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Celestone G?

phantompc4phantompc4 Atl,GAPosts: 785Member
what is this stuff?
So every time i have a scar or rash or pimple something that deals with the skin all the adults in my family always say use celestone g. I donno about everyone else but i dont trust korean medicine especially since they say just about everything is good for you when most of that stuff isnt approved by anyone like medicine is in america (the fda). really i just want to know what this stuff really is and what its for.
"I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me" Philippians 4:13

Replies

  • DeafzDeafz ILJ CanadaPosts: 1,324Member
    QUOTE
    What is Celestone (betamethasone)?

    Betamethasone is in a class of drugs called steroids. Betamethasone prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

    Betamethasone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, and breathing disorders.

    Betamethasone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

    What is the most important information I should know about Celestone (betamethasone)?

    Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

    Your steroid medication needs may change if you have any unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you during treatment.

    There are many other medicines that can interact with steroids. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.
    You may have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms when you stop using betamethasone after using it over a long period of time. Do not stop using this medication suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you are taking a steroid, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking steroid medication.

    What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Celestone (betamethasone)?
    Do not use this medication if you are allergic to betamethasone.

    Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

    Before taking betamethasone, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

    *

    liver disease (such as cirrhosis);
    *

    kidney disease;
    *

    a thyroid disorder;
    *

    diabetes;
    *

    a history of malaria;
    *

    tuberculosis;
    *

    osteoporosis;
    *

    a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;
    *

    glaucoma or cataracts;
    *

    herpes infection of the eyes;
    *

    stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis;
    *

    depression or mental illness;
    *

    congestive heart failure;
    *

    recent heart attack;
    *

    high blood pressure;
    *

    unexplained diarrhea; or
    *

    if you have recently spent time in a tropical climate.

    If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use betamethasone, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.
    FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Betamethasone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

    How should I take Celestone (betamethasone)?

    Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

    Measure the liquid form of betamethasone with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

    Your steroid medication needs may change if you have unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you.

    This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using betamethasone.
    You may have withdrawal symptoms such as weakness, nausea, loss of appetite, and weight loss when you stop using betamethasone after using it over a long period of time. Do not stop using this medication suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. Carry an ID card or wear a medical alert bracelet stating that you are taking a steroid, in case of emergency. Any doctor, dentist, or emergency medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking steroid medication. Store betamethasone at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

    What happens if I miss a dose?

    If you take one dose daily: Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

    If you take more than one dose daily: Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, take two doses at that time, and then go back to your regular schedule.

    If you take one dose every other day: If it is still morning, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If you do not remember the missed dose until afternoon, skip the missed dose and take it the following morning. Then skip a day and go back to your regular every-other-day schedule.

    Do not take extra medicine to make up a missed dose unless your medication schedule is more than one dose daily.

    What happens if I overdose?
    Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have received too much of this medicine.

    A single large dose of betamethasone is not expected to produce life-threatening symptoms. However, high doses taken over a long period of time may cause weight gain, roundness of the face, increased facial hair growth, bruising, swelling, and muscle pain or weakness.

    What should I avoid while taking Celestone (betamethasone)?

    Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using steroid medication.

    Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with betamethasone. Vaccines may not work as well while you are taking a steroid.
    Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase the risk of damage to your stomach while you are taking betamethasone.

    Celestone (betamethasone) side effects
    Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

    *

    increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure);
    *

    feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
    *

    swelling, rapid weight gain, roundness of the face;
    *

    fast, slow, or uneven heart beats; or
    *

    severe depression, unusual thoughts or behavior.

    Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

    *

    sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes;
    *

    acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration;
    *

    slow wound healing;
    *

    increased sweating;
    *

    nausea, stomach pain, heartburn; or
    *

    muscle weakness, joint pain.

    Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

    What other drugs will affect Celestone (betamethasone)?

    There are many other medicines that can interact with steroids. Below is only a partial list of these medicines.

    Before taking betamethasone, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

    *

    aminoglutethimide (Cytadren);
    *

    amphotericin B (Abelcet, Ambisome, Fungizone);
    *

    cholestyramine (Prevalite, Questran);
    *

    cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune);
    *

    digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);
    *

    estrogen (including birth control or hormone replacement);
    *

    insulin or diabetes medications you take by mouth;
    *

    antibiotics such as azithromycin (Zithromax), clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S., Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), ketoconazole (Nizoral), or rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane);
    *

    medicines to treat Alzheimer's disease, such as donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne), rivastigmine (Exelon), or tacrine (Cognex);
    *

    medicine to treat myasthenia gravis, such as neostigmine (Prostigmin Bromide) or pyridostigmine (Mestinon);
    *

    seizure medications such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin), phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton); or
    *

    aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), diclofenac (Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

    If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use betamethasone, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

    There may be other drugs not listed that can affect betamethasone. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

    Where can I get more information?

