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Son Ye-Jin 손예진

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I'm curious, does anyone know why SYJ goes by Son Ye-Jin instead of her birth name, Son Eon-Jin? I know sometimes agencies pick stage names for their talent, but I can seem to find any discussion about this. Is her name possibly patterned after Im Ye-Jin?

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OSEN | 2020. 07. 27
Lee Min Ho becomes "hottest" star overseas thanks to YouTube, Netflix

 

2801B2DD-E1C1-4EA1-8864-BD48FA15914F.jpg

http://digitalchosun.dizzo.com/site/data/html_dir/2020/07/27/2020072780091.html

 

Netizens voted Lee Min Ho as the most popular star among international fans thanks to global video-sharing platforms such as YouTube, Netflix, etc.


According to the results of the "Who is the star well-known overseas thanks to global video platforms like YouTube, Netflix, etc." vote conducted for 7 days from July 19 to July 25 by Exciting DC, run by community portal site DC Inside (Director Kim Yoo Sik) and trend search company Mycelebs, Lee Min Ho took the top spot.


The most-voted star with 6,221 votes (36%) out of 17,100 is Lee Min Ho - the actor who once went viral across Asia and rose to the class of A-list stars with the famous drama "City Hunter". After picking up consecutive achievements with a series of hits namely "The Heirs", "Legend of the Blue Sea", etc., recently, Lee Min Ho is receiving enthusiastic attention in not only Asia but also the world thanks to the drama "The King: Eternal Monarch" broadcast via Netflix.

 

Hyun Bin - the actor who started to be popular through dramas "My Lovely Sam Soon", "Secret Garden", etc. - came runner up with 4,878 votes (29%). He is stirring up many countries, especially Japan, with the drama "Crash Landing on You" airing on Netflix recently.


Third place went to actor Kim Soo Hyun with 3,304 votes (accounting for 19%). Kim Soo Hyun rose to the ranks of Asian stars after earning tremendous love in the Chinese market through 2013's "My Love From the Star". Lately, with "It's Okay to Not Be Okay" - the production marking his comeback after demobilization, the actor is yet again causing a sensation through the small screen.


In addition, the next positions in the top went to actor Son Ye Jin, group BTS, and actor Joo Ji Hoon, respectively.

 

 

OSEN = Reporter Park So Young comet568@osen.co.kr
Everything Idol, Everyday Exclusive
https://vtoday.vlive.tv/home

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Some past videos that talk about SYJ subbed and uploaded on twitter...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quick question - Ye Jin is credited as being having lots of ideas for scenes, etc. Is she branching up to be a director or is this uncommon in South Korea for a female? I can see her being much better than first time directors in some of the movies/dramas she acted in.

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@NonKoreanMango, I think it would be amazing if she branched into directing! But, like you suggest, I feel gender politics plus the hierarchical structure of k-ent might pose obstacles. Transitioning from actress to director seems much more common in Hollywood.

 

Here's an old interview from The Last Princess days when she invested her own money into the film. I think she would be a great producer. Based on the success of her films, she clearly has a good eye for what the audience likes.

https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20160729002600315

 

There is yet another reason for her to feel extra jittery about this film: She joined the production as an investor for the first time.

"It is a large-scale historical movie, and the production cost kept rising. The team all wanted to make this one perfect. I discussed with the director and my management about how to create a more comfortable working environment for all staff," Son said. She invested 1 billion won (US$886,500) in the production.

On the possibility of taking this chance to turn into a professional investor, "That will depend on how this movie turns out," she joked.

But she got all serious when she talked about the prospect of becoming a producer.

"When I am involved with script-writing and talking with a director, ideas naturally come to mind on what kinds of movie would appeal to moviegoers," she said. "The more stories I have in mind, the more I think about producing."

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https://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/2020/07/28/entertainment/television/Mr-Trot-Itaewon-Class-Crash-Landing-on-You/20200728171900361.html
'Crash Landing on You,' 'Mr. Trot' most talked about online in first half

 

0DFD5BBA-49EE-4DB4-A39E-76FC01468DBA.jpg

TvN’s hit drama series "Crash Landing on You" (2019)



TvN’s hit drama series "Crash Landing on You" (2019) and TV Chosun’s hit singing competition show "Mr. Trot" (2020) were the most talked about TV shows online in the first half of the year, according to a survey conducted by the Korea Communications Commission (KCC) on Tuesday.


Apart from audience ratings, the KCC has been conducting an internet survey on TV programs since 2018 to present qualitative values such as viewers' response and preferences. The survey includes indicators such as internet postings, comments and the number of views on related clips.


