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rubie last won the day on September 30 2018

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  1. October 11, 2019 PARK Chan-wook Eyes Adaptation of THE AX with Costa-Gavras as Producer Famed Korean Director Eyes English-Language Adaptation of Donald E. WESTLAKE’s Novel by Pierce Conran KOFIC Famed director PARK Chan-wook has revealed that he is preparing to make an English-language version of the 1997 novel ‘The Ax’ by Donald E. WESTLAKE, which was previously adapted in France by the French-Greek auteur Costa-Gavras in 2005. Director PARK explained his intentions during an open talk with Costa-Gavras which took place during the Busan International Film Festival this month. Director PARK explained that he has been working closely with Costa-Gavras and his producer wife Michèle RAY, who own the filming rights to the novel and will serve as producers of PARK’s eventual adaptation, which has been in development for several years. The story of ‘The Ax’ concerns a chemist with a family and a stable life who is suddenly made redundant and resolves to eliminate his competition as he navigates a difficult job market. Known for Old Boy (2003) and The Handmaiden (2016), director PARK most recently helmed the BBC miniseries The Little Drummer Girl, an adaptation of the John LE CARRE novel of the same name starring Florence PUGH, Alexander SKARSGARD and Michael SHANNON. Costa-Gavras is known for his classic political dramas, such as 1969’s Z, 1972’s State of Siege and his Hollywood masterpiece Missing with Sissy SPACEK and Jack LEMMON, released in 1982.
  2. October 13, 2019 Centennial of Korean cinema - From humble beginnings to mega hits This is the first in a series of articles highlighting the centennial of Korean cinema _ E.D_ By Lee Gyu-lee The Korea Times (refer for full-length article) A still featuring actor Song Kang-ho from "Snowpiercer" (2013), directed by Bong Joon-ho./ Korea Times file
  3. October 16, 2019 Kim Hyo-jin Reveals Husband Yoo Ji-tae and Son Source: StarNews via HanCinema.net Actress Kim Hyo-jin revealed her husband Yoo Ji-tae and her son Soo-in. She posted a picture on her Instagram on the 13th saying, "I asked them to give me a smile and this is what they gave me". The picture shows Yoo Ji-tae with his son in his arms and smiling widely towards the ceiling. Kim Hyo-jin married Yoo Ji-tae in 2011 and they have two sons. Yoo Ji-tae last appeared in the MBC drama "Different Dreams", which ended in July.
  4. October 16, 2019 Kim Hyo-jin Reveals Husband Yoo Ji-tae and Son Source: StarNews via HanCinema.net Actress Kim Hyo-jin revealed her husband Yoo Ji-tae and her son Soo-in. She posted a picture on her Instagram on the 13th saying, "I asked them to give me a smile and this is what they gave me". The picture shows Yoo Ji-tae with his son in his arms and smiling widely towards the ceiling. Kim Hyo-jin married Yoo Ji-tae in 2011 and they have two sons. Yoo Ji-tae last appeared in the MBC drama "Different Dreams", which ended in July.
  5. October 17, 2019 APSA to honor Korean films Source: INSIDE Korea JoongAng Daily Palme d’Or winner “Parasite” has been nominated for Best Feature Film at the 13th Asia Pacific Screen Awards (APSA), which will take place in Brisbane, Australia, on Nov. 21. “Underdog,” directed by Lee Choon-baek and Oh Sung-yoon, was nominated for Best Animated Feature Film, while Park Ji-hu, star of acclaimed indie film “House of Hummingbird” was nominated for Best Performance by an Actress. This year, the APSA will be recognizing Korean films in a number of ways. The official opening ceremony of the Asia Pacific Screen Forum on Nov. 19 will feature a performance from Sounds Across Oceans, described as an “intercultural ensemble musical performance to celebrate 100 years of Korean cinema.” The opening event will be followed by the Creative Collaborations panel the next day, which will explore creative opportunities between the Australian and Korean movie industries. Panel speakers include Zoe Sua Cho, producer of “House of Hummingbird.” By Kim Eun-jin
  6. Source: MrSunshineBD @MrSunshineBD Notice for public sale of Mr. Sunshine Blu-ray Sale starts on Oct. 17th Thursday 1 PM KST. ( Oct 16th 12:00 AM EST ) About 30 sets available. Price : 352,000 KRW Order link will be available thru official café (http://cafe.daum.net/MrSunshineBD) on the scheduled time.
