Quantcast
Jump to content
thunderbolt

Park Hae-il 박해일

Recommended Posts

August 29, 2017

 

The Faster, the Higher
The Time Taken by Surpassing 10 Million Viewers

 

by CHO Meanjune / KoBiz

oKuaLMZQLGXPpLlZxRGf.jpg

 

The speed at which popular Korean films are passing the 10,000,000 viewer “blockbuster” mark has tripled. At least this is the case in a simple, parallel comparison of the time it took Silmido (2003), the first Korean film to accomplish the 10 million admissions feat, and A Taxi Driver, the 15th and most current film to do so. The amount of days needed for a film to become a blockbuster has gradually and steadily been decreasing over the past 15 years with a few, but notable deviations. The fastest to reach the over 10 million admissions mark is Roaring Currents (2014), becoming the highest grossing local film of all time with 17,615,039 moviegoers while CHOI Dong-hoon’s independent fighter action flick Assassination (2015) surpassed 10 million viewers on the 70th anniversary of Korea’s liberation from Japan on August 15th, 2015.

 

There is a close correlation between the time taken to exceed 10 million viewers and the number of screens. Masquerade (2012) and Miracle in Cell No.7 (2013), which had 810 and 787 screens respectively, took more than 30 days to surpass the milestone while The Thieves (2012), which was shown on 1,072 screens, managed the feat in only 22 days. The three Korean movies that surpassed the 10 million viewer mark within 20 days all started off with more than 1,500 screens. Among the 10 million viewer toppers, TRAIN TO BUSAN (2016) recorded the highest screen share with 1,788 screens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone,  THE FORTRESS will be released on October 3 with the promos gearing full speed now. There're some updates, pics and related info & upcoming events posted at the movie thread. With the strong ensemble of cast, this seems like a really well-made feature and hopefully the movie will be well-received especially during the Chuseok holidays when it opens nationwide. Come share & post at THE FORTRESS thread as well. All are welcomed!

 

Published on September 13, 2017 by cine21

 

Ko Soo x Park Hae Il x Park Hee Soon x Lee Byung Hun Namhansanseong | CINE21 1123 Cover Story Scene

 

.

Source: CINE21

 

Cover No.1123     2017-09-19 ~ 2017-09-26

 

20170919_1.jpg

 

20170919_2.jpg

 

20170919_3.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo List: Dynamic Acting Studio, Seoul  @d.a.studio_korea

 

Talented, admirable and respectable Korean actors

 

#HwangJungMin #JeonDoYeon # ChoJinWoong # ChunWooHee
#NaMoonHee #YooHaeJin #HanSukKyu # KimHyeSoo 
#SongKangHo #SulKyungGu# MoonSoRi #KwakDoWon 
#OhDalSu #BaeDooNa #JoSeungWoo #KimHyeJa  
#LeeSunGyun #GongHyoJin # KimYoonSeok #JangJinYoung 
#LeeByungHun #KimYunJin #GoHyunJung #ParkHaeIl

 

21910783_269084530264648_331051539395248

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo: CJ Entertainment USA @cjent_usa 

 

THE FORTRESS International Character Poster (re-post from the movie thread)

 

DKsH8UZVAAAGYI4.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all...

I just noticed Park Hae Il work( too late) when i watched My mother the mermaid. I was so captivated by Park Hae il acting in there plus he was so so so handsome....omg, why in the world that i was so too late to noticed him?

 

From now on i will watch his work one by one...i am so excited.

 

Thank you so much all for the info, clip and picture of him...:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More movie updates at THE FORTRESS thread :)


October 8, 2017

 

[Herald Interview] Why Park Hae-il is called a ‘blank sheet’

 

Hailed as one of Korea’s most versatile actors, Park takes on role of struggling Joseon king

 

Directors have called Park Hae-il a “blank sheet,” an actor who completely transforms through his roles. With boyish features and a difficult-to-fathom aura about him, Korean film fans say he possesses a Janus-like charm, similar to the Roman god of duplicity -- you can’t quite tell whether he embodies good or evil.

