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Ruyi's Royal Love In The Palace 如懿传 2018 (Currently broadcasting)

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11 hours ago, outsanity said:

 

I agree with many points in your comment! I don't agree with how ruthless Ling Fei sometimes is, but the things she do are so much more entertaining than the holier-than-thou attitude Ruyi had. The way Ling Fei rose from servant to empress is far more inspiring than watching Ruyi getting screwed over again and again. I wish the author would write a Ling Fei chronicle. She's way better with the "rise-to-power" trope than the romance one.

 

You are correct...Ling Fei's "rise-to-power" was interesting. I just hated how she treated Ling Yunche the most.  She wanted her cake (Ling Yunche, because he was sweet) and ice cream (Emperor, because he is sooooo cold). 

 

There is a drama called the Story of Yanxi Palace that ran at the same time as Ruyi that is about Ling Fei.  I have not watched it yet because I can't find an English sub to it.

 

11 hours ago, outsanity said:

In terms of who had a happy ending - I think Zhen Huan's ending is as happy as it gets. She lived to a ripe old age, her son became one of the most famous emperor of the dynasty and she remained on the top of the food chain for the rest of her life.  

 

Zhen Huan's story was great! And I didn't come to hate the player the Emperor was.  Chen Jianbin did a great job in getting me to like the player!! He was a smooth talker.  Wallace Huo did a superb job of getting me from liking his character to just hating his character.  I hated that he treated Ruyi!! Especially since he claimed to love her.

 

I did appreciate how the story went from Zhen Huan disliking Ruyi to defending Ruyi.  Zhen Huan at least had respect for her in the end.

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I was mad with Ruyi caracter for not been more agresive or as Lin Fei. But after seen the final episodes I get it Ruyi never wanted power she wanted love and familly. She keep her self true until the end and dye peacefully without any regret. And that is way moore than any other caracter in this drama. She was able to let go of everything and only left a letter to her sun no one else matters. Of course we would all have wanted to see a moore strong fighter Ruyi but she was not like that, she shoose different batles and roads to live. 

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9 hours ago, believed said:

Honestly, this seems to sum up my feelings about the drama as well, although I don't know how well it applies here because I found that the schemes inserted into this drama only succeeded because the others were too nice to fight back. Does that make the rise to power more or less legitimate? I guess that doesn't matter.

 

The schemes into this drama are a little subpar. Much of it relied on characters randomly losing their edge (because what happened to the awesome, asskicking Jia Fei?) or being too passive to fight back (Ruyi).

Strongly recommend you watch Zhen Huan Zhuan if you want an impressive rise-to-power trope by this writer.  It's basically the prequel, but featuring Zhen Huan (who is the empress dowager in Ruyi's Royal Love).

 

8 hours ago, tarjig said:

You are correct...Ling Fei's "rise-to-power" was interesting. I just hated how she treated Ling Yunche the most.  She wanted her cake (Ling Yunche, because he was sweet) and ice cream (Emperor, because he is sooooo cold). 

 

There is a drama called the Story of Yanxi Palace that ran at the same time as Ruyi that is about Ling Fei.  I have not watched it yet because I can't find an English sub to it.

 

 

Zhen Huan's story was great! And I didn't come to hate the player the Emperor was.  Chen Jianbin did a great job in getting me to like the player!! He was a smooth talker.  Wallace Huo did a superb job of getting me from liking his character to just hating his character.  I hated that he treated Ruyi!! Especially since he claimed to love her.

 

I did appreciate how the story went from Zhen Huan disliking Ruyi to defending Ruyi.  Zhen Huan at least had respect for her in the end.

 

Ling Fei had a lot of sharp rise-to-power and fall-from-powers. If only she kept things a little more consistent (been less heartless, been less reckless and treat others with more kindness) she could've been another Zhen Huan. She definitely had the intelligence and persona... but her temperament needs some polishing. 

 

I watched a bit of Yanxi Palace. It's worth watching. A complete opposition of Legend of Ruyi. 

 

The acting was definitely superb in both dramas! So is the accessories and props. 

