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hushhh

SunTaek
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About hushhh

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  1. I agree with you 100% about Detective Park's behavior and feelings towards YeolWool. 1-He was never indifferent towards her. 2-Even as he shut her down he was never truly dismissive. He was always aware of her. 3-He never "accepted" her gifts (bribes really) but kept her presents. 4-He is a detective. YiRang's public suicide had tons of witnesses, none of whom saw the "RedLady" therefore it make sense for Detective Park not to indulge YeolWool's grief induce delusion so that she could recover from her grief of her sister's death. 5-It's clear he's a righteous and a man of honor. 6-If this was real life and a "detective" was trying to follow up on a woman's grief about her sister's suicide by locating a witness only she saw and had any romantic interest in the woman it would be obvious he was trying to get into her pants more than solve her sister's death. 7-I think Detective Park is a bit of an introvert and also a respectful observer. Although he care for YeolWool and watch her behave strangely she has never intruded in her grief. 8. He is a good, sweet, sane guy who only "romantic crime" was not believing in Yeolwool's delusion.
  2. Who is your she? Is "she" RedLady or is "she" the writer? I was writing about the writer/creative team, not a character. It is my belief that the purpose of dramas is to make the audience suffer. Even rom-coms need a touch of suffering to work. A good writer creates characters audience can and do love and then the writer torture the character and the audience by extension. I don't know any good dramas that don't cause a level of second hurt on behalf of characters. Even in comedies watching character you care about humiliating themselves is painful. I never quite understand when people want the complications to be resolved by week two. I never understood what they thought would happen after that. The more you feel for a character both joy and pain, the more successful the writer has been. My Mister was a gloomfest. Talk about torturing characters. However because of the magnitude of suffering every little ray of sunshine lifted the spirits high. While many in the forum lamented, Da-il's death didn't really matter much to me since the character remained and he didn't seem particularly bothered about being dead--expect that he was hungry and couldn't figure out how to eat. Or when he had problem communicating idea. Aside: that's the worse ghost life depiction ever. Da-Il runs around and gets tired and hungry. He has to run from place to place. What's the point in being a "ghost" if you are going to get tired as if you are alive. There is no guarantee that someone will die. They may all live to be in the sequel. Not that anyone said there would be a sequel, but . . .
  3. I think there will be a blood sacrifice as a way of sucker-punching the audience emotionally. I don't think I said it would be Kim Gyeol. If I did that was a typo. Sacrificial lambs in dramas have to be good or working for the greater good. If they are bad, their death looks like justice, not a sacrifice. They had to have been someone the the audience cares about to achieve some kind of emotional climax. I don't think Gyeol fits that profile, mostly because I don't connect with him. I've said a couple of times that I think Detective Park will be sacrificed to create an emotional climax. Sang Sub is another possible candidate for sacrifice. I love Chae-Won but she isn't sentimental and her dying won't create the emotional resonance that Park or Sang-Sub's death would. If they just want to kill random people they can kill Lawyer Baek. The writer can kill anyone she wants. But I don't think it will be Da-Il. If his condition changes in a direction that warrantees his death then the writer would have earned the right to kill Da-Il. But she has already "killed" him so why bother doing it again. If there is a significant death I suspect it the happen in the penultimate week and it will raise the stakes and increase the urgency for the Scoobies to stop RedLady. If it is Da-Il it could probably only happen in the last half hour of the series, if that early. While no human being is disposable, characters in dramas can be. I think Gyeol is somewhat disposal. As he is right now his death wouldn't cause a tectonic shift. Sang Sub death now would. Detective Park's death in a few more week will. While this drama has a relatively high body count, it is of "day players" not the core group. No one the audience knows well has died. Da-il's mother, YiRang, the nursery teacher and the principle the audience didn't know them well. Da-Il's mother and YiRang we feel we know, but we actually only know them through their connection to their son and daughter, respectively. The nurse we knew better but didn't like. I have no idea what with happen. My opinions are based on generalized narrative structure and how stories are usually put together. So who knows what will happen. I don't.