Following tvN series "Crash Landing on You,” JTBC's "The World of the Married” (2020) and JTBC’s “Itaewon Class" (2020) were the most talked about drama series online in the first half of the year.


According to the KCC, Lee Jung-hyuk's character played by Hyun Bin in "Crash Landing on You” was a hot topic, while "The World of the Married" had a lot of responses related to its fast-paced and suspenseful storytelling. For "Itaewon Class," its original soundtrack garnered attention.

 

A91AC81F-8D31-464C-98E6-E80F89681E38.jpg

TV Chosun's hit singing competition show "Mr. Trot" (2020)

 

 

Among entertainment programs, TV Chosun's "Mr. Trot," "Taste of Mr. Trot," and "The Call Center of Love" received the most internet responses in the first half of the year.


EBS's "Giant Peng TV" was the most talked about online among educational shows aired between April and June.

 

 

BY KIM YEON-AH   [kim.yeonah@joongang.co.kr] 

 

————

 

http://netizenbuzz.blogspot.com/2020/07/what-were-most-buzzed-about-dramas-and.html

What were the most buzzed about dramas and varieties online this year?

 

Article:  Im Young Woong and Mr. Trot, World of the Married, Paengsoo... the hottest on the internet of the first half of the year

Source: Joongang Ilbo via Naver


Top dramas of the first half of 2020
E024E6DA-BBEB-43EA-B049-9A13C662868A.jpg
1. Crash Landing on You (12k posts, 75k comments, 12.8m views, 10.8% viewer rating)
2. World of the Married (10k posts, 71k comments, 9.8m views, 14.9% viewer rating)
3. Itaewon Class (7k posts, 40k comments, 5.1m views, 10.3% viewer rating)
4. Love is beautiful, life is wonderful (611 posts, 3k comments, 1m views, 26.7% viewer ratings)
5. Once Again (890 posts, 10k comments, 1.9m views, 25% viewer ratings)
6. Unasked Family (373 posts, 1k comments, 457k views, 23.1% viewer ratings)

 

 

Top variety shows of the first half of 2020
1. Mister Trot
2. Mister Trot's Taste
3. Romantic Call Centre
4. Giant PaengTV


1. [+220, -13] Im Young Woong's song touches the heart~ I haven't missed one episode of 'Mister Trot' and I'm still watching reruns.

2. [+153, -11] Im Young Woong and 'Mister Trot' have changed my life. I've never liked a celebrity before but I've been supporting him ever since. He's become my vitamin every single day, and life has just gotten so much happier. He must be glad I'm his fan.

3. [+124, -6] Of course 'Mister Trot' is the highest ranking variety show of 2020. With Im Young Woong at the center, all of the trotmen have shined, and I thank all of them for helping us through these difficult times. Looking forward to more shining activity from Im Young Woong.

4. [+74, -8] It wouldn't be an exaggeration to say Im Young Woong has led this, he's the best

5. [+53, -5] Im Young Woong pretty much led this on his own...

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In regard to The Last Princess, I read at the time that SYJ invested in the film at the last minute because the production company had run out of funds to complete the movie. Without her financial help, the film may not have been completed. She said at the time she felt pressure playing an important historical person and she wanted to properly complete the film. There has not been any other report of her investing her own funds in her projects.

 

From what I have read, SYJ is conservative with her finances (her mother handled her accounts until only a few years ago). She once owned an investment building near Central Seoul but had tenant issues. She sold the building a few years later.

 

The parent company of her agency, Spackman Entertainment, has acquired several production companies to become a Korean independent film producer. But it has not cast SYJ in any of its productions. (Her friend, Kong Hyo Jin was in one of the larger ones, Crazy Romance, which had a $21M global box office on $5.6M budget). SYJ is at the pay level for major studio productions. Ironically, Spackman recently received an unsolicited bid for one of its production subsidiaries by a "content group" which infers internet platform.

 

This shows that Korean film production is a very hot commodity. South Korea is now the world's fourth largest movie theater box office. One does not need to go to Hollywood to have a global hit film such as Parasite.

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About "CRAZY ROMANCE", I didn't quite get the ending. I'm not Korean by the way. I just saw this movie and was confused by the ending. Can anyone here explain it to me. Thanks

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13 hours ago, welh11 said:

In regard to The Last Princess, I read at the time that SYJ invested in the film at the last minute because the production company had run out of funds to complete the movie. Without her financial help, the film may not have been completed. She said at the time she felt pressure playing an important historical person and she wanted to properly complete the film. There has not been any other report of her investing her own funds in her projects.

