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OfficiallyK

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About OfficiallyK

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  1. TODAY I SEEK TO COVERT MY FELLOW BEAUTY-ENTHUSIASTS TO CHEMICAL-EXFOLIANT-LOVING...FELLOWS. Please keep reading it gets better, I promise. [The picture above is of a few of my skincare products I swear by. However, the only two chemical exfoliants--my favorites--are Drunk Elephant TLC Serum (pink colored) and Sunday Riley Good Genes (white packaging with gold accent)] The picture is from my instagram. Chemical Exfoliants. I believe they are one of the most over-looked items in the Asian skincare industry. I don't know why, considering they do so. well. SO. WELL. (LONG RANT/BACKGROUND INFO) Now I grew up with my Asian mom and Asian dad and their 'Asian' mentality that we are born with Asian skin and therefore we must use Asian products because they are meant to be compatible with our skin. I have long realized that is not the case. In fact, many Asian (whether it be Japanese or Korean) skincare lines have essences and while I very much like the idea of essences, my skin is not compatible with many of the ingredients inside it. One of the ingredients I know my skin cannot tolerate is hydrogenated castor oil. I will break out in patches of acne if it is in my skincare. (Non-Asian skincare products have this ingredient as well). But my point is, my parents were wrong. And the moment I discovered that, I branched out into American skincare products and I did a hell of a lot of my own research as well. I do not recommend just taking other people's words for it (or relying only on reviews) because everyone's skin is different AND, most importantly, everyone has a different skincare routine. Someone can say that a product did not do what it claimed to do and someone else can say that it did EVERYTHING it was suppose to do, but the difference is that one of them probably has an entire skincare routine (toner, essence, lotion, serum, moisturizer) and the other probably is only using that one product. Whatever the case may be, the variables are different for each person. My point is, you really don't know until you try it. Now continuing on with chemical exfoliants... They are a god-send. I want to say I am exaggerating, but I sh!t you not, I am not exaggerating. Quick break down of what they are: Chemical exfoliants refer to Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHA)--which are ingredients like glycolic, lactic, magic and tartaric acids---or to Beta Hydroxy Acids (BHA)--which is only the ingredient salicylic acid. Now both are acids, but the difference between the two is that AHA's exfoliate just the top outermost layer of the skin and BHA goes down deep into the pore and exfoliates the deeper layers. I recommend both. AHA's will get rid of acne scars, dry patches, sunburn patches, dead skin that is just laying around (dead skin laying around can actually lead to clogged pores and pimples). BHA's, on the other hand will help do what AHA's do, but they also go deep into the pore and help to clear it out; this means less blackheads, or smaller blackheads, and deep acne scars should begin to fade. Both help smooth out wrinkles and fine lines (though if the wrinkles are deep, I would suggest laser therapy because AHA and BHA cannot work THAT hard). Chemical exfoliants do SO much. They truly do SO much. And it has been bothering me that I stalk the soompi beauty and fashion forum section (for ages now) and there has never been a thread written on it. I promise you, I am not writing to show off how much I know. I decided to make this thread because I've suffered from acne and I purchased the Sunday Riley Good Genes serum and, I sh!t you not, I used it that night and the NEXT DAY my skin looked so much better. It was radiant, and smooth, and dark spots were lighter, and my little patch of pimple-like bumps on my forehead were reduced so much I had to use my 10x mirror to get a closer look (after the second night of usage, the little bumps were gone). It was amazing. It was so amazing, I recommended it to all my sisters and my friends and my husband. So I figured I should share it with my soompi family. I am 22 years old. Asian. I have combination, dry, dehydrated, acne-prone, sensitive skin. Like I have VERY sensitive skin. My skin cannot tolerate the clarisonic no matter which brush head I use. I even bought the Foreo Luna 2 silicone cleansing device from sephora and, though it didn't break me out, it didn't do anything for my skin either. Instead of using cleansing tools, I use a wet microfiber face cloth every morning and night and to exfoliate, I use my AHA's and BHA's. (DO NOT USE TWO CHEMICAL EXFOLIATING PRODUCTS AT ONCE). It will burn, you will peel. I have tried it. Please do not. I also use it every night, but when I first started out my skin could not handle it every night. So I worked my way up from twice a week until my skin tolerated it enough for nightly usage. Again, I'm not trying to sell anyone anything. I'm not a dermatologist, either. I'm really only looking to inform of these miracle workers that worked for me that I cannot live without. You don't have to take my word for it; you are free to do your own research and try it yourself. Do remember that everyone's skin is different and they may react differently. - - - - - Please recommend me some more chemical exfoliants, if you know of any good ones. I love to try them. GOTTA CATCH EM ALLLLL. I've tried: Drunk Elephant TLC Glycolic Serum -- (My rating) 10/10 Sunday Riley Good Genes -- 09/10 Pixi Glow tonic -- 07/10 (not as strong as the top two. Makes a good morning toner though) First Aid Beauty Facial Radiance Pads -- 07/10 (same as pix glow tonic) Paula's choice BHA 2% -- 10/10
  2. its random, but hey, who was it?who is the last person you hugged? and why? Mine, is my little cousin. hugged him because i was leaving for school this morning and he looked so sad that i was leaving. I told him i'd be back soon, but seven hours doesn't seem so...soon. . . . poor kid.
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