rubie

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  1. Photo: BH Entertainment @bhent_official Today is JinGoo's Day
  2. Lovely Minjung in black t-shirt Byunghun worn black t-shirt on his birthday and Hunnie Couple night out with friends
  3. July 18, 2017 BiFan 2017 Review: ROOM NO. 7 Gets A 6 At Best Lee Yong-seung directed the pressure cooker comedy with a hint of genre flair; Shin Ha-kyun and Doh Kyung-soo star. by Pierce Conran ScreenAnarchy (related SHK mention only) Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and Save the Green Planet star Shin delivers a manic turn as the shop owner, punctuated with tense bursts of energy. The aggressiveness of the performance masks the shallow characterization but Shin, as always, is a welcome presence on screen.
  4. July 20, 2017 [Herald Review] Experiencing Japanese atrocities in ‘Battleship Island’ Star-studded cast battles to escape slave labor island in large-scale film It is inevitable that Korean cinema frequently retell the story of the Japanese occupation, a defining scar in the country’s history, in various ways. “The Battleship Island” is the most recent of such films, recreating Japanese atrocities on a massive visual scale. The film’s message is heavy and clear: it exposes the horrific torture of Koreans on Hashima Island from 1940 to 1945. Records show that around 500 to 800 Koreans were taken captive on the island and forced into slave labor, digging 1,000-meter deep coal mines. Many were children -- their small bodies more easily fit into the dark, narrow tunnels. There is plenty of detailed description in the film. A huge set was built in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, recreating the island as accurately as possible. It’s jarring to see how sleekly the atrocities have been recreated. Dozens of dirt-covered, emaciated laborers chip away at the mines, with seawater and gas bursting through the walls every now and then. People die with alarming ease when rocks fall from the ceiling, or a cart wheels the wrong way. The film was shot with IMAX screening in mind -- it will open in surround-screen 4DX in CGV Yongsan -- by cinematographer Lee Mo-gae as something to experience rather than merely watch. That leaves little room for storytelling, unfortunately, and the plot is hurried to fit in all the necessary elements. Yet it is bound to satisfy many as a decent commercial film, with solid performances by a star-studded cast and large-scale visuals. (CJ Entertainment) In the film, Hashima Island, dubbed “Battleship Island” because of its shape, is a hodgepodge of Koreans who have either been forced onto the island or lured there under false pretenses. Hwang Jung-min plays Kang-ok, the leader of a musical band who has a genial way with people. His daughter is the feisty So-hee, played by Kim Soo-ahn, and the singer of his band. Though the father-daughter storyline is formulaic, it is a delight to watch these two talents perform as the heart of the film, singing, dancing and bickering affectionately amid harsh circumstances. The two set off on a boat to Japan after hearing of money-making opportunities there, only to end up on the island. Others on the island include Chil-sung, played by So Ji-sub, a former gang member who was once the most feared man in the Jongno streets. Lee Jung-hyun plays Mal-nyeon, a woman who was sold to the Chinese, then to the Japanese by Korean pimps. Song Joong-ki, who rose to pan-Asian fame for his portrayal of an Army captain in last year‘s hit military drama “Descendants of the Sun,” returns as Moo-young, an elite soldier of the Korean Liberation Army and an agent with the US’ Office of Strategic Services, who infiltrates the island to rescue a key Korean independence movement figure. A photo of the island compelled director Ryoo Seung-wan to make the film. “I was stimulated by what kind of stories would have taken place in that hellish place,” he said after a press screening in Seoul Wednesday. “The sense of obligation in exposing the history there came afterward, while I was making the film. “But there were evil Koreans on the island as well as evil Japanese,” he added. “In the end, it comes down to the individual... I wanted to focus on how the strong become weak and how the weak can become strong in the course of war.” “The Battleship Island” hits local theaters on July 26. By Rumy Doo (doo@heraldcorp.com)
  5. Source: Pierce Conran‏ @pierceconran
  6. July 20, 2017 Lee Min Jung at 'Battleship Island' VIP Premiere Source: STARNEWS ++
  7. Source: Pierce Conran‏ @pierceconran THE BATTLESHIP ISLAND, introed by Ryoo Seung-wan, Hwang Jung-min, So Ji-sub, Song Joong-ki & al. #군함도 #송중기 #소지섭 #황정민
  8. Source: Pierce Conran‏ @pierceconran THE BATTLESHIP ISLAND, introed by Ryoo Seung-wan, Hwang Jung-min, So Ji-sub, Song Joong-ki & al. #군함도 #송중기 #소지섭 #황정민
  9. July 20, 2017 Lee Byung-hun x Kim Yoon-seok x Park Hae-il 'Namhansanseong Fortress' to be released in September Source: STARNEWS According to CJ E&M on the 20th, the film 'Namhansanseong Fortress', starring Lee Byung-hun and Kim Yoon-seok, will meet the audience in September. Post-production is currently ongoing in full swing mode. Namhansanseong Fortress aka South Castle, which started shooting on November 21 last year, finished its 5-month filming schedule in Pyeongchang, Gangwon Province on April 23.
