I head from somewhere that it was first offered to Lee Seung Gi, but he turned it down claiming he have concerts in Japan and it would affect that.

7 hours ago, kittyna said:

scandal later on,

I am pretty sure Joo won doesn't even know the meaning of it. Joo won has lot of support system to lean on to in case  he hits low point in his life(cause that's the reason why most of celebrities opt for doing drugs/DUI) from friends from agency, musical actor/actress friends to family:blush:

7 hours ago, kittyna said:

Finally, I am trying to put together another preview for my upcoming fic - I don't know when I'll get to the scene that I plan to post, but keep your eyes open for it :) 

Yup, looking forward to it :thumbsup:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kittyna said:

He scoffs. “Oh, come on! You guys’re engaged now – don’t tell me you still haven’t done it yet!”

A little head-ups would have been nice if you were going to venture into that part of their relationship;):P, I have always seen Cha Yoo-jin and Nae-il's relationship as some kind of teenage cum first lover, like it is innocent and nascent in nature. But yeah, with time they relationship should also mature and move it to next level:blush:

1 hour ago, kittyna said:

 The Sound of Music

When you mentioned this movie it reminded me of "The flowers of war" movie of Chinese, it also took place in similar time period of "The sound of music", but less to do with music, the movie does have music elements, but more gory stuff has been emphasized

1 hour ago, kittyna said:

Beethoven (the composer) only for another kid to think I was talking about Beethoven (the dog)

Lol!!! Popular culture always trumps the classical culture, although it does have to do with access, since classic culture is predominantly controlled by elites and there is no chance for common public to know about them, unless they show some interest, that's the mains reason why classical culture is steadily disappearing in every countries culture

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank goodness! I thought I was the only one who cannot assume right age  of  a woman, especially East Asians(I always assume their age by 5 to 10 years less than their original age ). I started to think I was being ageist or something wrong with my perception, I am glad that all the guys are on the same page regardless of ethnicity  :P:joy:

 

 

 

 

  • LOL 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I think part of the reason was that, he wanted to change is image as a flower boy and transform his personality. Like he saw it in his seniors that they totally changed after enlisting in the army. He did mentioned it in his interview before enlistment, he wanted to be more masculine, not like toxic masculinity, but in terms of being dependable and more mature.

 

Well, I do think he grew up in that process, so if that was his goal, then he's succeeded :) 

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

It sounded more like propaganda video done by North Korea news channel:joy::joy:,

 

Better than me, then - because my first thought was, like, the far right uber-nationalistic parties that have been cropping up in Europe or North America or even Japan (the Japanese far right is the side of the political spectrum most vocal about denying WWII atrocities there or being racist towards ethnic Korean living there, etc.). So I was like, "right wing"...as a compliment? Um, okay.... I know they meant it in the sense of "patriotic" or maybe even "conservative" (which, for someone JW's age, he is - at least in terms of personal conduct), but it just didn't come out right when it can also carry so many negative connotations.

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I head from somewhere that it was first offered to Lee Seung Gi, but he turned it down claiming he have concerts in Japan and it would affect that.

 

I don't know who the "top Hallyu stars" were that JW is being compared to - I wasn't into K-dramas yet at the time, and it's not something I've ever been interested in finding out.

 

8 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Joo won has lot of support system to lean on to in case  he hits low point in his life(cause that's the reason why most of celebrities opt for doing drugs/DUI) from friends from agency, musical actor/actress friends to family:blush:

 

Either a low point (like, say, developing depression is a big one), or because the fame/wealth/etc. got to his head. Both are equally possible, at least in the entertainment industry where I'm from.

 

But in Korea - and other strongly Confucian or hierarchy-driven societies - there's also the risk of pressure from sunbaes. That's what prompted JW to try alcohol for the first time, for example: he knew he was underage, but his high school sunbae offered him a beer and he either couldn't or didn't refuse. And with JW being so keen on showing proper respect and obedience to his elders...I was concerned about him for quite a long time. I was concerned that his seniors' vices might end up becoming normalized for him or that he might be pressured into joining in with their bad habits - we see, for instance, sunbaes suggesting him to get out and "enjoy" life more for the sake of his acting, and when the conversation's about clubbing or partying or romantic scenes...that's a bit worrisome.

 

So in that sense, the self-assurance and confidence he's developed by 2015 and what we saw in Healing Camp was massively reassuring for me. Even though I only became a fan of JW's dramas in 2016, I did watch his interviews and variety show appearances in rough chronological order - so it took me a while to get from the super-innocent (yet also super-impressionable) maknae from 1N2D and Win Win to the more firm and determined young man in Healing Camp. :) 

 

6 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

A little head-ups would have been nice if you were going to venture into that part of their relationship;):P, I have always seen Cha Yoo-jin and Nae-il's relationship as some kind of teenage cum first lover, like it is innocent and nascent in nature. But yeah, with time they relationship should also mature and move it to next level:blush:

 

I hope it was clear from that excerpt then that, no, it hasn't happened yet ;) And I can also assure you, as the writer, that I will never write explicit sexual scenes in my fics. Instead, when and if I do have characters sleeping together, it'll always be either implied or just mentioned after the fact (i.e. you'll know when they've actually done it, but I won't actually show it).