 

From what I have read, SYJ is conservative with her finances (her mother handled her accounts until only a few years ago). She once owned an investment building near Central Seoul but had tenant issues. She sold the building a few years later.

 

The parent company of her agency, Spackman Entertainment, has acquired several production companies to become a Korean independent film producer. But it has not cast SYJ in any of its productions. (Her friend, Kong Hyo Jin was in one of the larger ones, Crazy Romance, which had a $21M global box office on $5.6M budget). SYJ is at the pay level for major studio productions. Ironically, Spackman recently received an unsolicited bid for one of its production subsidiaries by a "content group" which infers internet platform.

 

This shows that Korean film production is a very hot commodity. South Korea is now the world's fourth largest movie theater box office. One does not need to go to Hollywood to have a global hit film such as Parasite.

MS Team (Son Ye Jin's Agency) is under Spackman Media Group, A Wholly-Owned Subsidiary Of Spackman Entertainment Group and co-produced and marketed many of her films and tv shows. Also, Son Ye Jin is one of the top producers' choice so if you are a company managing her entertainment career, it would be more logical to receive investment from producers instead of shelling out own money to grow your company.

 

Son Ye Jin is conservative with her finances, meaning she knows how and when to spend it. She is a good business woman too. She is an investor (and evangelist) of the brand Skin Inc that's own by Spackman Media Group, hence, it's not impossible that she is also an investor/ producer in Spackman Media Group entertainment subsidiaries itself such as her managing agency MS Team. She's not just the type who announce everything.

 

You said: "One does not need to go to Hollywood to have a global hit film such as Parasite."

 

It's true. Son Ye Jin had movies that were a hit overseas as well such as A Moment To Remember ($27.3M  in Japan alone in the year 2005 so go figure how much would that be today) and April Snow ($25M in Japan alone in 2005) which are still unbeatable as the top Korean films in the Japanese box office, Parasite ($22.7M in Japan alone in 2020) only came third. The Last Princess ($40M global box office, budget approx $9.5M), The Pirates $64.41M Korean box office alone plus Lotte Entertainment pre-sold it to 15 countries at the 2014 Cannes Film Market, budget $13M), Be With You ($19.4M in Korean Box Office alone plus it was released internationally in 17 countries including: USA, Canada, Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Singapore, Taiwan, Vietnam and Malaysia.) were also a hit in some countries overseas. However, we cannot deny the fact the Hollywood is a bigger platform and most Korean celebrities wish to be noticed in Hollywood. Parasite only became a global hit  and created a buzz when it won Oscars in the Hollywood. It did not earn that much when it was first shown in South Korea. Even a well-established and popular actor Park Bo Gum was not shy to announce in his recent interview that he wishes he'll get noticed by Hollywood.

 

As for her building, the reason for selling was not because of the tenancy problem. She bought the building with the intention to sell it (buy and sell as many business people do).  The tenancy issue came when the tenancy agreement expired and the tenant (who was the tenant of the previous building owner by the way) refused to vacate the property. SYJ asked them to vacate the property because she was gonna sell it but the tenant refused since they had a good business there and they were asking for compensation for the 'trouble' of moving.

 

I am rooting for her to be a director and full blown producer in the future :)

 

https://www.asiaone.com/business/iconic-korean-actress-son-ye-jin-ms-team-under-spackman-media-group-wholly-owned

 

https://www.media-outreach.com/View/11514/Iconic+Korean+Actress+Son+Ye-jin+Of+MS+Team%2C+Under+Spackman+Media+Group%2C+A+Wholly-Owned+Subsidiary+Of+Spackman+Entertainment+Group%2C+Starts+Filming+For+TVN%E2%80%99s+K-Drama+LOVE%E2%80%99S+CRASH+LANDING+.html

 

https://www.businesstimes.com.sg/companies-markets/son-ye-jin-represented-by-spackman-talent-agency-to-star-in-new-k-drama

 

https://spackmanmediagroup.com/brands

 

https://www.investor-one.com/market/quick_facts/193156-Spackman-Son-Ye-Jin-Wins-Best-Actress-Award--Popularity-Award-At-The-Seoul-Awards

 

https://nebula.wsimg.com/60826b91cff50fa8c8a60e82cf48b64e?AccessKeyId=CFB69E6CC12E39216AB4&disposition=0&alloworigin=1