 

Park says he’s familiar with the description. “Director Yim Soon-rye told me I was like a white canvas that could become any color, after filming ‘Waikiki Brothers,’” he said at an interview Thursday at a cafe in Palpan-dong, Seoul, referring to his first film.

 

Park debuted as a musical actor in 1995, then crossed over to film in 2001.

 

His filmography is diverse. He played an ambiguous murder suspect in Bong Joon-ho’s mystery drama “Memories of Murder” (2003), and a shameless womanizer in the romantic comedy “Rules of Dating” (2005). In “A Muse” (2012), a 30-something Park played a 70-year-old poet attracted to a high school student. In 2013, Park played a slacker film director who moves back in with his mother.

 

image
Park Hae-il (CJ Entertainment)

 

In the historical drama “The Fortress,” which hit local theaters Tuesday, Park takes on the daunting task of portraying Joseon’s King Injo at his most vulnerable. The film is set during the 1636 Chinese invasion of Joseon, when the king is forced to retreat to

 

Namhansanseong, a mountain fortress southeast of Seoul. Under siege, King Injo is faced with the choice of either preserving the lives of his people by surrendering or resisting at the risk of being wiped out by an incomparably powerful army. 

 

“He’s a very suspecting and anxious character,” Park said of his rendition of King Injo.

 

Park says he’s not an actor who can slip comfortably into his roles. “I’m not agile enough to be joking at one point and then suddenly begin shooting. I tried to maintain (Injo’s) anxiety off-screen as well.”

 

image
Park Hae-il (CJ Entertainment)

 

The strain is palpable throughout the film. The camera frequently closes in on Park’s nervous face as King Injo tries to make the right decision amid a sea of diverging arguments raised by his advisers -- choosing between survival and dignity.

 

The story of King Injo’s eventual surrender is a well-known but distressing episode in Korean history. “It’s a sad part of history and perhaps one that we don’t really want to show the world. … But it’s not every day that as an actor, you come across a script that has this serious an approach to history, which is why I decided to take on the role,” Park said.

 

By Rumy Doo (doo@heraldcorp.com)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

March 19, 2018

 

SONG Kang-ho and PARK Hae-il to Reunite for Period Drama

JEON Mi-sun to Co-Star in Directorial Debut of THE THRONE Screenwriter

 

by Pierce Conran / KoBiz

 

KLMetvQUYpeaQtJRyfbU.jpg

 

Twelve years after appearing in the blockbuster monster movie The Host (2006) together, actors SONG Kang-ho and PARK Hae-il are set to reunite on screen in the upcoming period drama Naratmalssami (Korean title), to be financed and distributed by Megabox Plus M, the film will mark the directing debut of experienced producer CHO Chul-hyun.

 

SONG will take on the role of King Sejong, the fourth King of the Joseon Dynasty, who is credited with creating Hangul, the Korean writing system. PARK will play a monk that assisted the King in his aims but whose contributions are not properly recognized in historical records.

 

Filming will kick off for the project during the second half of this year. Before that, SONG will take part in the production of Parasite, the new film by BONG Joon-ho, which begins filming in April. Meanwhile, PARK Hae-il is currently filming the drama High Society with Su Ae. SONG and PARK have acted together in both The Host and Memories of Murder (2003).

 

Appearing alongside the former collaborators will be JEON Mi-sun, recently seen in Hide and Seek (2013) and THE LAST RIDE (2016).

 

Though CHO Chul-hyun is new to the director’s chair, he has been active as a producer for 20 years with several hits to his name, including Hi, Dharma (2001) and several films by LEE Joon-ik. He also wrote LEE’s period drama The Throne (2015).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

August 22, 2018

 

Actor Park Hae-il

Actor Park Hae-il


South Korean actor Park Hae-il, who stars in the upcoming movie "High Society," poses during an interview in Seoul on Aug. 22, 2018. The flick about an upper-class couple will be released nationwide on Aug. 29. (Yonhap) (END)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

August 26, 2018

 

August Movie Star Brand Reputation Rankings Revealed


Source: Soompi  by esspee

 

Spoiler

August Movie Star Brand Reputation Rankings Revealed

 

The Korean Business Research Institute has revealed the brand reputation rankings for film actors for the month of August!