    * Your pharmacist has information written for health professionals about betamethasone that you may read.

    What does my medication look like?

    Betamethasone is available with a prescription under the brand name Celestone. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

    *

    Celestone 0.6 mg--pink, scored tablets
    *

    Celestone Syrup 0.6 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon)

    * Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
    * Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

    CODE
    http://www.drugs.com/mtm/celestone.html


    Google is your friend.
  • melkimxmelkimx momoPosts: 6,099Administrator

    ADMIN

    celestone G worked wonders for my eczema. seriously, i have all these expensive prescription creams, but the celestone G i get from the korean supermarket is the only thing that works.

    BUT i only use it sparingly, when i have to. i definitely don't use it on pimples. i think it thins your skin... it's like a corticosteroid or something

  • Fascination StreetFascination Street everywhere!Posts: 440Member
    edited October 2007
    Korea might not have a system like the fda, but that doesn't mean all the medicine is sketch...although it's understandable why you would be so apprehensive you should be just as weary as medicine in america as well as korea or any other country for that matter. Everyone everywhere is going to claim that "medicine x" is going to be the best thing ever. Be smart and consult your doctor before taking any type of medication, don't just slap it on your skin or digest it just because it has some type of approval on it.

    anywho, celestone is a corticosteroid (betamethesone)...it's just another type of steroid cream like hydrocortisone. it helps reduce swelling, itching and allergic reactions. I've found it to work really well for bug bites and the occasional rash I get from swimming in pools and lakes (chiggers). that's about as much as I know off the top of my head. just google "betamethesone" if you want to find out more

    oh I do know that because it is a steroid cream, you should not use it to help with pigmentation problems for your skin

    hope that help
  • ovaltinejenkinsovaltinejenkins Posts: 5,588Member
    weird. i just put this on. i have small bumps on my hands and if you look at them closely,they kind of look like scabs.. but they don't itch, so i told my mom this and she handed me this cream.
    i like korean medicines! i feel like they work faster.

  • suzushiisuzushii Posts: 838Member
    Ok seriously, my mum is a doctor, and I've had pimples and other skin problems and she NEVER told me to use corticosteroids. They're a VERY serious drug. The ONLY time she said I should use it was when I had this massive skin allergy to a pimple treatment, that resulted in my entire face being red and inflamed.

    And even then, she said to stop using it after a day or two.

    Do NOT use it like a everything-drug.

    And since it's your parents and other non-doctors telling you this - never take their advice. There's a reason medical school is hard, and takes decades to master. It's cuz you can't just recommend drugs willy-nilly.

    I mean, did u know right now we, as a species, we're bending over backwards trying to find antibiotics to diseases that are already resistant to most other older drugs? You know WHY they are so resistant. It's because, you. as a human, shouldn't use the same antibiotic twice ideally, and if you can't help it, at least NEVER one after the other. Because if you use the same one repeatedly, that way you provoke resistance in the disease. Making it HARDER to kill.

    But people, being idiots, take antibiotics not only the same one multiple times, making it USELESS for allll the rest of us, but they also take it the WRONG way. Like, stopping taking it when they feel fine. WRONG. A course of antibiotics is how many days the doctors says. You don't stop when you feel fine, you stop when you complete the course. If you stop earlier, you allow some of the disease to linger, enough to maybe, infect someone else, and then be resistant to the drug you took?

  • joelibzjoelibz Mmmm! Posts: 433Member
    If its anything like a corticosteroid and it thins the skin you probably shouldnt use for a long time..

    I know I used a corticosteroid on my skin for eczema last winter and it made it real nice n smooth but when i stopped using it I got these weird as.s red rashes on my face that eventually went away but I think it was steroid incuded rosacea.. T.T ..never doing that again..
  • MeenuhMeenuh Rageaholic Supernerd. City of AngelsPosts: 5,724Member
    Oooooh my bf always uses this stuff. Hahah. Especially for his ears.. they get weird sometimes. The skin starts flaking and it's like cut and bleeds so he puts it on his ears.
    Some say i'm a genius, others say i'm crazy
    but they all say i'm a little on the weird side
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