 

https://www.investor-one.com/market/quick_facts/193156-Spackman-Son-Ye-Jin-Wins-Best-Actress-Award--Popularity-Award-At-The-Seoul-Awards

 

 

 

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@yejinatic1981 with regards to Spackman and skin inc , my understanding is Spackman  invested skin inc . The CEO of skin inc Sanbrina Tan said SYJ is shareholder of skin inc through Spackman. So I think SYJ probably may hold some sorts of stocks and shares in Spackman. I think rather than her direct investment in skin inc , she may have business relation with it through Spackman. Obviously this is not public interest and my personal guess may not be correct. And she is very private and I am being nosy. 
 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/markets.businessinsider.com/amp/news/Skin-Inc-Global-Announces-Strategic-Investment-from-Spackman-Entertainment-Group-and-Spackman-Media-Group-1001819199

 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/m.buro247.sg/amp/15234

 

@welh11 I also searched and thought about Spackman production and SYJ before. That’s what I come up with. . Spackman is a big conglomerate and production company. They invested in production and I don’t think they will get much involve in casting or produce movies  for their subsidiary Agencies artists. But they might end up Co produce or invested in the movies which happen casted the artists related to them.
 

For eg. Yoon In Ah and , his recent movie . He is under the agency which also subsidiaries of Spackman. they co produced the movie

 

Spackman is one of the major investors of be with you movie which casted SYJ. 

 

https://www.investor-one.com/editorial/2284-Spackman-backed-film-Be-With-You-has-broken-Korean-film-office-record-for-romance-movies.

 

On the other hand,  in negotiation movie ,for example , the director presented his work to that Confidential assignment director/producer and he became the main producer of the movie with the other investors in the movie. Not the other way round. 


 artists also decide which movie they are appearing. For example, Pirates which SYJ appeared was produced by big investment company like Lotte.

@yejinatic1981 was right. For an artist with SYJ caliber who has strong ticketing power and producers’ choice , she would choose to appear in any movie she would like to. 


Thats why her movies  and Spackman production may or may not have business ties. 

 

 

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On 7/29/2020 at 12:07 AM, Muhammed Riyazudeen said:

About "CRAZY ROMANCE", I didn't quite get the ending. I'm not Korean by the way. I just saw this movie and was confused by the ending. Can anyone here explain it to me. Thanks

I assume "Crazy Romance" is the same as "Crazy First Love." The movie is a little hard to understand. It starts as a comedy fantasy but is like a romance tragedy at the end. Probably helps to know Korean language and culture, and I don't. I've seen it twice and I'll give you my understanding of the ending.


 

Spoiler

 

Il-mae (SYJ) and Tae-il grew up together in the same house, so for Il-mae they are like brother and sister. Tae-il is madly in love with her and never wavers even after many obstacles. He stops pursuing her and returns to his law studies when Il-mae  eventually tells him that she loves another man whom she is going to marry and that she has already been with him many times.

 

The real reason, however, is that Il-mae found out while in college that she has the same disease as her mother and that she will die young. Her mother got pregnant with her in high school and died. Her father loved her mother so much that he stayed single the rest of his life. Il-mae did not want Tae-il to suffer the same fate as her father, so she rejected him so that he could live a normal life.

 

When Tae-il realizes during his second law exam that Il-mae is marrying someone else to protect him, he rushes back to the wedding and begs for it to be annulled. The father tells Il-mae that he has lived a happy life with the memory of her mother always with him. The fiance/husband did not know how sick Il-mae was and agrees to annul the wedding. Tae-il says he wants to be by Il-mae's side until her last day while also studying medicine to find a cure. The last scene is Tae-il by Il-mae's side in the hospital, and she has a flashback of when they married and had their first kiss.

 

The story ends and you'll have to imagine what happened afterward.

 

 

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2 hours ago, SonBender said:

I assume "Crazy Romance" is the same as "Crazy First Love." The movie is a little hard to understand. It starts as a comedy fantasy but is like a romance tragedy at the end. Probably helps to know Korean language and culture, and I don't. I've seen it twice and I'll give you my understanding of the ending.


 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Il-mae (SYJ) and Tae-il grew up together in the same house, so for Il-mae they are like brother and sister. Tae-il is madly in love with her and never wavers even after many obstacles. He stops pursuing her and returns to his law studies when Il-mae  eventually tells him that she loves another man whom she is going to marry and that she has already been with him many times.

