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Guest putasmileon

Japanese Discussion 日本語の討論会

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Guest stellabella

whoa dr jung you know both korean AND japanese?! amazing...

anyway, I was wondering. If i know korean, would it be easy for me to learn japanese? I'm thinking of possible taking it up later. Just curious as to how difficult it is to learn.

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Guest dr jung

to some one who knows both Japanese and Korean..

I was debating with my Japanese friend what the Korean equivelent of へis.

I kept saying its 에 , but he think it's 로

It's 에/헤. First one is the pronounciation for the preposition, and latter for the rest.

로 would be ろ (hiragana) ロ (katakana).

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It's 에/헤. First one is the pronounciation for the preposition, and latter for the rest.

로 would be ろ (hiragana) ロ (katakana).

no, I'm not talking about pronunciation, but rather the equivelent translation

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Guest dr jung

no, I'm not talking about pronunciation, but rather the equivelent translation

Oh. Well, I use it as ~(으)로 or ~에. it can be both

일본에 가자

日本へ行くよ

집으로 돌아간다

家へ帰る

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anyway, I was wondering. If i know korean, would it be easy for me to learn japanese? I'm thinking of possible taking it up later. Just curious as to how difficult it is to learn.

It wouldn't be hard for you to learn the grammar and such...But how hard it is in the end is going to depend on how well you can learn the kanji, because you're going to need to learn around 2000 of them, without them you have the reading ability of a Japanese sperm

Oh. Well, I use it as ~(으)로 or ~에. it can be both

일본에 가자

日本へ行くよ

집으로 돌아간다

家へ帰る

Are there any other uses of 로, is there any difference at all between 로 and 에? Because it might be that 에 is へ in Japanese while 로 is に. へ and に are not interchangeable in all situations, especially if we're talking about usage beyond directions, so it's important to make the distinction clear. (it also might be the same way in Korean)

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I was wondering how people remember the Hiragana characters? I'm taking Japanese class right now and its really hard for me to remember most of them. Is there something that anyone does to make them remember them faster? Sorry if my grammars bad. :vicx:

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Guest dr jung

I was wondering how people remember the Hiragana characters? I'm taking Japanese class right now and its really hard for me to remember most of them. Is there something that anyone does to make them remember them faster? Sorry if my grammars bad. :vicx:

Well, I think if you are in the beginning stage of learning, keep using it, practicing writing the characters, would help you remember. I mean, if you write them once, and then that's it, you obviously are not going to remember anything.

Whenever you have time, make a quick chart/table/etc, write whatever you remember. Then, if you have time to look at the actual hiragana chart, you can try to learn the ones that you forgot or something.

Practice makes everything perfect. :D

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I have a friend, shes a girl and she is 2 years older than me. I am 21 and shes 23.

In korean, if a girl is older than me i would call her nuna.

In Japanese, could I call her onesan? I know that means older-sister but could i use it as a friend also? Please let me know, i dont' want to call her my sister but i want to call her oneesan as reference to a girl older than me.

haha it'll probably make her laugh, but i want to try it.

so...could someone help me

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Guest mango_x

can someone tell me if the word 'kawai' has a meaning in japanese because i know that kawaii means cute and kowai means scary. hmm and i know there's a japanese piano company called kawai so can anyone tell me if it has a meaning in japanese

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can someone tell me if the word 'kawai' has a meaning in japanese because i know that kawaii means cute and kowai means scary. hmm and i know there's a japanese piano company called kawai so can anyone tell me if it has a meaning in japanese

no..the only way it's used would be as someone or someplace's name

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so...could someone help me

I'm pretty sure you can call her oneesan

I usually call my japanese (girls) friends neechan

or I would ad nee after their name ex: Hiromi-nee

But I would make sure she's okay with you calling her that.

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Japanese people don't usually call older girls 'oneesan', I've never seen it done before while living and studying there, and checked with some Japanese friends on it to be sure...Japan isn't as strict as Korea when it comes to age distinction, you'll see people calling friends 20 years older than them casually like they do people their age

It's more common, in a school or work setting, to call an older person 'senpai', but this still isn't used anywhere as much as things like nuna are in Korean. So be careful how you try to translate one culture into another, you might get weird looks. If you really feel you need to be polite, just stick with name-san, or if you want affectionate name then name-chan is ok too

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Can someone tell me the difference between 言う and 話すand how to use them? I'm a lil confused here. Thanks so much!

Btw, is it appropriate to ask in this thread...can someone recommend me good japanese-english(or E-J or with chinese) dictionary?

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Can someone tell me the difference between 言う and 話すand how to use them? I'm a lil confused here. Thanks so much!

Btw, is it appropriate to ask in this thread...can someone recommend me good japanese-english(or E-J or with chinese) dictionary?

言う - say

話す - speak

何を言いましたか? What did you say?

彼は話しましたか? Did he speak?

mostly the same differences as say / speak in English

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I'm taking beginners Japanese in university right now, just wondering how long it took you guy to memorize hiragana and katakana? (for someone non-native to Japanese)

and I need help with using ikimasu and kimasu in the right context

like if a mother was calling her son in the other room to come for dinner, would the son use ikimasu as in he's going? or kimasu as in he's coming?

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I'm taking beginners Japanese in university right now, just wondering how long it took you guy to memorize hiragana and katakana? (for someone non-native to Japanese)

and I need help with using ikimasu and kimasu in the right context

like if a mother was calling her son in the other room to come for dinner, would the son use ikimasu as in he's going? or kimasu as in he's coming?

depends on point of view

he's going to his mother from a neutral point of view

but from the mother's point of view he's coming...so it sounds like they'd want you to use kimasu here. ikimasu/kimasu usually depend on the location/direction in reference to the speaker

it should take you a week to memorize hiragana and katakana if you do it seriously, a few days if you're fast

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I'm taking beginners Japanese in university right now, just wondering how long it took you guy to memorize hiragana and katakana? (for someone non-native to Japanese)

it took me around 3 days to memorize hiragana but i have yet to learn katakana :D

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