 

In my interpretation of Nae Il's Cantabile - and, thus, in Seolleim in Salzburg - Yoo Jin and Nae Il are both really innocent when it comes to physical intimacy, but in different ways.

 

Yoo Jin is more conventionally innocent, in my opinion: since I'm going with the version of events where he hasn't slept with Chae Do Kyung (i.e. that their staying up all night really is just them talking, practicing, etc.), I get to play with the idea that he's actually completely new to this. But, since he's also the guy, I get to play with the idea that he might be unusual for that (because many 20-something Korean guys are sexually active), or that his peers might assume he's already slept with Nae Il (since they're actually living together).  

 

As for Nae Il, she's the sort of girl who thinks she's ready to move on to the next step right away. We see her initiating a lot of the skinship in the drama, and there's also that hilarious bit where Yoo Jin discovers she packed skimpy lingerie in her luggage during her competition in Salzburg :P But underlying that, I think, is a great deal of innocence and naivety: Nae Il wants to progress quickly because she thinks that's what's expected of her in a dating relationship. But once her own feelings for Yoo Jin deepen and once she starts to realize that he'd rather move on at a slower pace, I think she'd be willing to slow down alongside him.

 

6 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

When you mentioned this movie it reminded me of "The flowers of war" movie of Chinese, it also took place in similar time period of "The sound of music", but less to do with music, the movie does have music elements, but more gory stuff has been emphasized

 

Wow...that's quite the mental association there. But you're right that there is that dark historical undercurrent in The Sound of Music that so many other films (like The Flowers of War) are more direct about. Which is what I have Lee Yoon Hoo pointing out to Nae Il in that excerpt: you can't just take the good without thinking about the implications of the bad.

 

6 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Lol!!! Popular culture always trumps the classical culture, although it does have to do with access, since classic culture is predominantly controlled by elites and there is no chance for common public to know about them, unless they show some interest, that's the mains reason why classical culture is steadily disappearing in every countries culture

 

Yeah :tounge_xd: Hence why, in hindsight, my "No, I meant the composer, idiot!" reaction was very much like how Yoo Jin would react under similar circumstances :lol:

  • Like 1
  • Insightful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Yoo Jin discovers she packed skimpy lingerie in her luggage during her competition in Salzburg :P

That scene was hilarious, Nae Il was asking Min Do-Hee to spread rumors about them:joy::joy:, like they are already started living like husband and wife :joy:

 

32 minutes ago, kittyna said:

As for Nae Il, she's the sort of girl who thinks she's ready to move on to the next step right away. We see her initiating a lot of the skinship in the drama, and there's also that hilarious bit where Yoo Jin discovers she packed skimpy lingerie in her luggage during her competition in Salzburg :P But underlying that, I think, is a great deal of innocence and naivety: Nae Il wants to progress quickly because she thinks that's what's expected of her in a dating relationship. But once her own feelings for Yoo Jin deepen and once she starts to realize that he'd rather move on at a slower pace, I think she'd be willing to slow down alongside him.

I couldn't agree more. She does initiate lot of skin-ship persistently despite resistance from  Yoo jin . But still I think all that behavior is because of her influence due to K-drama in the series:P

 

35 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Wow...that's quite the mental association there. But you're right that there is that dark historical undercurrent in The Sound of Music that so many other films (like The Flowers of War) are more direct about. Which is what I have Lee Yoon Hoo pointing out to Nae Il in that excerpt: you can't just take the good without thinking about the implications of the bad.

I consider both have similar settings in way, both countries were invaded and lost the sovereignty of the people to a foreign rule. But the treatment was selective in the case of "The sound of music", where as "The flowers of war" had more violent treatments regardless of age/gender

40 minutes ago, kittyna said:

Better than me, then - because my first thought was, like, the far right uber-nationalistic parties that have been cropping up in Europe or North America or even Japan (the Japanese far right is the side of the political spectrum most vocal about denying WWII atrocities there or being racist towards ethnic Korean living there, etc.). So I was like, "right wing"...as a compliment? Um, okay.... I know they meant it in the sense of "patriotic" or maybe even "conservative" (which, for someone JW's age, he is - at least in terms of personal conduct), but it just didn't come out right when it can also carry so many negative connotations.

I think both right-wing and left-wing ideologies play a role in balancing economic and cultural aspects of a country's society, both play a complementary role. As long as they don't get extreme,  A lot of people blame right-wing for WW2, it is not that simple, yes, Nationalism had role in it, but that nationalism was in it's extreme form. Nationalism is not inherently bad, it brings people together, as long as it is not based on religion/race/ethnicity, nationalism can foster brotherhood among all the  people of a country. 