 

The institute analyzed 209,364,728 pieces of big data from July 24 to August 25 and analyzed consumer participation, media coverage, interaction, and community awareness indexes of 50 popular movie stars.

 

As a result, Ha Jung Woo came in first place with a brand reputation index of 10,557,972 and a 376.28 percent increase compared to June.

 

In second place was Joo Ji Hoon who scored a brand reputation index of 8,741,657 and saw an increase of 1,014.48 percent from his index in June.

 

Lee Sung Min came in third place with a total brand index of 7,795,459, which is 1,106.98 percent increase from June.

 

Goo Chang Hwan, the chief of the Korean Business Institue, stated, “As a result of the August 2018 movie star brand reputation rankings, film actor Ha Jung Woo recorded first place. After analyzing the movie star brand category big data and comparing it to the 120,450,353 pieces of big data from June, there was a 73.82 percent increase.”

 

He continued, “‘Along with the Gods,’ which achieved 10 million moviegoers, led the film brand consumption, and all the indexes related to brand reputation increased.”

 

The link analysis for Ha Jung Woo showed words like “amazing,” “surprising,” and “crazy” ranking high, while keywords ”Along with the Gods,” “Kim Yong Bae,” and “Cha Yeon Woo” were highly associated.

 

Check out the top 30 below!

 

1. Ha Jung Woo
2. Joo Ji Hoon
3. Lee Sung Min
4. Park Seo Joon
5. Park Bo Young
6. Gong Yoo
7. Soo Ae
8. Kim Tae Ri
9. Hwang Jung Min
10. Han Ji Min
11. Kwak Si Yang
12. Kim Hyun Soo
13. Park Hae Il
14. Lee Kwang Soo
15. Kim Hyang Gi
16. Song Ji Hyo
17. Kim Young Kwang
18. Ma Dong Seok
19. Kim Da Mi
20. Kim Dong Wook
21. Son Ye Jin
22. Jin Ki Joo
23. Lee Jin Wook
24. Kim Da Mi
25. Ra Mi Ran
26. Jo Jin Woong
27. Kim Tae Hoon
28. Lee Byung Hun
29. Kim Sang Ho
30. Hyun Bin


Source (1) (2)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

February 14, 2019

 

SONG Kang-ho and PARK Hae-il Wrap Period Drama
THE THRONE Scribe Moves Up to Director’s Chair

 

by Pierce Conran KOFIC

 

eXMYZiMVilZaFTRXjpBa.jpg

 

The upcoming period drama Naratmalssami (Korean title), which sees stars SONG Kang-ho and PARK Hae-il reunite on the big screen, completed production on January 31. The project makes the feature directing debut of The Throne (2015) scribe CHO Chul-hyun.

 

The period drama will see SONG play the famed King Sejong, the fourth King of Joseon Dynasty, who is best known as the inventor of the Korean writing system Hangeul. The film will follow the monarch as he invents the revolutionary system with the help of a monk (played by PARK), whose contribution has fallen by the wayside in many historical records.

 

SONG was on screens as recently as December as the title character of WOO Min-ho’s period crime drama The Drug King (2018) and will be back before audiences among the cast of BONG Joon-ho’s upcoming film Parasite later this year. PARK Hae-il was last seen in ZHANG Lu’s Ode to the Goose (2018), one of the gala presentations at last year’s Busan International Film Festival last October. Meanwhile, the actors have had several memorable meetings on screen in the past, in BONG Joon-ho’s works Memories Of Murder (2003) and The Host (2006).

 

The main financier and distributor behind Naratmalssami is Megabox Plus M, which had specialized in mid-budget films until last year’s Chuseok holiday period, when it released its first big-budget film FENGSHUI (2018), another period drama. Their latest tentpole, which chronicles the tireless efforts of the people behind Korea’s most prized cultural asset, is expected to find its way to theaters this summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...