  4. 1st paragraph: Sorry, after several reading I am unable to follow the argument presented in the paragraph I italicized. 2nd paragraph: I mentioned Brooklyn to say that the ways doors are secured vary significantly based on geography. I didn't realize that there are places where the security chains are "decoration" and not used to secure the entrance. As someone who has lived in a city for most of my life, opening a door without engaging a chain after an attempted break-in, without first using a peephole (if one had one) seems rash and foolhardy and took me out of the verisimilitude of the scene. From the response of the some commenters my pointing out that this behavior seems like not the smartest way to act has somehow ????? done ????something???? (i'm not sure what) to their experience of the scene. Yeolwool's behavior looks poorly considered from the perspective of someone living in an metropolitan area in the United States. But as I said this drama was created with me in mind. I just hopped on the the ride. Seoul has a reputation of being one of the safest cities in the world so maybe that's how they do doors there. Thank you for offering permission for me to think as I think. I respect your right not to be bother by the unchained door. Since this is an open forum of one hopes that all experiences and perspectives are welcomed and that it is possible to share varying response to the drama without forum members feeling that their beloved drama is being attacked. I don't have time to waste on dramas I don't like. However liking a drama doesn't mean I leave my critical thinking ability behind. Actually that is the reason I watch drama--to think about different aspects of a the creative process not the fangirl over the product. I'm not here to change folks minds and I'm not here to be a part of a consensus that I don't agree with. I will continue to write about what I find interesting until I'm explored the subject to my satisfaction --or until a moderator decide to censor me. Despite what folks might think, I am not bashing the drama. I am watching and enjoying a different drama than the romantics seem to be doing--and I assume that is permitted. Thank you for trying to help me understand the other perspective on how locks work in other places in the world. I have acknowledged the validity of other perspectives on the use of chains on locks. With the new information her not using the chain makes sense intellectually, but it does not make sense to me viscerally. Didn't even realize that the forum would see what followed the opening of the door as being romantically significant as I was caught off guard by how reckless what came before seemed. I'm done. But I'll answer anyone who want to discuss door, lock, chains and geography more.
  5. I think you are right. The price Da-Il pays for being able to affect the human world is loss of some of his soul and moving closer to being evil. I don't know what a Fetch is technically, but I don't think Da-Il was a fetch before he tried to stab RedLady/ or perhaps want to pummel Gyeol. One of those acts seems to have activated the Fetch mechanism. It is very possible doors and lock work differently than they do in Brooklyn. In fact I'm sure they do. Few Korean drama have doors with old-fashioned lock and keys so . . . Since they drama is made for folks in Korea not in Brooklyn how the chain is use might well be different. Not knowing otherwise I can only respond to doors lock chains from what I've been exposed to. I know how chains on doors works from being an apartment dweller and overnighting at hotels. I know the chains aren't that strong, and anyone who busted the door open wouldn't be stopped by the chain. I mentioned that previously. As I mentioned previously it was her opening the door without engaging the chain after the attempted intrusion, knowing that the enemy distorts perspective that made little sense. Yeah, in real like fight/flight/freeze can happen to anyone at anytime. Usually the drama which aren't real but are simulacrum when things like that happen it is usually dealt with through a callback to say, we did that, but it's a plot point, and we will get back to in. In Terius Behind Me the female lead went into the forbidden room with a notepad. The camera hesitate on her putting the notepad down just inside the door so that the audience would pay attention. There was no similar attention to her taking the notepad out of the room when she left. I fully expect for that notepad being left behind to be a plot point. If it isn't it will seem like the continuity person left work early.
  6. That's a valid perspective. And as I mentioned putting on the chain at that time would only offer a modicum more protection. But I do believe she asked who is it. [I may be wrong on that.] So she wasn't trying to pretend she wasn't home. Also the thing that bothered me most was opening the door without the chain. Different experience, different perspective. That's what makes it all so interesting.
  7. Episode 9. Unless it's a plot point, the unused chain on YeolWool's door was just beyond stupid. [EDIT: Couple of commenters seem to find the preceding statement drama bashing. Not my intent. They have made the argument that it is legitimate that people don't use their chains. I can't dispute that is how people roll in other places in the universe. However looking at that chain hanging unused messed with my experience of the scene and destroyed the verisimilitude for me.] It [the unused chain] made the scene almost unbearable to watch. Not because it made the scene tense, but because it took me out of the scene wondering about YeolWool's stupidity. Someone is knocking at YeolWool's door that makes her nervous, she doesn't put the chain on. The extra protection the chain offers is minimal, but every bit counts. She know she is dealing with an entity that causes disruption in perception, YET she opens the door for who she thinks is Da-Il without putting the chain on or looking through a peephole. [I'm not sure she has a peephole, not that it matters because if she did she wouldn't use it. So disappointed in the production's attention to detail. [Will take it back if it proves to be a plot point.] I really love Detective Park. I find him the most human of the group. As much as I love him, I really get angry when people interfere with people violate people's privacy. Chae-Won asked him to not watched and yet he did. As annoyed as it makes me with him, I realize my annoyance is irrational because 1) He's a detective. It is in his job description that he will violate people's privacy. 