 

Yeah, Zhen Huan is ultimately, the most likeable character, even in Legend of Ruyi. She evolved a little and frankly, she is on top of the food chain and she knew it. Didn't matter how powerful Fuca Empress was - she got pwned when she tried to oppose  Zhen Huan. Didn't matter how powerful Ling Fei got, it was Zhen Huan who ultimately helped take her down. 

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Just some trivia...the show is really abit unlucky. Just when it ended and usually its feedback and drama news would be hot topics on china internet, Zhao Liying's marriage occupied every space. Just before this was Dilireba's win at the Golden Eagle award. And before that was Fan Bingbing's scandal.

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2 minutes ago, believed said:

Can someone tell me what happens to Ling Fei in the end?

 

Tortured for years by constantly feeding her poison and curing her. 

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18 hours ago, Cedric Ong said:

Just some trivia...the show is really abit unlucky. Just when it ended and usually its feedback and drama news would be hot topics on china internet, Zhao Liying's marriage occupied every space. Just before this was Dilireba's win at the Golden Eagle award. And before that was Fan Bingbing's scandal.

It was on the top hot topic list for 2 days straight then got overtaken by Zanilla's marriage announcement 

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@outsanity...Ruyi is, for the lack of a better word, dumb....

 

Ruyi's love and patience died when she decided to cut her hair, a taboo, to clearly express her intentions to breakaway n severe ties with her husband... even dared to cut off and  burn her picture.

 

She realised there no longer exist trust between them which is what love is all about. I feel she did the right thing.

 

 

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On 10/15/2018 at 8:55 PM, outsanity said:

 

I agree with many points in your comment! I don't agree with how ruthless Ling Fei sometimes is, but the things she do are so much more entertaining than the holier-than-thou attitude Ruyi had. The way Ling Fei rose from servant to empress is far more inspiring than watching Ruyi getting screwed over again and again. I wish the author would write a Ling Fei chronicle. She's way better with the "rise-to-power" trope than the romance one.

 

Ultimately, this is a love/romance story and not a rise-to-power story the way Zhen Huan was (I can't stop comparing the two because they were written by the same writer and whatnot), but it tried to do too much and ended up falling short of delivering a memorable message. Legend of Zhen Huan delivered some powerful messages about learning from your mistakes, not to be too arrogant, being careful about who you trust, the cost of power and so on. We don't learn anything from Legend of Ruyi except let's sacrifice everything for some abusive richard simmons who's not worth a second thought. Hard pass. Ruyi is everything a person should not aspire to be.  

 

But this is not to say that the drama is a bad one. The acting is truly top notch. Every character felt alive and I think the actors/actresses were extremely fitting. I loved Ling Fei's witch-y-ness, love Ruyi's stoicism and subtlety, love how the emperor was portrayed and love Jin Zhong's evilness. 

 

In terms of who had a happy ending - I think Zhen Huan's ending is as happy as it gets. She lived to a ripe old age, her son became one of the most famous emperor of the dynasty and she remained on the top of the food chain for the rest of her life.  

I found Ruyi's character and story had a lot to learn from. In contrast I don't see her being a "do everything for the one you love and suffer" at all. It may begin in that way, but is way more nuanced than that and that should be noted. She defies the steroetype that all concubines want to be empresses, that becoming empress is the epitome of a good life, that love will win the day. She cuts her hair in defiance, as a show of her own free will. Even after she is offered the empress treasures again, she refuses them. It is not because she is dumb, it's because she values her freedom more after all she has experienced.

 

Ruyi's story has a lot of common tropes and plotlines, but as a main character she is more than "spunky, 100% good, heroine" who can overcome everything and has no faults. I appreciate a main character who does not pursue status. Ruyi is a story of loss that is for sure. Loss of happiness, meaning, trust, and for what? For titles, for "honor", for riches  and for high reputations. Her last speech before she died explained all that. She ridiculed the system that they lived in and the senseless loss of life. She acknowledges that she was never meant for palace life and she finally refuses to follow what is expected of her.

 

She is not helpless or hopeless, her defiance, although it gets her punished, is her free will. I love that it doesn't end with a clearly "happy" ending. Ruyi's actions even to her last day were empowering in my opinion. There are a lot of layers they created about relationships between sisters, mothers, friends, children, and lovers that was refreshing. That relationships change, whether we intend them to or not. It's not a perfect drama, but there is a lot that Ruyi's love in the palace addresses and makes one think about.

