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do Koreans have a lot in common w/ Japanese?

18 posts in this topic

Posted

like how Vietnamese & Chinese
seems like Koreans look and talk similiar to Japanese and have similiar customs like bowing all the time

and the Vietnamese have more in common with the Chinese

I noticed lots of Japanese restaurants are owned by Koreans

and lots of Vietnamese restaurants owned by Chinese and offer Chinese & Viet cuisine

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Posted

\

In on this thread!

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Posted

Don't Chinese bow also?

You could make the connection between China and Japan also. Northern Chinese look like many Japanese, Japan includes kanji sharing many Chinese characters (I think Korea does have Chinese characters but not as many as Japanese), never give anyone with sets of four (same with Korea)

Anyway I would think that all three countries share culture equally since they've mixed and mingled with each other.

Also about Koreans owning Japanese restaurants, I think it's more of a business aspect of things (or they were zainichi). Japan is more known than Korea outside of the Asian realm. Lol I know a Chinese family I think who owns a Japanese restaurant and their cousins owns a Chinese buffet. :/

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Posted

Ya, k-pop is just like japanese pop scene.

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Posted

Koreans/Japanese/Chinese will say no.

But in reality, East Asian cultures are all derived off of each other.

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Posted

i don't see how they wouldn't

korea got colonized by japan during ww2

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Posted

They're the same in the context that Korea's pop-culture is completely derived from Japan.

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Posted

Eh when it comes to language Korean and Japanese don't sound similar at all. Pop culture, yeah, definitely, so many feminine boys strutting cutesy poses because it's haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaawt.~

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Posted

No I don't think so. There is only a concept of East Asian or Southeast Asian. The people at this site are talking about it specifically.

http://www.eastbound88.com/showthread.php/2889-East-Asia-NE-Asia-and-SE-Asia

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Posted

For an outsider without much knowledge of Asia it would appear they are very similar. But with experience people can start to see the differences. The languages have some similar grammar they are actually quite different. Once you get past the customs like bowing and such you can see that the Korean personality and mentality is very different to Japanese personality and mentality. Koreans are much more expressive and take pride in their emotions where as the Japanese are much more reserved. This is a generalization of course but backed up by many books on Korean culture. Not to mention the tension between Korean and Japanese due to their history. There are some major differences.

The reason why there are so many Koreans running Japanese restaurants is because Japanese food is more popular in western (and other) countries. So when a Korean is looking to start a business they realise that a Japanese restaurant is more profitable. Korean food is becoming more popular around the world but people are still more used to Japanese food. You don't need to be Japanese to make Japanese food.

So while there are a lot of superficial things that are similar, underneath the surface I see Koreans and Japanese are being quite different. I'm quite aware of differences as I'm married to a Korean while my brother lives in Japan and speaks fluent Japanese. Sometimes the differences are deep but sometimes they are superficial but they'll come up. For example he will insist on drinking soup with Japanese way but I'll do it the Korean way. Minor things but they come up all the time.

I do think people who don't live in Asia really just lump all Asians together (a friend of mine actually thought Japan was the capital of China) and because of this they only see the similarities at first. Though, with Korean culture becoming more popular, the rest of the world is slowly seeing how Korea is different from the rest of Asia. I live in Australia and get asked a lot about my relationship and about Korea. I recently started a blog about Korean culture and just some humorous stuff about being married to a Korean guy. http://www.mykoreanhusband.com/

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Posted

There are a lot of ethnic Chinese found throughout the world, especially Southeast Asia and that's another big reason why you might see Chinese owned Vietnamese restaurants. One of the biggest Vietnamese business districts in the United States - Little Saigon in Westminster, CA has a lot of Chinese/Vietnamese businesses for that very reason. Not to mention China ruled Vietnam for many years. 

This used to be the Chinese characters that Vietnamese wrote with.

chu-thich-nom.gif

Koreans/Japanese/Chinese will say no.

But in reality, East Asian cultures are all derived off of each other.

Chinese will always claim to be the origin and Koreans and Japanese will deny it. Not surprising since "Taiwanese" people can't even handle being called Chinese, can't expect other Asians to do the same. 

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Posted

Koreans, Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese are all different , yet also have many similarities.  This could be said for all human cultures. 

Think of it like this. A little history of my weird ancestory. 

I'm Italian, HOWEVER, I do not look like the "typical" european look, I actually look alot like chinese or vietnamese, basically asian. You may ask, well maybe your parents are asian. Well they are not. They look asian, but they are italian, my grandparents speak italian and were born and died in italy. My parents immigrated from Italy way back, and now I'm here. 

So whenever I'm asked, where are you from : I always say I'm Canadian, but then people always ask : What's your ancestory ? I always say italian. that's when people get confused . And sometimes I get confused too...

But that's besides the point , I think was rambling .

ANyways, European culture could be said to be the same. French, Italian, English, Irish, Hungarian, but they are also very different. Similar to China, Vietnam, and Korea. Also, even within these countries there are different dialects, and languages too. Similar to how french has different kinds of french now, thanks to Quebec, and then there's french from france. 

Similar to USA vietnamese language versus vietnamese from vietnam. Language and culture's change and merge. 

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Posted

Koreans, Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese are all different , yet also have many similarities.  This could be said for all human cultures. 

Think of it like this. A little history of my weird ancestory. 