  10. July 20, 2017 Lee Byung-hun x Kim Yoon-seok x Park Hae-il 'Namhansanseong Fortress' to be released in September Source: STARNEWS (ELBH Google-gist) According to CJ E&M on the 20th, the film 'Namhansanseong Fortress', starring Lee Byung-hun and Kim Yoon-seok, will meet the audience in September. Post-production is currently ongoing in full swing mode. Namhansanseong Fortress aka South Castle, which started shooting on November 21 last year, finished its 5-month filming schedule in Pyeongchang, Gangwon Province on April 23.
  11. July 20, 2017 [Herald Review] Experiencing Japanese atrocities in ‘Battleship Island’ Star-studded cast battles to escape slave labor island in large-scale film It is inevitable that Korean cinema frequently retell the story of the Japanese occupation, a defining scar in the country’s history, in various ways. “The Battleship Island” is the most recent of such films, recreating Japanese atrocities on a massive visual scale. The film’s message is heavy and clear: it exposes the horrific torture of Koreans on Hashima Island from 1940 to 1945. Records show that around 500 to 800 Koreans were taken captive on the island and forced into slave labor, digging 1,000-meter deep coal mines. Many were children -- their small bodies more easily fit into the dark, narrow tunnels. There is plenty of detailed description in the film. A huge set was built in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, recreating the island as accurately as possible. It’s jarring to see how sleekly the atrocities have been recreated. Dozens of dirt-covered, emaciated laborers chip away at the mines, with seawater and gas bursting through the walls every now and then. People die with alarming ease when rocks fall from the ceiling, or a cart wheels the wrong way. The film was shot with IMAX screening in mind -- it will open in surround-screen 4DX in CGV Yongsan -- by cinematographer Lee Mo-gae as something to experience rather than merely watch. That leaves little room for storytelling, unfortunately, and the plot is hurried to fit in all the necessary elements. Yet it is bound to satisfy many as a decent commercial film, with solid performances by a star-studded cast and large-scale visuals. (CJ Entertainment) (CJ Entertainment) In the film, Hashima Island, dubbed “Battleship Island” because of its shape, is a hodgepodge of Koreans who have either been forced onto the island or lured there under false pretenses. Hwang Jung-min plays Kang-ok, the leader of a musical band who has a genial way with people. His daughter is the feisty So-hee, played by Kim Soo-ahn, and the singer of his band. Though the father-daughter storyline is formulaic, it is a delight to watch these two talents perform as the heart of the film, singing, dancing and bickering affectionately amid harsh circumstances. The two set off on a boat to Japan after hearing of money-making opportunities there, only to end up on the island. Others on the island include Chil-sung, played by So Ji-sub, a former gang member who was once the most feared man in the Jongno streets. Lee Jung-hyun plays Mal-nyeon, a woman who was sold to the Chinese, then to the Japanese by Korean pimps. Song Joong-ki, who rose to pan-Asian fame for his portrayal of an Army captain in last year‘s hit military drama “Descendants of the Sun,” returns as Moo-young, an elite soldier of the Korean Liberation Army and an agent with the US’ Office of Strategic Services, who infiltrates the island to rescue a key Korean independence movement figure. (CJ Entertainment) (CJ Entertainment) A