Edited by JennV
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I finally finished watching this drama (phew) what an emotionally draining one it was! I felt as if I was on this journey with Ru Yi as well...

Her demise was dignified on her terms, albeit sad. I cried so hard when she sort of said her last farewell to the Emperor. 

He kept making her empty promises while she remained steadfast and true to him...until of course, he kept disappointing her time and time again. Her cutting off her hair was her last stance. She was done. I actually applauded her when she did that LoL.

 

The Emperor is no different to men of today, uncomfortable with a strong woman and only care for their ego. She was too good for him tbh. And despite being wronged countless times, she stayed composed. I've such admiration for her, she was truly a woman ahead of her time. It's all just really tragic....

 

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On 10/20/2018 at 9:02 PM, JennV said:

I found Ruyi's character and story had a lot to learn from. In contrast I don't see her being a "do everything for the one you love and suffer" at all. It may begin in that way, but is way more nuanced than that and that should be noted. She defies the steroetype that all concubines want to be empresses, that becoming empress is the epitome of a good life, that love will win the day. She cuts her hair in defiance, as a show of her own free will. Even after she is offered the empress treasures again, she refuses them. It is not because she is dumb, it's because she values her freedom more after all she has experienced.

 

Ruyi's story has a lot of common tropes and plotlines, but as a main character she is more than "spunky, 100% good, heroine" who can overcome everything and has no faults. I appreciate a main character who does not pursue status. Ruyi is a story of loss that is for sure. Loss of happiness, meaning, trust, and for what? For titles, for "honor", for riches  and for high reputations. Her last speech before she died explained all that. She ridiculed the system that they lived in and the senseless loss of life. She acknowledges that she was never meant for palace life and she finally refuses to follow what is expected of her.

 

She is not helpless or hopeless, her defiance, although it gets her punished, is her free will. I love that it doesn't end with a clearly "happy" ending. Ruyi's actions even to her last day were empowering in my opinion. There are a lot of layers they created about relationships between sisters, mothers, friends, children, and lovers that was refreshing. That relationships change, whether we intend them to or not. It's not a perfect drama, but there is a lot that Ruyi's love in the palace addresses and makes one think about.

@JennVThank you for your post, I love it and could not have written it better myself. The character of Ruyi for me is the epitome of strength. She had endurance, patience as well as the intelligence and the will to live honestly while devoted to her duties as the empress, mother and friend. Her role was written as that of a woman who became an empress, would have lived in that century with dignity. Is killing, stealing, lying to gain the favor of the emperor considered strength? Is a woman in a high position bullying those in the lower ranks of societal position considered strong? The fact that she defied all convention and stayed strong to her heart's truth is powerful. 

 

Concubines as featured in the drama were meticulously selected from noble families and sent to the forbidden city to serve the emperor. At that time in history, the selected must have considered it an honor and obligation, the chance and duty to advance the position of their families and duty to the empire through "service" of the emperor. These young women full of idealism and ambition, soon found out that they are only pawns/political hostages to be moved and used in a game designed and played for the sake of the emperor and his empire. Some of them may not ever, even lay eyes on the emperor and lead dreary lives forgotten in some corner of the forbidden city. And for those who were graced with the attention of the emperor, they got thrown into a maelstrom of deadly competition to gain measly favors from the emperor and become victims of his inconstant moods and heart. To be in power, one must gain the trust of the emperor and no matter what he does one must be one with him. Such is the false power of women only through the favor of the emperor, it is power that is borrowed and begged for. Ruyi in this drama had true power and strength, she followed her heart, mind and will. 

 

Qianlong was written in history to have a glorious and brilliant political life in his reign as the emperor but in his later years became spoiled and complacent and placed his trust in corrupt officials which ushered the beginning and decline of the Qing empire. 