 

The real reason, however, is that Il-mae found out while in college that she has the same disease as her mother and that she will die young. Her mother got pregnant with her in high school and died. Her father loved her mother so much that he stayed single the rest of his life. Il-mae did not want Tae-il to suffer the same fate as her father, so she rejected him so that he could live a normal life.

 

When Tae-il realizes during his second law exam that Il-mae is marrying someone else to protect him, he rushes back to the wedding and begs for it to be annulled. The father tells Il-mae that he has lived a happy life with the memory of her mother always with him. The fiance/husband did not know how sick Il-mae was and agrees to annul the wedding. Tae-il says he wants to be by Il-mae's side until her last day while also studying medicine to find a cure. The last scene is Tae-il by Il-mae's side in the hospital, and she has a flashback of when they married and had their first kiss.

 

The story ends and you'll have to imagine what happened afterward.

 

 

 

I've been going back and forth between wanting to watch this movie and not. Watch this movie because of course, SYJ is on it. Not watch this movie because I read the reviews and apparently the misogyny is strong on this movie.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, slowpoked said:

 

I've been going back and forth between wanting to watch this movie and not. Watch this movie because of course, SYJ is on it. Not watch this movie because I read the reviews and apparently the misogyny is strong on this movie.

I first heard of SYJ this year while watching CLOY, and have since watched all 21 of her movies. She is a voice actor in two of the films. Crazy First Love seems weird to me, and I would put it as one of my least favorite SYJ films. It is difficult to figure out the overall story and character logic, which is why I watched it twice. Even the romance part of the film seems one-sided and unnatural.

 

Regarding misogyny, this film probably requires knowing Korean cultural values. The main thing though is that this story is told from the boy's viewpoint of his first and only love. SYJ's character Il-mae only appears in scenes related to the boy's story. Even in one scene where she is alone with her father, it is to explain to her father how she feels about the boy. SYJ is more of a supporting character for the story than a main character, although she is, of course, the "first love."

 

I watched this movie mainly because I was determined to watch and understand every SYJ movie. Otherwise, I can't recommend this movie.

 

Spoiler

One thing I wonder is if that slow motion scene of her coming out of the pool in a blue bikini is a nod to the Phoebe Cates scene in Fast Times.

 

11 hours ago, ElectricHearts said:

More CF news to come

 

 

 

I like the play on "Seri's Choice." I use Smart when in the Philippines and retain my number, but don't have a Signature plan. I wonder what they'll say or do on August 3?

Edited by Sushimi
Do not quote photos, thanks.
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https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/art/2020/07/688_293689.html
See what's next: Netflix reshapes Korean TV industry trends


By Lee Gyu-lee | 2020-07-31 


D567A99E-2C22-4E07-9B0B-C25213E7E130.jpg
Netflix has a strategy to acquire more Korean content. Screen captured from Netflix


While the Korean TV drama industry is witnessing a rapid change in its success formula ― shifting its emphasis from the domestic scene to the global market ― streaming giant Netflix is playing a major role, offering lucrative deals and a doorway to international traction that local production studios cannot resist.


And local viewership is no longer a key metric. 

 

Spoiler

FC5B8790-6739-4A95-9BAC-3D3E906BC79E.jpg

Actor Lee Min-ho from "The King: Eternal Monarch." / Courtesy of SBS


Star-studded TV series "The King: Eternal Monarch," which ended with a disappointing viewership rating of 8 percent, is the most recent example as it was able to reach its break-even point even before going to air.


The 32 billion won ($26.8 million) budget series reportedly recouped its total production cost from the broadcast deal with the SBS network and the overseas licensing agreement with Netflix, relieving pressure on the viewership rating in Korea. 


"Netflix approaches with undeniably good deals, so probably most of the production studios want to work with the company," a local production company official told The Korea Times, asking not to be named.


Netflix launched in Korea in 2016 and has implemented aggressive investment strategies to expand local content and market penetration. Industry tracker WiseApp estimated that Netflix had 3.28 million subscribers in April ― up from 1.42 million in April last year. 


In an effort to restrain Netflix from entering the domestic market, major terrestrial networks ― MBC, SBS and KBS ― made an informal agreement not to sell newly aired TV series to Netflix. 


But the arrangement ended in 2018 when SBS Content Hub sold the streaming rights for "Hymn of Death" to Netflix, as advertisement revenue for the three-part miniseries was hard to generate. The series became available on the platform worldwide on the same day it aired on SBS.


Since then, Netflix has secured shows from a number of broadcasters, paying a big portion of the series' production costs through global licensing deals. 