  7. @peonie, thank you so much for the awesome translation.. it's just so perfect in understanding Lee Byung Hun as he reaches his 30th anniversary in the industry. It's like a prelude to the big year 2020 with 3 new movies and a drama series. Even though we've read a lot of BH interviews in the past, this latest Marie Claire interview is especially enlightening in revealing his views of making movies these days compared to his earlier days. It's good to know that these days he doesn't rest so much between work thus wasting precious movie offers. Also his view about treating the script as a story book as he try to understand the character plus his unforgettable experience being scolded endlessly as a rookie actor. We know that BH would love to experience acting with ease in a Hollywood but no matter how good he really is, the language is still an invisible barrier for him. It's not as fluid as acting in a Korean movie. Read some comments by non-fans who only saw him in GI Joe or Terminator and questioning why his acting is always highly-praised and getting numerous Best Actor awards. They definitely missed out on the best of his performances in Korean movies. Anyway, thank you again for the fantastic sharing and the fabulous translation. So many good & interesting points to read about BH that we can now read without any problems having to guess. We can never thank you enough! A mention at our twitter account ~
  8. October 9, 2019 ‘Parasite’ Star Song Kang-ho Has No Hollywood Plans Joan MacDonald Forbes Song Kang-ho holds the lucky stone that may change his family's fortune in 'Parasite.' CJ ENTERTAINMENT Song Kang-ho is perhaps Korea’s most relatable actor. Whether he’s playing a studious monarch in The King’s Letters, investigating crime in Bong Joon-ho’s Memories of Murder, or embodying the down-on-his-luck Kim Kae-taek in Bong’s latest film Parasite, Song demonstrates an unusual talent for emotionally connecting with viewers. That ability has earned him dozens of prestigious awards, including most recently being the first Asian actor to receive an Excellence Award at 72nd Locarno International Film Festival. Parasite, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, and is South Korea’s entry for Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards, has been described as an ensemble film, but Song is mesmerizing as the patriarch of the Kim family, whose only scheme for success may be to con the rich but naive Park family. It’s the fourth time Song has acted in a film directed by Bong. “There’s a lot of good chemistry between Director Bong and I,” said Song, while visiting New York City for the 57th New York International Film Festival. In Bong’s 2006 ecological horror film The Host, Song plays a man whose daughter is kidnapped by a monster. In Bong’s sci-fi futuristic film Snowpiercer, Song plays a poor man relegated to the rear of the super train that is humanity’s only hope. The actor and director enjoy working together. “I think the message he wants to convey in his films is very moving and also at the same he elicits performances that are very extraordinary,” said Song. “I think that combination is what makes him remarkable.” While Bong’s films are known for embodying social issues, such as protecting the environment, promoting animal rights, or making society more equitable, Song says he does not choose his roles based on their social messages. “I personally don’t like propaganda films,” he said. “Art has to be good for its own sake even when reflecting reality. All of Bong’s films have a strong sense of story to them and that’s what makes them so real and so beautiful.” In Parasite his character may be poor and lacking opportunities, but he still has his dignity. “When you look at the character I play, I don’t think he is a very unusual character,” said Song. “There’s nothing odd about him. He’s an ordinary character that can exist anywhere. The character is poor, but he tries very hard, and yet his desires are not fulfilled. It’s easy to identify with him.” Although Kim Ki-taek calmly makes the most of his limited circumstances, he’s eventually driven to a violent act, which might cause viewers to wonder what circumstances would justify such a response. The film does not answer the question for viewers, but for Kim Ki-taek, that uncrossable line is an affront to his dignity as a human being. “The final answer lies in everyone’s hearts,” said Song. “I do think that it’s a film about human dignity and certain lines are crossed that infringe upon that dignity. There’s a certain resistance that lies in this character, a point of resistance that lies in