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This was the 18th century featured in the drama after all. Qianlong in this drama, by the mid episodes, is in his prime, he has conquered a big slice of the pie, is emperor of one of the biggest empires of the world to the south bordering Vietnam, and tributary kingdoms like Korea, to up north of Tibet, Mongolia to borders of Nepal, Turkestan and nations bordering Russia. He has to rule/oversee his kingdom. He led military campaigns and was said to be a brilliant military strategist but was also known to be a ruthless conquistador who decimated the populace of the conquered land. It was also his duty to produce heirs from many concubines/wives. He sees women of the harem, his wives and family (children) except for his mother, as subjects not eguals and why he thought of Empress Fuca as the perfect empress because she was obedient to the emperor's will. He also said in one of the episodes that his children and members of his family can become his enemies. Which is well depicted in the episodes, if one of his wives is a member of a warring clan or deemed as a spy then woe to that woman and her children if any, and if a child such as the 4th prince has ambitions to be crown prince and start soliciting for political support as in Jia-the mother's case, then that child is thrown out of the palace and movements restricted, mother demoted. Consort Shu whom the emperor learned to be a spy of his mother, was given the birth control medicine to prevent pregnancy, by order of the emperor and was told/lied to by the emperor the medecine was to induce pregnancy. His wives and his harem, a political body but a very small part of his conquered empire and expected the empress to run it efficiently even when he was the one who caused the problem as in lying, spying or abetting the wrongs of a favored wife. He can't admit he is wrong because of who he deems of himself as...."The Son Of Heaven". Even when he starts regretting and explaining his hurtful actions, there is always a "but" in the sentence, to excuse himself. He then makes promises to break it over and over.

His attitude and his views especially towards his harem are a source of contention between the emperor and his wife the 2nd empress, Ruyi, who thinks that a woman has as much equal say in their relationship as his wife and empress. Ruyi has to put on many hats for the emperor. She sometimes is the comforter when he is sad, tired and bothered by dreams of his mortality, a political advisor/state secretary/mother of the nation/harem manager/problem solver. But when Ruyi does do her duty as his wife and empress and confronts him of his wrong doing, the emperor can't admit it and lashes at her for daring to point out his bad behavior. 2 minutes later, he realizes he is wrong and runs back to Ruyi with promises to be good, not to worry, he will protect her then forgets his promise 2 minutes later. Little by little Ruyi got exhausted, discontented and disappointed. The day came when she realized love is gone and no reason to stay by the emperor's side and left with a decisive and unforgetable statement/she cut her hair.

 

I also think Ruyi had a mindset that was a bit ahead of her time. I remember in the early episodes when she was still newly married to a newly crowned emperor, she went to visit Sir Lang the painter. She asked him about how married people conducted themselves in the west. Sir Lang told her that marrriage in the west consisted of one man and one woman. That when love faded between the two that a woman can ask to leave the marriage and so does a man. Of course in that century even in the west, women did not have the indepencence as men were still the base of power even in a monogamous marriage. However what Sir lang pointed out about monogamous marriage, was taken to heart by Ruyi. Eunuch Li Yu and maid Arou were with Ruyi and they both thought Sir Lang was crazy or was making up stories. Ruyi then went to the emperor and brought out the subject of monogamous marriage and mostly the choice of a woman to leave the marriage if there is no longer caring between the married couple which horrified maid Arou thinking that her mistress will offend the emperor and will be punished. The emperor scolded Ruyi for listening to such nonsense and forbade her to talk to Sir Lang.

 

Ruyi was not cut to be a woman that would cater blindly to the capricious demands of the emperor but a woman dedicated to her duty and love of her family, friends and people even her flighty husband/emperor because at the time she thought it was what she had to do. In the end she realized she did have a choice. She chose to leave of her own accord. She cut her hair, told the emperor flowers bloom and flowers fall.... goodbye.