I'm Italian, HOWEVER, I do not look like the "typical" european look, I actually look alot like chinese or vietnamese, basically asian. You may ask, well maybe your parents are asian. Well they are not. They look asian, but they are italian, my grandparents speak italian and were born and died in italy. My parents immigrated from Italy way back, and now I'm here. 

if your parents are not even asian how is it possible for your parents and yourself to look asian? Chinese or Vietnamese ??

maybe your family has Chinese that immigrated to Italy a long time ago? got any pics? Ive never seen an Italian that looks Chinese before?

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Posted

japanese, korean, they both came from china anyway

their cultures too, were borrowed. i learned about it in global 2 years ago

so there are definitely going to be some similarities

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Posted

It is not really correct to just say Koreans "came from China". Originally Koreans are not ethnically related to the Chinese. And the Korean language is now considered to be related to the Ural-Altaic language family- which means Koreans are related ethnically to the nomaidc people of central Asia. The Korean language is not related to Chinese languages (even though there is borrowing of words) but it is related to Japanese, Mongol and Manchu languages and even distantly related to Turkish, Hungarian and Finnish.

Korea has borrowed and mixed with China a lot- but it's not an offshoot of Chinese culture. It was considered to have just "come from China" for a long time but new research has found a lot of evidence that that is not true.

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Posted

Interesting... almost every Japanese restaurant I've ever been to was opened by a Chinese person.  Chinese food is usually offered at Viet restaurants, but rarely have I seen a Chinese restaurant offer Viet food.  And I don't notice much of the similarities the Vietnamese have with the Chinese.  There are a lot of Viet-Chinese people, but that's mostly because many Chinese people fled to Vietnam during the war.  The four cultures appear similar because they're from the same region of Asia, but they can be pretty distinctive.

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Posted

I lived in Japan as a child and am now living in Korea... I'm neither Korean nor Japanese, these are my observations based on travel, experiences and my friends, family and acquaintances.

The similarities are actually pretty few...

First off, Koreans and Japanese actually look VERY different in general. Enough so that you can often notice Asian foreigners among Korean locals here.

Their languages are as different as night and day, both in written and spoken form. The only way to confuse the two is if you'd never heard or seen either of them and had no basis for comparison.

Customs wise, there are a few similarities but these are also shared with a few other Asian cultures. Such as bowing, Confuciast social heirarchy, not sticking your chopsticks in the rice bowl, sitting on the floor at meal times (though regular tables are common too now), sleeping on the floor (though beds are common too now), using chopsticks (though Koreans also customarily use spoons as well and chopsticks are usually sold in sets with matching spoons. And their chopsticks are very different than Japanese chopsticks and they seem to hold them differently as well***).

But their food, aside from white rice, is very different. Korean and Japanese food have very different flavor margins... Korean foods tend toward spicy and flavorful, Japanese food often centers on simple, uncomplicated flavors.

Their ideals on what is and is not socially acceptable is different too. Some of the things that are socially ok in Korea, would be unacceptable or rude in Japan and vice versa. Japan is more conservative with their insults in my experience. For example, its less likely for a Japanese stranger you've never met to walk up and insult your clothing or figure... I've seen this happen a few time here in Korea and no one bats an eye (aside from the one insulted). On the other hand, many Korean strangers seem a lot less introverted than in Japan (exception being Japanese school girls I think) and are more likely to approach and try to start a conversation. Koreans are much more open, expressive and emotional/passionate in their social interactions than the Japanese. So while walking down the road its not uncommon to hear Korean individuals practically yelling at each other or into their phone and it can sound like they'er fighting with random bouts of laughter and excitement thrown in. This has made it very hard for me to measure the social atmosphere sometimes. Japanese are more likely to maintain quiet tones, even if angry in public, and are sparing on their public displays of emotion.

*** About the chopsticks differences... Korean chopsticks are long, slightly flattened and made of metal. Its taking me a lot of practice to use them efficiently even though I've used chopsticks since I was a child. It also seems they hold them differently because my Husband and his family have pointed out that I hold my chopsticks "wrong". I learned to use chopsticks as a small child in Japan and many of my Japanese friends over the years hold them the same way... Where as I've noticed most Koreans hold theirs the way my Husband does. So while both cultures use chopsticks, they both have their own type of chopsticks and style of holding and using them.

And when you start talking about the economic and working habits of Asian Immigrants in foreign countries. All bets are off, they're simply trying to adapt or find a successful way to support themselves. Many Asians who decide to open a restaurant opt to open Japanese or Chinese restaurants regardless of their own ethnic background simply because those are types of cuisine that already have an established popularity over much of the world and are most likely to succeed without going under (most restaurants fail in their first few years). In many parts of the USA, for example, Korean, Viet, Thai and Filipino and other foreign cuisine restaurants are very uncommon and most Americans aren't very adventurous with food and it would take a LONG time for the new cuisine to become established outside of big cities (which in the cities, they also have more competition).

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Posted

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=3omn6MoIjms

^ Japanese netizens getting their panties in a bunch because a Korean singer ate ramen out of the pot.

Perfect example of a seemingly innocent, yet explosive difference.

Youtube comment:

It's something that Koreans occasionally do when they eat alone. We know that it's not a very "classy" thing to do, but eating ramen from the lid is kind of like splitting an Oreo cookie to eat the frosting. It's like a nostalgic thing to do. Does this make sense? Please respect other cultures. In Korea, lifting the rice bowl is rude. In America, slurping noodles is rude, etc.

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