Full disclosure: I don't subscribe to right-wing Ideology nor am a conservative, I just try to understand what other side of ideology think and do, and what made them to think and do it such a way. I am more of a center-left, liberal and sometimes even extreme advocate of women equality.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

Thank goodness! I thought I was the only one who cannot assume right age  of  a woman, especially East Asians(I always assume their age by 5 to 10 years less than their original age ). I started to think I was being ageist or something wrong with my perception, I am glad that all the guys are on the same page regardless of ethnicity  :P:joy:

 

lol - That video's funny. And I thought it was interesting how they flipped in the end to reveal that the girl was wondering whether the guy was straight or gay the entire time. Which, to be honest, I can attest to doing every single time someone refers to their significant other as their "partner" because then it could go either way.

 

I am also terrible at guessing people's ages - and since it's oftentimes rude to ask, I think I'll probably never know the actual age of most of my colleagues, associates, etc. School's different, since most people in the same year would be roughly the same age (there are always exceptions, but more or less), but once you're in the workforce? Good luck trying to figure that out :P

 

So I find it fascinating that so much of Korean etiquette is based around knowing each person's age - a cultural quirk that shows up as an example of the culture shock faced by Korean expats/immigrants/etc. in North America in this sketch (when the hoobae in the office starts bossing around his sunbae because he's actually older :P)

 

 

By the way, since the video also brings up the gazillion romantic anniversaries Koreans have - I haven't mentioned those so far in my Seolleim in Salzburg series because, to be fair, probably even Yoo Jin and Nae Il can't make up their minds when exactly they started dating (Nae Il would say either the day Yoo Jin fell asleep at her doorstep or the day of their first duet, for sure; but Yoo Jin's answer would considerably later). And if you can't even figure that out as a couple...the rest won't work :P 

 

6 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

That scene was hilarious, Nae Il was asking Min Do-Hee to spread rumors about them:joy::joy:, like they are already started living like husband and wife :joy:

 

I think the moment that absolutely made that scene was Mini Min Hee's reaction once Yoo Jin showed up - she was just like, "Yep. I knew it."

 

6 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

I consider both have similar settings in way, both countries were invaded and lost the sovereignty of the people to a foreign rule. But the treatment was selective in the case of "The sound of music", where as "The flowers of war" had more violent treatments regardless of age/gender

 

Actually, the Anschluss (i.e. the Nazi annexation of Austria prior to and during WWII) is more complicated than the Imperial Japanese invasion of China, since there were many people who both supported and opposed the Nazi party at the time. So the perspective that's shown in The Sound of Music - where Germany was definitely the aggressor - is not the whole story, and some have argued that Austria's claim to being a victim of foreign occupation has allowed the government and the general public to deny their involvement in atrocities like the Holocaust until official policy finally shifted in the 1980s.

 

7 hours ago, kireeti2 said:

A lot of people blame right-wing for WW2, it is not that simple, yes, Nationalism had role in it, but that nationalism was in it's extreme form. Nationalism is not inherently bad, it brings people together, as long as it is not based on religion/race/ethnicity, nationalism can foster brotherhood among all the  people of a country. 

 

I also think patriotism, in moderation, can be good - as long as it doesn't get to the point of xenophobia or an inability to recognize one's own country's faults.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, kittyna said:

to be fair, probably even Yoo Jin and Nae Il can't make up their minds when exactly they started dating (Nae Il would say either the day Yoo Jin fell asleep at her doorstep or the day of their first duet, for sure; but Yoo Jin's answer would considerably later). And if you can't even figure that out as a couple...the rest won't work :P 

I think they officially started dating after the Blind audition episode, but before that they had a fight like real couple when all his friends were flocking to Lee Yoon-Hoo, and Yoo jin started to show his jealousy side when Nae-Il started hanging out with Yoon-Hoo. :)

 

6 hours ago, kittyna said:

So I find it fascinating that so much of Korean etiquette is based around knowing each person's age - a cultural quirk that shows up as an example of the culture shock faced by Korean expats/immigrants/etc. in North America in this sketch (when the hoobae in the office starts bossing around his sunbae because he's actually older :P)

Lol!! That small face compliment though, Joo won always gets this compliment  on variety shows or some celebrity talking  about him. It's the first thing they say about Joo Won that "his face is small", I though they were just describing him physically, now I understand that it is a compliment in Korea :joy:

 

6 hours ago, kittyna said:

I can attest to doing every single time someone refers to their significant other as their "partner" because then it could go either way

Lol!! Just like Kim Sang-Il's homosexual radar in Kim's convenience show :joy:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Guest changed the title to Joo Won 주원
  • partyon changed the title to Joo Won 주원 [Upcoming Movie "Carter" 2021]

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..