2) He has to violate their privacy for reasons internal to the story because the Scooby team won't tell him anything. And he doesn't want them to tell him anything about the supernatural element of the case. If they did he'd be forced to accept things he doesn't want o believe in OR call them crazy and walk away. 3) He needs to know things that he cannot be told by the ScoobyDos so the plot can move forward. While Detective Park's recurring heartbreaks makes me wish for his happiness in some way, shape, or form [and because i care about him so much I am convinced they will kill him to create an emotional climax] Kim Gyeol angst, regret, and guilt is something I understand intellectually but rarely it touches me emotionally. Kim Gyeol is more a source of annoyance than he is contributing tension to the plot. Kim Gyeol's interaction with the REdLady gives the series a chance to see her cunning but he seems like such a mental lightweight that her ability to trick him doesn't even seem that brilliant. Kim Gyeol be good or be more interesting with being conflicted and deluded. Please. EDIT: I don't think the old woman, [whomever she might be, I'm not convinced like she's RedGirl mother without proof beyond YeolWool analysis] is trying to hurt Da-Il. I think she is doing what the nurse, who she has no reason not to trust, tells her is best for Da-Il. I've also heard her described as crazy. I don't see any reason to think she is crazy. So far we can surmise she drinks too much. 1- It is perfectly possible to marry and not want kids, not have kids, and live a wonderfully fulfilled happy life. 2- Sometimes you have to have kids to know you hate parenting. I didn't actually say all that. I'm not sure why she thinks/felt there was no love. I don't know that there was no love. This is a mystery. The people creating the story will chock it full of misdirection. Also, not all parents kill their children because they don't love them. There are some parents, especially in infanticide and suicide, whose disordered thinking cause them to kill their children because they love them and believe that the world that has treated the parent badly is too awful a place to treat their children well if the parent are not around, so they take their children with them when they plan their death. It's messed up, but people kill for many reasons. The Scooby team posit that REdLady's current behavior is about repeating the circumstance of her life before her "death". She is giving all her victims the exact same choice her father had and she herself had. One must die. You decide will it be you or someone you love. Redlady's father had the choice and he chose to live and let his children die. Redgirl had he choice and she decided to live and let her father and brother die. [I don't consider this murder. But she might] Da-Il's mom had that choice and she decided to die and let her son live. I'm not sure if YiRang had an option of killing YeolWool to live. [Wait. I guess YiRang did (maybe) since she was being tormented with the idea that she was a burden to YeolWool.] And I'm not sure if the nursery school teacher and the principal had that choice. Gyeol had the choice and he chose himself. I don't think it is a bad/wrong choice especially if he doesn't do the actual killing, but in this instance it is a bad choice because he made a deal with a deamon. Deamons can't be trusted. They don't keep their word. What the true deal is, is die and be done with me, or live and I'll kill someone in your name and you become my thrall forever. So RedLady's action that reflects on her death is -targeting children [that's how the series began] -binary choice: one must die, you or someone you love. -love induced guilt. victims are tormented that their very existence has caused a burden to the people who they love [Redgirl and brother were burdens to their parents--or so it seems] -suicide as a mean of freeing their loved one. [One wonders if REdgirl regrets not freeing her father by knowingly allowing herself to be murdered--which would be then a suicide.] -death by poison Here is the thing: - The majority of the audience have reacted to Redlady/girl as is she is a full grown adult psychopath. And that makes sense because we met her in an adult body behaving as a psychopath. - The attempted poisoning at the travelfair gave YeolWool a chance to establish the Redlady is not Redlady but Redgirl in her own mind. [She craves MaryJanes as footwear and when she isn't in MaryJanes she is in sneakers--both are choice footwear for very young girls] Her handwriting is the handwriting of a 12 year-old. Chances are that her thoughts and critical thinking reasoning ability is that of a 12 year-old. And her sense of "morality" is that of a 12 year-old who grew up in a hand-to-mouth existence. - We are viewing causing the death of her father as something she did without conscience, YET the nurse explained that her first kill was the person she loved most in the world. We know that it her Father. So we MIGHT be viewing this entire story incorrectly. -This might be the story of a girl who loved her father very much, even if he was a little shady. -She tested him one last time, never expecting him to fail. -When he failed her test of his love it destroyed her faith in humanity and her sense of self. -She is filled with regret and horror. -She feels as if she is a monster. -The only way she can be less of a monster is to establish that what she did was what any other HUMAN BEING WOULD DO, save themselves over the person they love most. -So Gyeol belongs to her because he made the same choice she did. -The other people by choosing to save their loved ones and kill themselves reinforce the idea that she is a monster and a awful daughter who didn't love enough to die for love. If that is the case, the only way to stop RedLady's destruction is to undo the guilt she feels over living after causing her father to die. BUT THEN AGAIN, MAYBE NOT.
  8. Episode 8. The acting on the series is lovely. But even among such marvelous work I have to call out Lee Jae-Kyoon for his quiet intensity and his ability to touch my heart with his simplicity. The moment when he figured out what he had seen was YeolWool comforting Da-Il and he had no chance to win her heart, broke MY heart. Well done Lee Jae-Kyoon. There was a comment about Da-Il wearing the same clothes all the time. I think like food, the rules of the other side requires that ghost be offered things, they can't just take what they want. So until someone offers Da-il new clothes and burn it so he can access it, he should be in that outfit. I wonder what big boss man has to do with Red Lady's death. RedLady has something essentially wrong. Her power only seems to work where there is love. People kill to protect their loved ones. I suspect that she thinks love was missing in her life which is why she is so angry. Random thoughts: It is my belief that the first acting class that male Korean actors are required to take is full out running and the second class is female co-star piggybacking.
