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  1. Gwanghae, The Man Who Became King 광해, 왕이 된 남자 Masquerade Nationwide Release September 13, 2012 Starring: Lee Byung Hun, Han Hyo Joo, Ryu Seung Ryong, Jang Gwang, Shim Eun Kyung, Kim In Kwon Masquerade Gross Production Cost: KRW 10 billion | Historical Fiction | Directed by Choo Chang-min | Starring Lee Byung-hun, Ryu Seung-ryong, Han Hyo-joo, Kim In-kwon, Jang Gwang and Shim Eun-kyoung Key fact: A triple role for Lee Byung-hun Storyline: Ha-seon, a common performer, lives for ten days disguised as Prince Gwanghae, who has been threatened with a possible poisoning. Crucial Scene: Tension grows when ‘the real king’ and ‘the fake king’ meet each other, Lee Byung-hun playing both of them. Notable Remark: “This is a serious discourse on the image of a leader that contemporary times call for, but the voice is rather humorous throughout. Why do politicians lack the simple logic that even a common street performer can figure out?” - Producer Won Dong-yeon Storm Shadow Meets Slapstick Comedy Lee Byung-hun plays three roles in the film: the performer Ha-seon, Prince Gwanghae and of course Ha-seon as he pretends to be Prince Gwanghae. The crucial aspect of his acting is the difference he can create between the characters. Won Dong-yeon, CEO of REALies thought, "Lee Byung-hun is the only one who can play this difficult role," as soon as he read the scenario. He added, “Acting as Prince Gwanghae and Ha-seon might be easy, but it is a different story when one actor has to simultaneously play as both of them in a single scene, which he managed to do quite well. By virtue of his abilities, not a single scene of the film gets boring.” Lee Byung-hun was working on G.I. Joe: Retaliation in Hollywood when casting decision were being made. Producer Won Dong-yeon and Director Choo Chang-min didn’t hesitate to fly to Los Angeles to meet him. Yet, Lee Byung-hun was not sure if he could act in a comedy film. Won Dong-yeon said, “This film contains slapstick comedy. I knew he was worried because he had usually played serious characters up to this point. On the other hand, I also knew how humorous he is. All he needed to do was show his true nature.” After Lee Byung-hun became a Hollywood star, he was ironically pushed far from the public. However, Won Dong-yeon quelch the existing prejudice against him and said, “Once you watch this film, he will look like the guy next door. You will feel very familiar with him. He dares do whatever he can. He shows his butt and rolls on the ground.” Most of the scenes in Masquerade in the palace. Therefore the space of the palace becomes a very important element throughout the film. Scenes were actually shot at some of the real historical palaces in Seoul including Gyeongbok Palace, Changdeok Palace and Gyeonghee Palace. Only minimal computer graphics were used for background effects. Although the film is not a fusion of new and old but a legitimate historical drama, it aims at offering an eloquent and modern visuality. Also heightening the film's ambience is an orchestra of 60 musicians, lending it both class and dignity and making the soundtrack a must-listen. Source: wikipedia The confusing and conspiratorial 15th ruler of Korea's Joseon Dynasty King Gwanghae (Lee Byung-hun) orders his councilor, Heo Gyun (Ryoo Seung-Ryong), to find him a double in order to avoid the constant threat of assassination. Heo Gyun finds Ha-sun, a beggar who looks remarkably like the king, and just as feared, Gwang-hae is poisoned. Heo Gyun proposes Ha-sun fill the role as the king until Gwang-hae recovers fully and grooms Ha-sun to look and act every bit the king. While assuming the role of the king at his first official appearance, Ha-sun begins to ponder the intricacies of the problems debated in his court. Being fundamentally more humanitarian than Gwang-hae, Ha-sun’s affection and appreciation of even the most minor servants slowly changes morale in the palace for the better. Over time he finds his voice and takes control of governing the country with real insight and fair judgments. Even Heo Gyun is moved by Ha-sun’s genuine concern for the people, and realizes he is an infinitely better ruler than Gwang-hae. However, his chief opposition, Park Chung-seo (Kim Myung-gon), notices the sudden shift in the king’s behavior and starts to ask questions. The queen (Han Hyo-joo) is also conflicted between the real king and the fake king’s secret.
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