CAF89619-A5AE-4D17-997D-2B2CA1E1755F.jpg


This year, several TV series ― tvN's "It's Okay to Not Be Okay" and "Crash Landing on You," JTBC's "Itaewon Class" and SBS's "The King: Eternal Monarch" and "Hyena" ― were sold to Netflix for worldwide streaming, available on the same day they aired on TV. 


Korean media outfit CJ ENM and its subsidiary Studio Dragon even inked a three-year production and distribution agreement with Netflix to provide over 20 series and produce original series starting this year. 


JTBC subsidiary JTBC studios also signed a distribution partnership with Netflix under similar conditions. 


"Netflix values the power of storytelling as we believe it appeals beyond borders and across genres," Netflix told The Korea Times. "So, we intend to continue to deliver Korea's high-quality storytelling to our audiences worldwide." 

 

Netflix covered at least 65 percent of the 43 billion won ($36 million) production cost for tvN's 2018 blockbuster series "Mr. Sunshine." SBS's "Vagabond" collected about half its 25 billion won ($21 million) budget from Netflix while MBC's "Rookie Historian Goo Hae-ryung" received its entire 13 billion won ($11 million) budget from the company last year. 

 

Spoiler

C684BD28-C440-477A-A632-E841FB75BC51.jpg

Netflix picked up tvN's "It's Okay to Not Be Okay" to release on its platform on the same day as it was broadcast. Courtesy of tvN


And in doing so, the platform has become the most sought-after company to work with among local production companies. 


The production company official said Netflix's generous payments offer significant relief for the production. 


"When we produce a series, making the budget is always hard for many reasons, especially with a low viewership rating," the official said. "So when Netflix purchases the license, it means we can just get on track with the production."

 

Thanks to Netflix, the production studios now have another source of earnings, rather than solely relying on the networks. This frees the studios from tension with the local broadcasters and changes the dynamic of TV productions, says drama critic Yun Suk-jin, who is also a Korean literature professor at Chungbuk National University. 


"The networks always dominated the production process as they are the ones assigning the timeslot," Yun said. 


He added that this gave broadcasters the power to alter details, storylines, or even the concept of a series. "Dramas would only go into production if proposals were approved by the network, so (production companies) had limitations as they had no choice but to accept the network's demands," he explained.


This freedom from the pressures of the networks also creates better-quality dramas, according to the professor.


He said that since the networks cover only a portion of the production cost, ad revenue used to be another primary funding source for the studios. 


"Especially, small productions will put in an excessive amount of product placement to make a profit, which will downgrade the quality of the series," Yun said. 


C7BACA78-14E6-45F8-9D9E-325FE1C6889C.jpg
JTBC's "Itaewon Class," left, and tvN's "Crash Landing on You" are streamed worldwide on Netflix. Courtesy of JTBC and tvN


Another factor that makes Netflix popular is worldwide streaming. This offers a series the chance to gain international traction and shortens the tedious export process.


"Being a global streaming giant has a substantial advantage in the market," pop culture critic Kim Hern-sik said, adding that it opens up a new model for content exports. 


"In the past, the network or production company went 'door-to-door' with each overseas network to export a TV series," he said. "So it would take years and sometimes would fall apart along the way, which would just be a waste of time and money." 


As Netflix is available in over 190 countries, the network can now utilize it to appeal to other markets, which will have a "great impact on possible deals for remakes overseas." 


However, as the platform takes Korea by storm, its growing presence is also raising some concerns of excessive control over the local content market. 


"Netflix receives so many content proposals, so they get to review and select which to work on and turn down," the production company official said. 


The deep-pocketed company is likely to become the dominant source that monitors and selects the content available to audiences, shaping the market. 


Netflix has also been accused of "freeloading" in Korea's OTT (over-the-top) ecosystem for refusing to pay local telecom companies for network service use in Korea. This is seen as an unfair advantage as other local streaming services ― such as Seezn, Wavve and Watcha ― are required to pay. 

 

Spoiler

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A scene from tvN's drama "Hotel Del Luna," which will be remade in the U.S. Courtesy of tvN


Meanwhile, Studio Dragon is seeking to go beyond Netflix to secure its foothold in the global market. The company launched a U.S. branch earlier this year, becoming the first Korean production company to do so. 


It inked a co-production partnership deal with the American production company Skydance in February, announcing their first project, a U.S. remake of "Hotel Del Luna." 


"With the success of 'Hotel Del Luna,' we hope to leap forward in becoming a global premium drama studio," Studio Dragon said.

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