  9. Fans have a long history of being judgemental and limited in their outlook and tolerance for change. I seriously hope Da-il is not back to "life" already. And if he is I hope it is because that they need to cater to a fanbase limited imagination and objection to anything that stretch the the image of their star. It's fanbase like this that kill artistry. It is way too early in the narrative for Da-il to be back to life unless it is well thought out. Fans. Eyeroll. What difference does it make if Da-il is alive or dead or half dead. If you are a Choi Daniel fan and is his doing good work in a drama why isn't that enough. Eyeroll eyeroll eyeroll.
  10. Well I don't know much about Korean ghosts, fetchs, or rules for supernatural beings but I assume her spirit (which was locked out of her body) is back in her body where it belongs. Something is in thate body activating it. Red Lady now seems amoral as a new born who only knows what it wants and needs and does what is feels necessary to fulfill that needs. I think the preview said that Red Lady has lost her ability to control people minds and push them to suicide so she must now kill using her corporeal state--if she continues as she has been she will now be a serial killer. Yet, I'm not sure if she has lost her her any or all of her ability of manipulate. Blood flowing into people's eyes seems to be the sign that Red Lady's will is at work in the person. We saw the male witness to the hospital murders change his description of the perpetrator to throw people off her trail. We saw him do with with blood visible in his eyes. It could be that 1) she can still manipulate people/affect their thinking to a certain level but cannot push them to suicide OR 2) the Scooby Team may just be flat out wrong about Red Lady's new abilities. I don't think their expert ChaeWon knows much about re-incorporated fetchs. Western Fetch https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fetch_(folklore)
  11. She was never technically a ghost, i suppose, because she never lost her body. She was always a human being in a "coma" whose spirit wandered at night, with a curfew. So it seems Da-il's attempt to kill her woke her from her coma--which isn't the usual approach to dealing with patients in comas so I wouldn't recommend it. Neither the Red Lady's or the nurse's body was found amoungst the carnage, so I think she still has her own body. Since I'm not watching the carnage or the scary parts I might well be missing some of the story.
  12. So glad I waited until this afternoon to watch episode 7. Had I begun watching it at evening time I wouldn't have made it pass 15 minutes. Okay, so establish that Da-il can write why are we doing extensive product placement with the phone and stylus? I really like Detective Park. I hope he gets the girl. I suspect he'll be the drama's blood sacrifice. To go for the audience's vicera they'll have kill a viewers' favorite. And when that person go their spirit won't stay around in ghost form. Attorney Baek won't serve that function. Not warm fuzzy or needy enough. Sang-Sub would be another good option as a sacrifice. They may need to keep the sweet old character around. They better NOT TOUCH Chae-Won or else . . . Plus they would need her if they do a second season. Da-il's already dead. They'll need him to the very end, then he can be sacrificed. Killing YeoWool would be pointless because everyone in the story is already committed to her. Not much more emotional mileage from that death. So I think it will be Detective Park, who is already set up as a sweet "tragic in love" figure, for the blood sacrifice. I'm thinking that Da-Il and Red Lady has history that led to the targeting of his mother.
  13. Read both your blog post, the post you linked and the post within the post. As per usual very interesting and insightful. YOur power of observation and analysis are tremendous. I'm not watching as carefully as you [I'm ascared], but even if I were I wouldn't notice all that you do. The link between the victims remain a mystery--unless you have solved that already. We seem to have a vengeance ghost. A child who was not loved uses her power to turn love into guilt and self loathing. Is she a psychopath because she wasn't loved or was she not loved because she was/is a psychopath? Is the timing of YiRang's boyfriend's death significant. Why the birthday? How old is YeolWool anyway? Maybe it's time to harvest the vessel. If nurseman was always keeping an eye on YeolWool as a possible replacement vessel for Red Lady's spirit it would explain why he knows so much about her. Perhaps Yeolwool's dying wouldn't leave them with a viable vessel for use. Maybe they need her to give up the will to live by destroying all she loves and holds dare. Her sister. So far there is no support for this extrapolation so i'll just stop.
  14. I've got to say that one of the great mystery for me is why this series is sponsored by Science & ICT, especially since I have no idea what ICT is.
  15. LOL Well no surprises. Things can only look up, or down. But you have your warning. I don't think I said that. At this rate I'm not sure what a happy ending would look like. I'm not sure what a sad ending would look like--except if Lady Red wins all.
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