everyone.” Despite the recognition he’s earned as an actor and his friendship with fellow creatives, Song considers acting a lonely profession. “It’s not just me,” said Song.”I think this also applies to Hollywood actors and actresses. When you stand in front of the camera, it’s a very, very lonely moment. There is no one to help you out. Everybody can only stand by to watch, so that’s what makes it challenging and painful as well.” Whether he's a pauper or a king, viewers find it easy to identify with Song's characters. MEGABOX PLUS M Working in theater helped the critically acclaimed actor to cultivate his acting skills. “I did not have my acting skills trained in a professional school but I always appeared on theatrical stages ever since I was young,” said Song. “That’s how I gradually trained in my acting capacity. It wasn’t a long training but it was very intense.” Starring in a film that’s up for an Academy Award has not convinced the veteran actor that he wants to move to Hollywood. “I would like to pass on that opportunity to other actors,” said Song. “I think in such films I would disappear, so I will instead continue to use Korean films such as Parasite to express myself.” Song’s next film, Emergency Declaration, also features Lee Byung-hun, who appears in several Hollywood productions, including Red2 and Terminator: Genysis. The actors previously worked together in Park Chan-wook’s Joint Security Area and Kim Jee-woon’s The Good, the Bad, the Weird. “It’s a very commercial film of the disaster genre,” said Song. Song’s Emergency Declaration character will have to deal with an aviation disaster. It may be a different genre, but Song will do his best to make that character oh-so-easy to relate to.
  9. October 9, 2019 ‘Parasite’ Star Song Kang-ho Has No Hollywood Plans Joan MacDonald Forbes Song Kang-ho is perhaps Korea’s most relatable actor. Whether he’s playing a studious monarch in The King’s Letters, investigating crime in Bong Joon-ho’s Memories of Murder, or embodying the down-on-his-luck Kim Kae-taek in Bong’s latest film Parasite, Song demonstrates an unusual talent for emotionally connecting with viewers. That ability has earned him dozens of prestigious awards, including most recently being the first Asian actor to receive an Excellence Award at 72nd Locarno International Film Festival. Parasite, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, and is South Korea’s entry for Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards, has been described as an ensemble film, but Song is mesmerizing as the patriarch of the Kim family, whose only scheme for success may be to con the rich but naive Park family. It’s the fourth time Song has acted in a film directed by Bong. “There’s a lot of good chemistry between Director Bong and I,” said Song, while visiting New York City for the 57th New York International Film Festival. In Bong’s 2006 ecological horror film The Host, Song plays a man whose daughter is kidnapped by a monster. In Bong’s sci-fi futuristic film Snowpiercer, Song plays a poor man relegated to the rear of the super train that is humanity’s only hope. The actor and director enjoy working together. “I think the message he wants to convey in his films is very moving and also at the same he elicits performances that are very extraordinary,” said Song. “I think that combination is what makes him remarkable.” While Bong’s films are known for embodying social issues, such as protecting the environment, promoting animal rights, or making society more equitable, Song says he does not choose his roles based on their social messages. “I personally don’t like propaganda films,” he said. “Art has to be good for its own sake even when reflecting reality. All of Bong’s films have a strong sense of story to them and that’s what makes them so real and so beautiful.” In Parasite his character may be poor and lacking opportunities, but he still has his dignity. “When you look at the character I play, I don’t think he is a very unusual character,” said Song. “There’s nothing odd about him. He’s an ordinary character that can exist anywhere. The character is poor, but he tries very hard, and yet his desires are not fulfilled. It’s easy to identify with him.” Although Kim Ki-taek calmly makes the most of his limited circumstances, he’s eventually driven to a violent act, which might cause viewers to wonder what circumstances would justify such a response. The film does not answer the question for viewers, but for Kim Ki-taek, that uncrossable line is an affront to his dignity as a human being. “The final answer lies in everyone’s hearts,” said Song. “I do think that