photo of the island compelled director Ryoo Seung-wan to make the film. “I was stimulated by what kind of stories would have taken place in that hellish place,” he said after a press screening in Seoul Wednesday. “The sense of obligation in exposing the history there came afterward, while I was making the film. “But there were evil Koreans on the island as well as evil Japanese,” he added. “In the end, it comes down to the individual... I wanted to focus on how the strong become weak and how the weak can become strong in the course of war.” “The Battleship Island” hits local theaters on July 26. By Rumy Doo (doo@heraldcorp.com)
  12. July 2, 2017 A Single Rider (2017) New York Asian Film Festival 2017 Posted by Steve Kopian at Unseen Films Lee Byung-hun is quite good as a stockbroker whose life goes upside down when an investment his firm had been pushing is revealed to be a scam ruining thousands. Packing up his stuff he heads to Australia where is wife and son have been living so the boy can get a better education.Filled with shame and regret he can't bring himself to let them know he is there. Making the acquaintance of a young girl he tries to sort out where he belongs. Interesting meditation on regret is well acted moody drama. The performances are the best part of the film which frequently undercuts itself by insists it is deep and meaningful. The trick with this film is going to be the final fifteen minutes where the film takes a turn, which will either thrill you or act as a game killer. Its not unexpected as such but at the same time it may change how you see the film- it changed mine (I screamed at the screen) July 19, 2017 NYAFF 2017: Lee Byung-hun Regrets a Life Misspent in Korean Drama SINGLE RIDER by Austin Vashaw Cinapse.co Korean superstar Lee Byung-hun leads melancholy drama Single Rider (aka A Single Rider), which just screened at the New York Asian Film Festival. A career-driven financial manager’s world is turned upside-down when his company goes under, the result of a culture of dishonest sales tactics in which he shares culpability. The sudden loss of both his employment and reputation is a staggering blow, and puts into sharp focus his misplaced priorities of work over family. His relationship with his wife and child is a long-distance one — they live in Australia, an arrangement which has been convenient for him but erosive to their connection. With nothing to hold him back to his life, he makes the trip to Australia unannounced to salvage the one thing he has left — but as he is about to meet his wife who is unaware of his arrival, he sees that she is close friends with her male neighbor. Too close for comfort. Rather than announce his presence, he slinks to the shadows to see more. Increasingly withdrawn, he keeps to himself and shuns human engagement, speaking only another Korean woman that has tried to befriend him upon learning that he is a fellow countryman. He is a stranger and voyeur of his own wife and child, slowly coming to grips with the realization that they may be better off without him. The film is a rather slow burn, and a mopey, repetitive piano and strings score doesn’t help matters in the least. But the narrative eventually works its way to a very emotionally engaging place when all the dominoes being set up start to fall. It would be very easy to slip into spoiler territory on this one, but suffice it to say that later revelations provide earlier scenes with new context, and viewers who pay attention are rewarded by a chilling portrait of a life of wrong choices.