 

Some of the characters who did have character development especially Hailan did so through the counsel and encouragement of Ruyi. It was Ruyi who protected Hailan in the beginning but when Hailan went knocking at the doors of the cold palace crying and fearful, Ruyi told Hailan that she must get herself together and do what she has to do to protect herself and preserve her life, that strength starts from within, from her own viewpoint not from others. That was the start of Hailan's growth. Li Yu the eunuch was bullied by his supervisors just because he was smart and the emperor noticed it. He was "punished" by his superiors and told to kneel in the snow in the cold where he got frost bitten in his knees and Ruyi found him then. It was Ruyi who took him to her palace and treated his wounds e even when the young Li Yu thought that it was not appropriate for her to do so since he was a lowly eunuch and she noble woman. Ruyi then counseled Li Yu to act lowkey because the emperor already noted how smart Li Yu was and that was what really mattered. Li Yu slowly gained the approval of his supervisors and climbed the ranks to later become the head eunuch in the palace. Ruyi was the one who noticed the crush of Doctor Jiang on Suoxin and helped with the budding romance of the two. She was the one who recommended that Suoxin and Dr Jiang be married when the emperor had another man in mind to bethroth to Suoxin. Ruyi reminded the emperor subtly that Dr Jiang can take care of Suoxin and the wounds in her legs from the unjust punishment meted her by the emperor. It was Ruyi who listened to the broken hearted and drunken Ling Lunche who poured out his sorrows and who became her friend who protected her in the cold palace. She was the one who advised Shu to stop taking the medicine the doctor was giving her and it was her who advised Princess Rong who was trying to starve herself to death protesting being a tribute to the emperor from her homeland. Ruyi was the one who got her to find the will to live the best way she can in the forbidden city. She saved Rongpei from being brutally abused by the eunuchs and took her in as her maid to replace Suoxin. All these people were a testament to the strength of Ruyi's character.

 

This drama is not about rise to power,  it is about the budding, blooming, and fading of love. The hopes, the growth, the sharing of love through hardships, prosperity and blessings. It is about the hard learned realization of a love lost and choices made in the aftermath. Ruyi in the end chose freedom. She let go. She was sick and dying but she was free and at peace.  

 

I love this drama most of all for the dialogues between the major characters and the songs and music that fit the mood of the drama especially after a rewatch when the edits were done. It is worth the re watch

 

Sorry for the long post. Drama is a poetry in action.

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Episode 48 before her coronation as empress Ruyi had a talk with the Empress Dowager:

 

The dialogue in this episode between Ruyi and the Empress Dowager explains the drama and the title of the drama Ruyi's Love in The Palace succinctly. It is what this drama is all about. Ruyi said she is unclear of how to walk the path of an empress but she is very clear about her heart that she wants to be by the side of the man she cares deeply about to soothe his loneliness and calm his fears.

 

Empress Dowager's wise reply when Ruyi asked her if she ever wanted to love and be loved by the late emperor: Dowager said, the emperor will never be one woman's husband. The empress is also his subject and servant. The emperor's heart is the hardest to grasp and in this world and the least to trust.

 

This conversation expressed precisely the premise and heart of the drama and the different worldviews of Ruyi and the emperor as perhaps a warning to a bittersweet ending. There is no other way for the drama to end.

 

It also explains why Zhen Zhuan was so successful on her climb to power. She had no illusions of what the position and especially the heart of an emperor was all about.

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On 12/1/2018 at 6:34 PM, zenya22 said:

I love this drama most of all for the dialogues between the major characters and the songs and music that fit the mood of the drama especially after a rewatch when the edits were done. It is worth the re watch

 

Were there edits to the drama? I also want to rewatch the drama but I don't think I can stand rewatching Yanwan... I read somewhere the reason for the long filming duration was due to it supposedly having more episodes. But many were cut due to SARFT or to fit the broadcasting schedule.

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27 minutes ago, Sobayaki said:

 

Were there edits to the drama? I also want to rewatch the drama but I don't think I can stand rewatching Yanwan... I read somewhere the reason for the long filming duration was due to it supposedly having more episodes. But many were cut due to SARFT or to fit the broadcasting schedule.

What I meant was the dialogues in the drama were edited. It got easier for me to watch after the rewatch and the I could appreciate the exchanges between the characters. Some of my favorites were the confrontation between the emperor and Consort Hui before she died. That was well done. The conversation between Zhe Zhuan and Ruyi before she became an empress and Zhen Zhuan warned Ruyi "the emperor's heart belongs to no one and is the least to trust". and many others especially the confrontation between Ruyi and the emperor before she cut her hair when she did not hold back and many others. Anyway, for me because of the re watch, I loved the drama and the character of Ruyi more. This drama is up there with NIF  for me. 

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