it’s a film about human dignity and certain lines are crossed that infringe upon that dignity. There’s a certain resistance that lies in this character, a point of resistance that lies in everyone.” Despite the recognition he’s earned as an actor and his friendship with fellow creatives, Song considers acting a lonely profession. “It’s not just me,” said Song.”I think this also applies to Hollywood actors and actresses. When you stand in front of the camera, it’s a very, very lonely moment. There is no one to help you out. Everybody can only stand by to watch, so that’s what makes it challenging and painful as well.” Working in theater helped the critically acclaimed actor to cultivate his acting skills. “I did not have my acting skills trained in a professional school but I always appeared on theatrical stages ever since I was young,” said Song. “That’s how I gradually trained in my acting capacity. It wasn’t a long training but it was very intense.” Starring in a film that’s up for an Academy Award has not convinced the veteran actor that he wants to move to Hollywood. “I would like to pass on that opportunity to other actors,” said Song. “I think in such films I would disappear, so I will instead continue to use Korean films such as Parasite to express myself.” Song’s next film, Emergency Declaration, also features Lee Byung-hun, who appears in several Hollywood productions, including Red2 and Terminator: Genysis. The actors previously worked together in Park Chan-wook’s Joint Security Area and Kim Jee-woon’s The Good, the Bad, the Weird. “It’s a very commercial film of the disaster genre,” said Song. Song’s Emergency Declaration character will have to deal with an aviation disaster. It may be a different genre, but Song will do his best to make that character oh-so-easy to relate to.
  10. October 9, 2019 ‘Parasite’ Star Song Kang-ho Has No Hollywood Plans Joan MacDonald Forbes Song Kang-ho holds the lucky stone that may change his family's fortune in 'Parasite.' CJ ENTERTAINMENT Song Kang-ho is perhaps Korea’s most relatable actor. Whether he’s playing a studious monarch in The King’s Letters, investigating crime in Bong Joon-ho’s Memories of Murder, or embodying the down-on-his-luck Kim Kae-taek in Bong’s latest film Parasite, Song demonstrates an unusual talent for emotionally connecting with viewers. That ability has earned him dozens of prestigious awards, including most recently being the first Asian actor to receive an Excellence Award at 72nd Locarno International Film Festival. Parasite, which won the Palme d’Or at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, and is South Korea’s entry for Best International Feature Film at the 92nd Academy Awards, has been described as an ensemble film, but Song is mesmerizing as the patriarch of the Kim family, whose only scheme for success may be to con the rich but naive Park family. It’s the fourth time Song has acted in a film directed by Bong. “There’s a lot of good chemistry between Director Bong and I,” said Song, while visiting New York City for the 57th New York International Film Festival. In Bong’s 2006 ecological horror film The Host, Song plays a man whose daughter is kidnapped by a monster. In Bong’s sci-fi futuristic film Snowpiercer, Song plays a poor man relegated to the rear of the super train that is humanity’s only hope. The actor and director enjoy working together. “I think the message he wants to convey in his films is very moving and also at the same he elicits performances that are very extraordinary,” said Song. “I think that combination is what makes him remarkable.” While Bong’s films are known for embodying social issues, such as protecting the environment, promoting animal rights, or making society more equitable, Song says he does not choose his roles based on their social messages. “I personally don’t like propaganda films,” he said. “Art has to be good for its own sake even when reflecting reality. All of Bong’s films have a strong sense of story to them and that’s what makes them so real and so beautiful.” In Parasite his character may be poor and lacking opportunities, but he still has his dignity. “When you look at the character I play, I don’t think he is a very unusual character,” said Song. “There’s nothing odd about him. He’s an ordinary character that can exist anywhere. The character is poor, but he tries very hard, and yet his desires are not fulfilled. It’s easy to identify with him.” Although Kim Ki-taek calmly makes the most of his limited circumstances, he’s eventually driven to a violent act, which might cause viewers to wonder what circumstances would justify such a