  13. July 2, 2017 A Single Rider (2017) New York Asian Film Festival 2017 Posted by Steve Kopian at Unseen Films Lee Byung-hun is quite good as a stockbroker whose life goes upside down when an investment his firm had been pushing is revealed to be a scam ruining thousands. Packing up his stuff he heads to Australia where is wife and son have been living so the boy can get a better education.Filled with shame and regret he can't bring himself to let them know he is there. Making the acquaintance of a young girl he tries to sort out where he belongs. Interesting meditation on regret is well acted moody drama. The performances are the best part of the film which frequently undercuts itself by insists it is deep and meaningful. The trick with this film is going to be the final fifteen minutes where the film takes a turn, which will either thrill you or act as a game killer. Its not unexpected as such but at the same time it may change how you see the film- it changed mine (I screamed at the screen) July 19, 2017 NYAFF 2017: Lee Byung-hun Regrets a Life Misspent in Korean Drama SINGLE RIDER by Austin Vashaw Cinapse.co Korean superstar Lee Byung-hun leads melancholy drama Single Rider (aka A Single Rider), which just screened at the New York Asian Film Festival. A career-driven financial manager’s world is turned upside-down when his company goes under, the result of a culture of dishonest sales tactics in which he shares culpability. The sudden loss of both his employment and reputation is a staggering blow, and puts into sharp focus his misplaced priorities of work over family. His relationship with his wife and child is a long-distance one — they live in Australia, an arrangement which has been convenient for him but erosive to their connection. With nothing to hold him back to his life, he makes the trip to Australia unannounced to salvage the one thing he has left — but as he is about to meet his wife who is unaware of his arrival, he sees that she is close friends with her male neighbor. Too close for comfort. Rather than announce his presence, he slinks to the shadows to see more. Increasingly withdrawn, he keeps to himself and shuns human engagement, speaking only another Korean woman that has tried to befriend him upon learning that he is a fellow countryman. He is a stranger and voyeur of his own wife and child, slowly coming to grips with the realization that they may be better off without him. The film is a rather slow burn, and a mopey, repetitive piano and strings score doesn’t help matters in the least. But the narrative eventually works its way to a very emotionally engaging place when all the dominoes being set up start to fall. It would be very easy to slip into spoiler territory on this one, but suffice it to say that later revelations provide earlier scenes with new context, and viewers who pay attention are rewarded by a chilling portrait of a life of wrong choices.
  14. July 19, 2017 Lee Kwang-soo Donated Hundred Thousand Dollars to the Children's Hospital Source: Naver via HanCinema.net Actor Lee Kwang-soo's secretive good deed was revealed and many people are praising the actor's good heart. According to the OSEN News, Lee Kwang-soo have been donating a large amount of money for patients with financial difficulties. In 2015 and 2016, he donated 50 thousand dollars each, total nearly 100 thousand dollars to Seoul Asan Medical Center. Lee Kwang-soo's donation is being used for the hospital's children patients who are under 19 years old and have been struggling with their medical bills. The actor have always been the first in line to help out the needy, as he volunteers in many campaigns and volunteer work with Unicef. As his good deed in secrecy comes to the light, we hope to learn from his example. By. Lily Lee
  15. July 19, 2017 WIND WIND WIND Starring SHIN Ha-kyun and LEE Sung-min Cranks Up TWENTY Director LEE Byoung-heon’s Upcoming Comedy by SONG Soon-jin / KoBiz Directed by LEE Byoung-heon, who previously made Twenty (2015), youth comedy Wind Wind Wind (translated title) has completed filming. The film is about two families finding true love through deviance on Jeju Island. The film was produced by Hive Media Co-op which produced HUR Jin-ho’s The Last Princess (2016). It will be distributed by Next Entertainment World which is known for distributing hit movies including TRAIN TO BUSAN (2016) and Okja. “It is a comedy about two couples encountering crises stronger than typhoons on Jeju Island, which is known for its strong winds.” the promoter said. In addition, there are great expectations for its star studded cast. Korean wave star SONG Ji-hyo and SHIN Ha-kyun of Save the Green Planet (2003) and The Villainess play Mi-young and Bong-soo respectively. In the movie, these two are a realistic couple that have been married for seven years by obligation rather than love. Actor LEE Sung-min will feature as Seok-geun, the Casanova and Mi-young’s older brother. LEE El, a rising star through WOO Min-ho’s Inside Men (2015) and TV drama Goblin (2016), will play Jenny, a character with an irresistible charm that disturbs all relationships. Wind Wind Wind is gearing up for release soon after its four-month filming on July 1st, 2017.