response. The film does not answer the question for viewers, but for Kim Ki-taek, that uncrossable line is an affront to his dignity as a human being. “The final answer lies in everyone’s hearts,” said Song. “I do think that it’s a film about human dignity and certain lines are crossed that infringe upon that dignity. There’s a certain resistance that lies in this character, a point of resistance that lies in everyone.” Despite the recognition he’s earned as an actor and his friendship with fellow creatives, Song considers acting a lonely profession. “It’s not just me,” said Song.”I think this also applies to Hollywood actors and actresses. When you stand in front of the camera, it’s a very, very lonely moment. There is no one to help you out. Everybody can only stand by to watch, so that’s what makes it challenging and painful as well.” Whether he's a pauper or a king, viewers find it easy to identify with Song's characters. MEGABOX PLUS M Working in theater helped the critically acclaimed actor to cultivate his acting skills. “I did not have my acting skills trained in a professional school but I always appeared on theatrical stages ever since I was young,” said Song. “That’s how I gradually trained in my acting capacity. It wasn’t a long training but it was very intense.” Starring in a film that’s up for an Academy Award has not convinced the veteran actor that he wants to move to Hollywood. “I would like to pass on that opportunity to other actors,” said Song. “I think in such films I would disappear, so I will instead continue to use Korean films such as Parasite to express myself.” Song’s next film, Emergency Declaration, also features Lee Byung-hun, who appears in several Hollywood productions, including Red2 and Terminator: Genysis. The actors previously worked together in Park Chan-wook’s Joint Security Area and Kim Jee-woon’s The Good, the Bad, the Weird. “It’s a very commercial film of the disaster genre,” said Song. Song’s Emergency Declaration character will have to deal with an aviation disaster. It may be a different genre, but Song will do his best to make that character oh-so-easy to relate to. This interview was edited for length and clarity. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website. Joan MacDonald
  11. Source: taeri_yeosin After 1 year and ten days... Finally I see you again, Dongji . This morning, finally I received this beautiful package. My hand was trembling so much when I opened it every disc, page of photobook, and all the goodies are so beautifully crafted.... . I won't share any content from it here, because all the buyers are prohibited to post any contents, images or video. All that i could say, it's really worth for every penny and my waiting for it was not in vain....
  12. October 13, 2019 Movies, dramas become new lucrative business for S. Korean internet companies By Yeo Jun-suk The Korea Herald South Korea’s leading internet firms are seeking to boost their presence in the entertainment industry by capitalizing on online content popular here and overseas. Using their internet cartoons, K-pop streaming services and other web-based items, Naver and Kakao have been accelerating their efforts to monetize lucrative content by adapting them into movies and dramas. In addition to establishing drama studios and streaming platforms, the internet giants have acquired stakes in local entertainment companies to enhance cooperation with top artists and social media influencers. “Based on our business portfolio ranging from music to videos and other items, we will come up with more content that can expand the ecosystem,” said Kim Seong-soo, who leads Kakao’s entertainment unit Kakao M. Since its establishment in 2016 with the acquisition of Loen Entertainment, Kakao M has been expanding into content production. Popular movie stars -- such as Lee Byung-hun from the megahit drama “Mr. Sunshine” -- work with the company. Kakao M has also made a foray into the film business by acquiring Korean movie studios behind box office hits, including the studio that made “The Spy Gone North” and “Kundo: Age of the Rampant.” Source: taeri_yeosin After 1 year and ten days... Finally I see you again, Dongji . This morning, finally I received this beautiful package. My hand was trembling so much when I opened it every disc, page of photobook, and all the goodies are so beautifully crafted.... . I won't share any content from it here, because all the buyers are prohibited to post any contents, images or video. All that i could say, it's really worth for every penny and my waiting for it was not in vain....
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